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L i« j 
758 
.377 
1952/53 




EIGHTY-FIFTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF MARYLAND 

1953 



Msrylar," 1 Room 
etrity of Maryland Lib*- 



DO EOT CiRCUIim 



Digitized 


by the Internet Arch 






i 


in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/report00mary_81 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY -SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

Yyu*s^**^> State Board of Education. 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1953 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



STATE OF MARYLAND 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— JUNE 1953 



Name Address 

WENDELL D. ALLEN, Pres Cumberland 

JEROME FRAMPTOM, JR., Vice-pres. 

Federalsburg 

D WIGHT 0. W. HOLMES Baltimore 



Name Address 

MRS. GARVIN TANKERSLEY....Bethesda 

RICHARD W. CASE Baltimore 

MRS. CURTIS WALKER Chevy Chase 

VACANCY 



THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

Administrative Assistant I 



State Superintendent of Schools 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 

Ass't State Sup't. for Vocational Education 
JOHN J. SEIDEL 

Ass't State Sup't. in Finance and Research 
DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN 

Directors 

MERLE S. BATEMAN. Certification and 

Accreditation 
JAMES E. SPITZNAS, Instruction 

Assistant Directors 

W. THEODORE BOSTON, Certification 

and Accreditation 
WILLIAM S. SARTORIUS, Finance and 

Research 

Supervisors 

ELIZABETH AMERT, Home Economics 
MRS. GRACE A. DORSEY, Elementary 
Schools 

GENEVA F. ELY, Special Education 
R. CHRISTINE HOGAN, Research 
MRS. GLADYS T. HOPKINS, Curriculum 
PAUL E. HUFFINGTON, Colored Schools 
DWIGHT P. JACOBUS, Educational 

Services to Industry 
HERSHEL M. JAMES, Industrial Educa- 
tion 

HARRY M. McDONALD. Agriculture 
EVELYN MILLER, Home Economics 
JAMES L. RE ID, School Plant 
DOROTHY SHIRES, Elementary Schools 
HERBERT R. STEINER, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation 
ELEANOR G. WEAGLY, School Lunch 
Program 

WILLIS WHITE, High Schools 
Assistant Supervisors 

CHARLES V. AKELEY, Finance 
C. WILLIAM ANTHONY, Research 
CHARLES C. CONLON, JR., Accredita- 
tion 

GEORGE M. CRAWFORD, Curriculum 
JOSEPH ENDSLOW, Veterans On-the- 

Farm Program 
HELEN D. GEORGE, Editor of Publica- 
tions 

RICHARD McKAY, Accreditation 
GEORGE MYERS, School Lunch Pro- 
gram 

M. ELEANOR RICE, Certification 
ETHEL M. SAMMIS, Physical Education 

and Recreation 
HELEN L. WIDMYER, Accreditation 

Counselor 

FRANK H. NACHMAN, Veterans On- 
the-Job Program 

Consultant Architect 
*F. J. THUMAN 
Auditor 
tT. HOFMANN CLIFT 



RUTH E. HOBBS 

Telephone Operator I 

MRS. WILDA R. TAYLOR 

Statisticians 

MRS. ANNE K. CARROLL, I 
MRS. GENEVIEVE J. NEKERVIS, I 
MRS. VERDA K. McCLOW, II 
MARY E. McNEILL, II 

Statistical Clerk 

MRS. HAZEL LITCHFIELD 

Principal Account Clerks 

MRS. GRACE STEELE TRAVERS, I 
MINNIE GERBER, II 
MRS. MARY C HOOVER, II 
BLANCHE E. KEEN, II 

Stenographer-Secretaries 

MARGARET E. ALBAUGH 
E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS 
HELEN P. ELLIS 
ELSIE F. FORMAN 
CARRYE HAMBURGER 
MRS. HELEN C. KATENKAMP 
ELIZABETH McGINNITY 

Senior Stenographers 

MRS. FLORENCE ACKERMAN 

ALICE ALGIE 

MRS. BEVERLY ARMIGER 

MARGARET C. BROOKS 

LILLIAN O. ERPENSTEIN 

MRS. MARILYN W. FRANK 

MRS. SUZANNE NESS 

MRS. BESSIE PRICE 

MRS. SELMA STERN 

VIRGINIA STEVENSON 

MRS. BETTY JEAN WAGGONER 

MRS. HAZEL B. WILKERSON 

DOROTHY E. YOUNG 

Report Typist 

MRS. LAURA GAITHER 

Senior Typists 

MRS. CORTNNE COMBS 
MRS. VIRGINIA C. COOPER 
MARGARET PATON 

Senior Clerks 

MRS. GERTRUDE GORRELL 
MARGARET JACOBS 
MRS. DORIS VAN CLEAF 

Junior Clerk 

FLORENCE M. BRADY 

Duplicating Machine Operator II 
LLOYD E. HOLMES 

Key Punch Operator 

MRS. MARIE WOLLSCHLAGER 



* Part time. 

t On military leave. 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore- 1 

Medical Consultant 



Director 

R. C. THOMPSON 

Supervisors 

LIONEL BURGESS, Case Services 
GEORGE W. KELLER, Ass't.. Services 

for the Blind 
W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Guidance, 

Placement, and Training 

Counselor 

MYRTLE E. CHELL, Tuberculosis Cases 



*DEAN W. ROBERTS, M. D. 
2612 North Charles Street, Baltimore-18 

Stenographer- Secretary 

KATHLEEN E. SCHEVE 

Principal Stenographers 
ANNE NUSINOV 
CHARLOTTE A. SYLVESTER 

Senior Stenographer 
DORIS NOLAN 



* Part time. 

Branch Offices, Division 

Baltimore Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

District Supervisor 
THOMAS D. BRAUN 

Rehabilitation Counselors 

ERNEST C. ALLNUTT, JR. 
FOY L. LUNSFORD 
IRWIN D. MEDINGER 
WILLIAM B. MELVILLE 
RUTH E. RING 
H. SMITH SHUMWAY 
JAMES D. SMYTH 
CARROLL L. SPECK 

Stenographer-Secretary 
EMMA E. LUECKERT 

Senior Stenographers 

MRS. RUTH FRIEDLAND 
MRS. BERNADETTE MAFALE 
CLAIRE E. SCULLY 
MRS. FRANCES VOLK 

Receptionist-Clerk 

MRS. OLIVE MAYO 

Central Maryland Branch 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore-1 

District Supervisor 

W. BIRD TERWILLIGER, Acting 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
B. W. BARKER 
THOMAS N. HAASE 
MARTHA R. HARRISON 
HAROLD HAYES 
CHARLES HILL 
MRS. ELIZABETH B. SWISHER 



of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Senior Stenographers 
BELL M. SKLAR 
BEVERLY J. SHEAIN 

Western Maryland Branch 

170 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

District Supervisor 

KENNETH G. STONER 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
*J. LEO DELANEY 
t WILLIAM C. HILL 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. ALFREDA E. COFFMAN 

Eastern Shore Branch 

109 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

District Supervisor 

RAYMOND H. SIMMONS 

Rehabilitation Counselors 
ROBERT BURTON 
tFRANK A. TARBUTTON 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. GLADYS G. LEONARD 

Southern Maryland Branch 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

District Supervisor 
MERL D. MYERS 

Rehabilitation Counselor 
HENRY D. DEVLIN 

Senior Stenographer 

MRS. JANE J. HOFFMAN 



* At 108 Washington Street, Cumberland, 
t At 715 East Church Street, Frederick, 
t At Board of Education, Chestertown. 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 
400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore-1 



Director 

HELEN M. CLARK 
Supervisors 

MAE GRAHAM, School and Children's 
Libraries 

NETTIE B. TAYLOR. County and In- 
stitutional Libraries 
Counselors 

MRS. ELIZABETH McALLESTER, Tech- 
nical 

ANNE E. STURTEVANT, Readers' 
Librarians 

M. E. NAOMI JOHNSON, Associate 
JOSEPHINE M. BALDWIN, Senior 

MRS.' SUZANNE V. PEARCE, Assistant 



Stenographer-Secretarv 
DORIS ANDERSON 

Senior Stenographers 

MRS. JOANN ARMIGER 
MARTHA J. KEYDASH 

Library Assistant 

MRS. BEVERLY BURMEISTER 

Senior Tvpist 

MRS. JOYCE REECE 

Junior Typist 

REGINA HERRMANN 

Porter 

LOUIS EDWIN MYERS 



2 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 



County Librarian 

ALLEGANY — 

Cumberland Free Public Library 

MARY G. WALSH 
Westernport Public Library 

MRS. ELIZABETH THOMAS 

ANNE ARUNDEL — 

Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Li- 
brary. Annapolis ESTHER KING 

BALTIMORE CITY — 

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore 1 
AMY WINSLOW 

BALTIMORE— 

Baltimore County Library, 30 Chesapeake 
Avenue, Towson 4 

RICHARD MINNICH 

CAROLINE— 

Federalsburg Community Library 

MRS. CAROLYN G. NOBLE 
Ridgely Community Library 

MRS. PAUL HOFFMAN 

CARROLL— 

Davis Library, Westminster 

MRS. HELEN REX SHROYER 

CECIL— 

Cecil County Librarv, Elkton 

MRS. DOROTHY W. JEFFERSON 
Cecilton Community Library 

MRS. ERNEST MANN 

CHARLES— 

Charels County Library, La Plata 

DORIS HOLMES 

DORCHESTER — 

Dorchester County Public Library, 

Cambridge MRS. MARGARET HENRY 
Hurlock Free Public Library 

HOPE S. BARBER 
Vienna Public Library 

MRS. ALAN WEBB 

FREDERICK — 

C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick 

JOSEPHINE ETCHISON 
Emmitsburg Public Library 

LOUISE SEBOLD 

GARRETT — 

Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 
Oakland EDITH BROCK 

HARFORD — 

Harford County Library, Bel Air 

MRS. DOROTHY GLACKIN 
Havre de Grace Public Library 

MRS. ROSWELL POPLAR 



County Librarian 

HOWARD — 

Howard County Library, Ellicott City 

MRS. LENNA BURGESS 

KENT — 

Chestertown Public Library 

CORNELIA DAVIS 

MONTGOMERY — 

Montgomery County Department of Pub- 
lic Libraries, 214 Diamond Avenue, 
Gaithersburg GEORGE B. MORELAND 
Rockville Public Library 

MRS. ROSE C. MILLER 
Takoma Park Public Library 

MRS. RUTH B. PRATT 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— 

Prince George's County Memorial Li- 
brary, 4227 Gallatin Street, Hvattsville 
MRS. MARY KENAN HADLEY 
Greenbelt Public Library 

MRS. MARJORIE A. MUIR 

QUEEN ANNE'S— 

Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville 
MRS. MARGARET WOODFORD, Acting 

ST. MARY'S— 

St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 
Leonardtown ELOISE PICKRELL 

SOMERSET— 

Corbin Memorial Librarv, Crisfield 

MRS. GLADYS DAUGHERTY 
Princess Anne Public Library 

MRS. J. RANDOLPH FIELD 

TALBOT— 

Talbot County Free Library, Easton 

SARAH COCKEY 

WASHINGTON — 

Washington County Free Library, 
Hagerstown 

MRS. MARY LOUISE HOLZAPFEL 

WICOMICO— 

Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury 
MRS. FRED HORSLEY, JR. 
WORCESTER — 

Pocomoke Citv Public Library 

MRS. AMY BLAINE SCHOOLFIELD 
Snow Hill Public Librarv 

MARGIE GODFREY 
Berlin Public Library 

MARY F. BAILEY 



PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Towson WILLIAM E. HENRY Bowie 

LILLIAN C. COMPTON Frostburg MILES W. CONNOR.. ..Coppin, Baltimore-17 

J. D. BLACKWELL Salisbury 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

31 Light Street, Baltimore-2 



HOOPER S. MILES, State Treasurer, 
Chairman 

J. MILLARD TAWES, State Comptroller 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR., State Supt. of 
Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME, Supt. of Schools 
Montgomery County, Vice-chairman 

WILLIS H. WHITE, Principal, Baltimore 
County 

J. P. MANNION, Director 



THOMAS I. HAYES, Executive Secretary 
MINNIE HAMILTON, Administrative As- 
sistant II 

HELEN M. KIRKMAN, Principal Clerk 
MRS. AUDREY BEERE, Accounting Ma- 
chine Operator 
MRS. ANETA RICHARDSON, Accounting 

Machine Operator 
EMMA SIEGELIN, Senior Typist 
ELIZABETH RYAN. Senior Clerk 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS, DIRECTORS, AND 



SUPERVISORS— JUNE 1953 



County Address 

ALLEGANY — Cumberland 

Superintendent 

RALPH R. WEBSTER 
Assistant Superintendent 

RICHARD T. RIZER 
Director 

WILLIAM P. COOPER, Cafeterias 
Supervisors 

LEWYN C. DAVIS, High 
JANE E. BOTSFORD, Elementary 
MILDRED WILLISON, Elementary 
WINIFRED GREENE, Primary 
JULIUS D. LONNHOLM, Vocational and 

Adult Education 
THEODORE P. FOOTE, Art 
RALPH E. KESSLER, Special Educa- 
tion 

MRS. GLADYS MILLER EATON, Cafe- 

*RUTH C. McCOLLY, Home Economics 
JOSEPH T. DOWNEY, Buildings and 
Grounds 

ARTHUR G. RAMEY, Transportation 
HOMER S. HIGGINS, Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL — Annapolis 

Superintendent 

DAVID S. JENKINS 
Director 

MRS. ELEANOR B. WARING, Personnel 
Supervisors 

HOWARD A. KINHART. Senior High 
RUTH V. DUDDERAR, Junior High 
MRS. DOROTHY S. KIRKLEY, Ele- 
mentary 

MRS. VIRGINIA D. MOORE, Elemen- 

LEVLA.H DANIEL, Elementary 
SARAH V. JONES. Colored Elementary 
FRANK C. GUNDERLOY, Vocational 
DORIS CLEMENTS, Home Economics 
R. HAROLD McCANN, Buildings 
FRED ALEXANDER, Planning and Pur- 
chasing 

DENNIS TURNER, Maintenance 
FRED G. BAKER, JR., Transportation 
MARY E. MOSS, Pupil Personnel 

BALTIMORE — Towson 

Superintendent 

EDWARD G. STAPLETON 

Assistant Superintendents 

J. A. SENSENBAUGH, Elementary 
JAMES B. O'TOOLE. JR., High 

Director 

WILLIAM T. WILLIS, JR., Mainte- 
nance and Purchasing 
Supervisors 

JOHN W. CRAFT, Music 
OLIVE JOBES, Art 

HAROLD S. MARTIN, Physical Educa- 
tion and Health 

MARY E. KELLEHER, Home Economics 

RUTHETTA LIPPY. School Lunch 

MRS. L. KATHERYN LUSTNAUER, 
Special Services 

THOMAS R. LAWRENCE, Music 

ANNA MEEKS, Guidance 

T. M. GREENE, Business Subjects and 
Adult Education 

JEAN C. SISK, High 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 

MRS. WYLDA BENSON, Junior High 
G. ALFRED HELWIG, High 
HELEN E. HALE, High 
JOSEPH HILLYARD, High 
STELLA HUTCHISON, High 
MRS. LOUELLA H. WOODWARD, High 
JENNIE E. JESSOP. Elementary 
ELIZABETH D. HODGES, Libraries 
MYRTLE S. ECKHARDT, Elementary 
CLOTILDE DRECHSLER, Elementary 
ANNA G. SHEPPARD, Elementary 
MRS. DOROTHY V. MASON, Elementary 
M. KATHERINE DOST, Elementary 
MRS. PAULINE HOBBS, Colored Ele- 
mentary 

*MINNIE H. WOOLFORD, Colored High 
ARTHUR A. DICK, Vocational 
C. THOMAS DUNNOCK, Ass't.. Trans- 
portation 

HERMAN C. BURTON, Pupil Personnel 

CALVERT — Prince Frederick 

Superintendent 

HARRY R. HUGHES 

Supervisors 

MRS. MILDRED G. FINLON, Elemen- 
tary and High 

MRS. THELMA O. CORNISH, Colored 
Elementary and High 

MRS. LOLA M. PARKS, Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE — Denton 

Superintendent 

W. STEWART FITZGERALD 
Supervisors 

FRED G. USILTON, JR., High 
BEATRICE WILLIAMS, Elementary 
*MRS. LULA D. WARD, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
W. LAWRENCE LARAMORE, Mainte- 
nance 

JAMES P. HILL, Pupil Personnel 

CARROLL — Westminster 

Superintendent 

SAMUEL M. JENNESS 
Supervisors 

GERALD E. RICHTER, High 
JOHN F. WOODEN, JR., High 
RUTH E. DeVORE, Elementary 
CHARLES E. RECK, Elementary 
*PHILIP S. ROYER, Music 
MRS. JOSEPHINE WEST, Home Eco- 
nomics and Cafeterias 
*MAE E. PRINCE, Colored Elementary 
and High 

STUART WIDENER, Ass't., Maintenance 

and Transportation 
MAYE E. GRIMES, Pupil Personnel 

CECLL — Elkton 

Superintendent 

MORRIS W. RANNELS 
Administrative Assistant 

RALPH BEACHLEY 
Supervisors 

WILLIAM C. GRAHAM, High 

EDWIN B. FOCKLER. High 

OLIVE L. REYNOLDS, Elementarv 



5 



County Address 
MRS. MILDRED L. SOWERS, Elemen- 
tary 

* RACHEL E. BOYD, Home Economics 
JAMES M. RENN, Maintenance 
EDWIN H. BARNES, Pupil Personnel 

CHARLES— LaPlata 

Superintendent 
T. C. MARTIN 

Supervisors 

HAROLD CHANDLER, High 
B. LUCILE BOWIE. Elementary 
JOSEPH C. PARKS, Colored Elementary 
MRS. GENEVIEVE S. BROWN, Colored 
High 

MRS. CECELIA E. FARRALL, Pupil 

Personnel 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 

Superintendent 

JAMES G. BUSICK 

Supervisors 

ALBERT S. FARVER, High 
EVELYN E. JOHNSON, Elementary 
MRS. VIOLA J. COMEGYS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
WILBUR SLACUM, Maintenance 
JOHN T. COMER, JR., Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK — Frederick 

Superintendent 

EUGENE W. PRUITT 

Supervisors 

DUVAL W. SWEADNER, High 
MRS. LOUISE F. THOMPSON, Elemen- 
tary 

A. DRUCILLA WORTHINGTON, Ele- 
mentary 

WARREN R. EVANS, Physical Education 
and Health 
*CHARLES E. HENSON, Colored Elemen- 
tary and Higrh 
RUTH MacVEAN, School Lunch 
PAUL HOFFMASTER, Transportation 
LEWIS B. EADER, Maintenance 
GERTRUDE SMITH, Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT — Oakland 

Superintendent 

R. BOWEN HARDESTY 

Supervisors 

FOSTER D. BITTLE, High 

JOHN M. DUNN, High 

H. ELIZABETH SLATER, Elementary 

MRS. CAROLINE WILSON, Elementary 

OREN T. GRASER, Maintenance 

JOHN L. FITZWATER, Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD — Bel Air 

Superintendent 

CHARLES W. WILLIS 

Assistant Superintendent 
BENJAMIN S. CARROLL 

Administrative Assistants 
ALLEN B. AMOSS 
*CHARLES E. HARKINS 

Supervisors 

MRS. DOROTHY M. ROWE, High 

CLARK JONES, High 

HAZEL L. FISHER, Elementary 

MRS. ANNE M. NOONAN, Elementary 

JAMES H. CLOW. JR., Pupil Personnel 



* Part time in this position. 

6 



County Address 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 

Superintendent 

JOHN E. YINGLING 

Supervisors 

MRS. MARY R. HOVET, High 
CARMEN DELAPLANE, Elementary 
MORRIS L. WOODSON, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
FRANK B. DURIGG, Transportation and 

Maintenance 
HARRY T. MURPHY, Pupil Personnel 

KENT — Chestertown 

Superintendent 

READE W. CORR 

Supervisors 

CAREY E. LACEY, High 
LOUISE HEPBRON, Elementary 
*MRS. SARA B. CHAMBERS, Colored 
Elementary 
MRS. MADELEINE FENNELL, Pupil 
Personnel 

MONTGOMERY — Rockville 

Superintendent 

EDWIN W. BROOME 

Assistant Superintendents 
RICHARD E. CARPENTER 
THOMAS W. PYLE 
JAMES L. PRINCE 

Administrative Assistants 
GEORGE V. MENKE 
WILLIAM B. EVANS, JR. 

Directors 

BRIAN BENSON, Comptroller 

RICHARD REEM, Transportation 

MRS. ALICE NICEWARNER, Personnel 

and Statistics 
OTHO HAWKE, Maintenance 
ALBERT ROGERS. Custodial Services 

Supervisors 

MRS. HELEN P. BREADY, High 
HAROLD R. PACKARD, High 
MAXWELL E. BURDETTE, High 
*MRS. GENEVIEVE BLEW, High 
* MARIAN L. SCHWARTZ, High 
*MRS. AGNES DREWRY, High 
CHARLES HORN, Elementary 
ELSIE SCHURTER, Elementary 
ETHELEEN DANIEL, Elementary 
LILLIAN L. GORE, Elementary 
MARY L. GRAU, Elementary 
MRS. RUTH S. GUE, Elementary 
MAGDALEN EICHERT. Elementary 
CLARA G. STRATEMEYER, Elementary 
ALICE L. ROBINSON, Libraries 
MARJORIE BILLOWS, Art 
CRESENT J. BRIDE, Physical Educa- 
cation 

WILLIAM C. FEDDEMAN, Special Edu- 
cation 

MRS. MIRIAM TANNHAUSER, Special 

Education 

JULIA W. WATKINS, Home Economics 

and Cafeterias 
MRS. CORELLI A. DAVID, School 

Lunch 

C. MABLE SMITH, Curriculum 
MRS. LOUISE S. WALKER, Visual Aids 
*MRS. MARGARET T. JONES, Colored 
Elementary 
T. H. OWEN KNIGHT, Pupil Personnel 



County Address 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM S. SCHMIDT 

Assistant Superintendents 

THOMAS S. GWYNN, JR., School Plan- 
ning 

GEORGE H. ROBINSON. Personnel 
Director 

ROWANETTA S. ALLEN, Curriculum 
Supervisors 

LUCILE L. LURRY, High 
DEAN MANIFOLD, High 
EUNICE E. BURDETTE, Elementary 
A. MILDRED HOYLE, Elementary 
MRS. CATHERINE T. REED, Elemen- 
tary 

MRS. MARY B. WACKWITZ, Art 
MRS. MARY J. A. CAREY, Music 
ANGELA C. WEIXEL, Music 
MARY A. THOMPSON, Health Education 
VINCENT C. HOLOCHWOST, Physical 
Education 

ADA M. WARRINGTON, Physical Edu- 
cation 

EMMA BOWMAN, Elementary 
ELMER K. ZELLER, Industrial 
M. GLADYS DICKERSON. Home Eco- 
nomics and Adult Education 
FLORA SCHROYER, Cafeterias 
ELIZABETH McMAHON, Elementary 
MRS. LOUISE BENNETT, Libraries 
C. ELIZABETH RIEG, Special Services 
DOSWELL E. BROOKS, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
WILLIAM W. HALL, Assistant in Col- 
ored Schools 
JOHN W. HEIM, Transportation 
ARTHUR E. ROBINSON, Maintenance 
MARIAN E. LOBDELL, Pupil Personnel 

QUEEN ANNE'S — Centreville 

Superintendent 

HARRY C. RHODES 

Supervisors 

CARTER M. HICKMAN, High 
MRS. MARGARET S. STACK, Elemen- 
tary 

MRS. LOLA P. BROWN, Colored Elemen- 
tary and Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S — Leonardtown 

Superintendent 

LETTIE M. DENT 
Supervisors 

THOMAS L. SMITH, High 
E. VIOLETTE YOUNG. Elementary 
*MRS. MARGARET H. BURCH, Home 
Economics and School Lunch 
RALPH S. WATERS, Colored Elemen- 
tary 

HARRIET H. REEDER, Pupil Personnel 
SOMERSET — Princess Anne 

Superintendent 

C. ALLEN CARLSON 
Supervisors 

JOHN L. BOND, High 

MRS. ALICE MAE BEAUCHAMP, Ele- 
mentary 



* Part time in this position. 



County Address 
KERMIT COTTMAN, Colored Elemen- 
tary and High 
CHARLES O. BURNS, JR., Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

TALBOT — Easton 

Superintendent 

J. WILLARD DAVIS 
Supervisors 

ARTHUR R. HIGGINBOTTOM, High 
M. LILLIAN CHEEZUM, Elementary 
*KATHLEEN A. FRANCIS, Colored 
Elementary and High 
MRS. VIRGINIA DARROW, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 

Superintendent 

WILLIAM M. BRISH 

Assistant Superintendent 
WILLIAM C. DIEHL 

Administrative Assistant 
C. PAUL BARNHART 

Supervisors 

MRS. REBEKAH STONEBRAKER, High 
WILBUR S. HOOPENGARDNER Junior 
High 

F. PAULINE BLACKFORD, Elementary 
KATHERINE L. HEALY. Elementary 
ANNE M. RICHARDSON, Elementary 
MIRIAM L. HOFFMAN, Music 
ALFRED ROTH, Industrial Arts 
CATHERINE L. BEACHLEY, Guidance 
MRS. ANORMALLEE WAY, Home Eco- 
nomics and School Lunch 
MARY E. BYER, Health and Library 

Curriculum 
RUSSELL KEPLER, Maintenance 
JOSEPH H. VANCE, Finance 
RICHARD MARTIN, Pupil Personnel 

WICOMICO — Salisbury 

Superintendent 

JAMES M. BENNETT 

Supervisors 

HELEN C. WOOTTON, High 
LOUISE MITCHELL, Elementary 
MARTHA R. JONES, Elementary 
MARIE A. DASHIELL, Colored Ele- 
mentary and High 
BRANCHE H. PHILLIPS. JR., Trans- 
portation 

SHELDON B. DAWSON, Pupil Personnel 

WORCESTER — Snow Hill 

Superintendent 

PAUL D. COOPER 

Supervisors 

ALFRED S. HANCOCK, Elementarv and 
High 

PAUL S. HYDE, Elementarv and High 

MRS. ANNIE B. DOWNING, Colored 
Elementary 

BENJAMIN W. NELSON, Maintenance 
and Transportation 

MRS. LUCY S. PILCHARD, Pupil Per- 
sonnel 



7 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 9 

Legislation Affecting Education 10 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 14 

School Building Report 22 

School Lunch Program 25 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Certification and Accreditation 26 

Instruction 34 

Library Extension 45 

Vocational Rehabilitation 51 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 55 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools 56 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 57 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 61 

Births in Maryland 64 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 67 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 68 

Grade Enrollment 69 

Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 73 

School Census 75 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 82 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 90 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 106 

Teachers by Subject 112 

Teachers: by Certification, Summer School Attendance, Resignations, Turnover, 

Source 113 

Number and Size of Schools 127 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 133 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 134 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 138 

Cost per Pupil 140 

Average Salaries 146 

Salaries 150 

Transportation 152 

Adult Education; Vocational Education 157 

School Lunch 164 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 166 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 170 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 177 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 178 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 179 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 187 

Parent-Teacher Associations • 188 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 192 

State and County Health Program for School Children 195 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 198 

Index 244 

8 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1954 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the eighty-seventh 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of edu- 
cation throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 
1952 and ending June 30, 1953. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



9 



10 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January, 1953 

Bond and Loan Bills 

Chapter 128 

An Act to empower the Anne Arundel County Board of Education to 
borrow up to $3,500,000 to finance the construction or extension of the 
public schools in that county. 

Chapter 139 

An Act to authorize the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore to bor- 
row up to $20,000,000 for the purpose of constructing and equipping 
new school buildings. 

Chapter 185 

An Act to authorize the Queen Anne's County Commissioners to borrow 
up to $1,250,000 to construct and equip school buildings. 

Chapter 226 

An Act to authorize the County Commissioners of Allegany County to 

borrow up to $3,500,000 for the purpose of constructing and equipping 
various elementary, junior and senior high schools in Allegany County. 

Chapter 254 

An Act to empower the County Commissioners of Wicomico County to 
borrow up to $1,600,000 for the purpose of constructing and equipping 
school buildings in Wicomico County. 

Chapter 325 

An Act to empower the County Commissioners of Cecil County to bor- 
row up to $1,000,000 for the purpose of erecting, repairing, and equip- 
ping school buildings in that county. 

Chapter 351 

An Act to empower the County Commissioners of Dorchester County to 
borrow up to $500,000 for certain construction work on the Academy 
School and the Cambridge High School. 

Chapter 401 

An Act to authorize the Howard County Commissioners to borrow up to 
$500,000 for the purpose of constructing and equipping schools. 

Chapter 550 

An Act to authorize the Prince George's County Board of Education and 
the Board of County Commissioners to borrow up to $9,500,000 for the 
purpose of constructing and equipping school buildings. 

Chapter 609 

An Act to authorize the creation of a State debt in the amount of $20,- 
000,000 to be known as the "General Public School Construction Loan 
of 1953," the proceeds of which are to be used to supplement the financ- 
ing of the construction of public school buildings and facilities, and for 
the acquisition of necessary sites for such buildings by each of the 
counties and by the City of Baltimore. In effect this bill increases the 
State loan pool for school construction from $50,000,000 to $70,000,000 
and permits the counties and the City of Baltimore to borrow certain 
amounts for school building construction on the credit of the State. 

Chapter 630 

An Act to empower the Calvert County Commissioners to borrow up to 
$300,000 to defray school construction expenses. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



11 



Chapter 631 

An Act to empower the Calvert County Commissioners to borrow up to 
$250,000 to defray current school expenses. 

Chapter 780 

An Act to authorize the creation of a State debt of $15,040,950 to be 
used for certain construction, deferred maintenance, and equipment 
purposes of the various departments and agencies of this State. Funds 
for improvements to the five State Teachers Colleges are allocated as 
follows: Bowie, $425,000; Coppin, $230,000; Frostburg, $739,500; Salis- 
bury, $9,500; Towson $78,500. 



Board of Education Bills 

Chapter 57 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 6 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and to add Sec- 
tion 12A which provides that the Board of Education of Wicomico 
County shall consist of five members. 

Chapter 316 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 46 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) providing that 
the Montgomery County Board of Education shall hold an annual meet- 
ing on or before January 10 in each year. 

Chapter 514 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 6 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and to add Sec- 
tion 12B which provides that the number of members on the Harford 
County Board of Education be increased from three to five. 

Chapter 560 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 7 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) authorizing a 
$300 expense account for members of the Anne Arundel County Board of 
Education. 

Chapter 596 

An Act to add Section 12C to Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) which provides that the six members of the 
Carroll County Board of Education shall be divided equally between 
members of that political party which in the latest gubernatorial 
election received a majority of the votes and of that party which 
received the second highest number of votes. 

Chapter 597 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with Amendments, Section 6 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and to add Sec- 
tion 12D which provides the Board of Education of St. Mary's County 
shall consist of five persons of whom at least two shall be members 
of that political party which polls the second highest number of votes 
in the latest gubernatorial election. 

Chapter 605 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 46 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) increasing the 
payment for traveling and other expenses of the St. Mary's County 
Board of Education from $100 per year for each member to $200. 



12 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



Chapter 617 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 6 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and to add Sec- 
tion 12E providing that the Prince George's County Board of Education 
shall be composed of six persons, two of whom shall be members of 
that political party which polled the second highest number of votes in 
the latest gubernatorial election. 

Finance and Salary Bills 

Chapter 21 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 136 of Article 
8 of The Code of Public Local Laws of Maryland (1930 Edition) re- 
moving from said section an obsolete reference to the public school 
fund of Cecil County. This section provided that all fines levied on 
persons who failed to answer a summons to appear before the county 
commissioners were to be credited to the public school fund. 

Chapter 216 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 66 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) adding Calvert 
County to the number of those boards of education required to submit 
to their boards of county commissioners an annual report containing: 
(1) a statement showing the source and application of all funds 
received and expended and the balance in each account; (2) a con- 
solidated statement showing the operating results, receipts, expendi- 
tures, and balance of the operations of the public schools of the county. 

Chapter 263 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Sections 102, 209 and 
213 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) 
revising the minimum salary schedule for the public school teachers 
of this State according to recommendations made by the Green Com- 
mission. For 1953-54 and 1954-55 the State minimum salary schedule 
will be increased from $2200-$3800 to $2500-$4300. In 1955-56 the 
minimum salary schedule will be raised to $2800-$4600. 

Chapter 275 

An Act to add Section 66A to Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Mary- 
land (1951 Edition) requiring that separate bank accounts for con- 
struction funds and current expense funds shall be maintained by all 
boards of education. 

Chapter 284 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 66 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) including Charles 
County and Wicomico County among those counties which require their 
boards of education to submit an annual report and audit of the 
books to the county commissioners. (See Chapter 216.) 

Chapter 286 

An Act to repeal Section 159 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) which required the county superintendent of 
schools as treasurer of the board of education to deposit daily all public 
funds in the bank paying the highest rate of interest. 

Chapter 478 

An Act to authorize Harford County to pay certain retired teachers a 
sum sufficient to make the total amount of their pensions equal $100 
per month. 

Chapter 534 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 114 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) giving an addi- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



13 



tional sum not to exceed $50 per month to retired school teachers in 
Carroll County and in Wicomico County whose present retirement 
benefits total less than $125 per month. 

Chapter 602 

An Act to add Section 217A to Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) directing the Calvert County Commissioners to 
earmark Incentive Fund money received from the State to repay 
money received out of the General Public School Construction Loan 
of 1949. 

Chapter 619 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, subsections (b)-(n) 
of Section 153 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 
Edition) authorizing for supervisors, minimum salary benefits com- 
parable to those received by teachers under the new schedule in 
Chapter 263. The salary scale for supervisors is $900 above the teach- 
ers' scale with the bachelor's degree and $1100 above the teachers' 
scale with the master's degree. 

Chapter 751 

An Act to add subsection (b-1) to Section 178 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) providing for an annual State aid fund of 
10 cents per capita for those counties and Baltimore City in which 
public libraries are now operating. The funds are to be used only 
for current operations. 

Miscellaneous Bills 

Chapter 204 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 45 of Article 
2B of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) providing that 
no alcoholic beverage license shall be issued for use within 300 feet of 
any school or church. 

Chapter 343 

An Act to repeal and re-enact, with amendments, Section 42 of Article 
77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) revising the law 
calling for a State supervisor of rural schools and a white State 
supervisor of colored schools. These two obsolete positions have been 
eliminated from the law in order to bring the law into harmony with 
current practice. 

Chapter 402 

An Act to add Section 1233C to Article 17 of the Code of Public Local 
Laws of Prince George's County (1943 Edition) authorizing the Board 
of Education of Prince George's County to appoint a Director of 
Kindergarten Schools. A kindergarten may be established in any 
school district when parents of at least thirty 4 to 6-year old children 
petition for it. Maintenance and salary costs of these schools shall be 
paid by the board of education from tuition fees to be levied on each 
child attending the schools. 

Chapter 694 

An Act to add Section 227A to Article 66V2 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) providing that no person other than the 
driver or the fuel station attendant shall occupy or be on or within any 
school bus while it is being fueled. 

Chapter 720 

An Act to add Section 195A to Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland (1951 Edition) enabling the Department of Public Libraries 
of Montgomery County to receive the benefits provided by Section 178 
of Article 77, but removing the Department from supervision by the 
State Superintendent of Schools or the Division of Library Extension. 



14 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 

August 7, 1952 

Mr. Wendell D. Allen was elected president of the State 
Board of Education to succeed Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes, deceased. 
Dr. Lowndes who had been re-elected president of the Board on 
May 28, 1952, had served the Board as president since 1935. 
He was first appointed a member of the Board in 1925. 

Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., was elected vice-president of the 
Board. 

The Board adopted the following resolution on Dr. Tasker G. 
Lowndes : 

Resolution on Dr. Tasker G. Lowndes 

It was with profound sorrow and regret that the members of the State 
Board of Education learned of the death on July 10, 1952, of Dr. Tasker 
G. Lowndes who at the time of his death and for many years previously 
had been president of the Board. 

Dr. Lowndes was a graduate of Yale University, 1907, and of the 
University of Maryland School of Law, 1909. In 1945 the University of 
Maryland conferred upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Humanities. 
After practicing law for some years immediately following his admission 
to the Bar, Dr. Lowndes became president of the Second National Bank in 
Cumberland and continued in this capacity until 1948, when he resigned 
and became chairman of the board. Throughout his life he took an active 
interest in many other financial enterprises and was a leader in civic 
movements of importance. He refused widespread efforts to induce him to 
run for the State Senate and later for the governorship. 

In 1925, when the Maryland school system was being largely re- 
organized as a result of the Bachman Survey, Dr. Lowndes became a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Education by appointment of Governor Albert 
C. Ritchie. From the beginning he manifested an intense interest in the 
improvement of the educational opportunities of Maryland children, espe- 
cially those who were physically or mentally handicapped. Though he him- 
self had not attended a public school, he had a deep conviction of the 
importance of public education in a democracy and of the democratizing 
effect of the public schools. Despite the fact that he lived at a distance from 
Baltimore, Dr. Lowndes seldom missed a Board meeting. 

In February, 1935, Dr. Lowndes was elected president of the State 
Board of Education. In this capacity he continued his interest in improving 
the public school system. He weighed all proposed changes carefully but 
sympathetically, and when he had once decided on a policy exerted all force 
of his character and influence to see that it was carried out. He took the 
time to attend a number of national meetings of the group which is now 
known as the Council of Chief State School Officers and had a real grasp 
of the problems of public education. 

Ever courteous and thoughtful of others and with a delightful sense 
of humor, Dr. Lowndes made every gathering of which he was a part the 
happier for his presence. 

The children of Maryland and the State as a whole owe a lasting debt 
of gratitude to Dr. Lowndes. The members of the Board will long remember 
him. They extend to his family their sincere sympathy and condolence. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



The Board also adopted the following resolution on Dr. 
R. Floyd Cromwell who at the time of his death on July 4, 1952, 
was State Supervisor of High Schools : 

Resolution on Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell 

It was with sincere regret and with a deep sense of the loss which the 
Maryland public school system had suffered that the State Board of Educa- 
tion learned of the death of Dr. R. Floyd Cromwell, State Supervisor of 
High Schools, on July 4, 1952. 

Dr. Cromwell, a 1922 graduate of Western Maryland College, later 
studied at the University of Maine, at Harvard University, at Johns Hopkins 
University, and at George Washington University, and at the last named 
institution qualified in 1941 for the degree of Doctor of Education. Even 
when not engaged in formal study, intellectual curiosity kept him ever 
exploring the unknown. 

With the exception of one year when Dr. Cromwell taught in the 
Western Maryland College Preparatory School, he served the Maryland 
public schools throughout the whole of his professional career. He was 
principal successively of high schools in four of the counties of Maryland. 
In 1938, then principal of Cambridge High School, he accepted an appoint- 
ment as State Supervisor of Educational and Vocational Guidance, a new 
position in a field in which he had done special study and in which he had 
been conspicuously successful. He was equally fortunate in stimulating the 
introduction of guidance in the secondary schools of the State, where it 
became an integral and significant part of the service offered to young 
people in the Maryland high schools. 

In the meantime Dr. Cromwell had attained a national and even an 
international reputation in his chosen field. He was in great demand as 
a speaker and as a teacher in the summer sessions at leading universities 
in this country and in Canada. His acceptance of the invitations which did 
not interfere with his professional obligations in Maryland added to his 
prestige. 

In 1948 Dr. Cromwell became State Supervisor of High Schools. To 
this task he devoted his energies with characteristic enthusiasm and 
originality. He introduced as a new procedure in high school supervision 
conferences with small groups of high school principals during the summer 
months to help each principal work out organization plans for his school 
and thus precluded mistakes which would have interfered with efficiency. 
His ability to translate general principles into homely, down-to-earth 
terms, his ready wit, and his inexhaustible fund of pertinent anecdotes, 
gave point to his professional efforts and made them not only effective but 
stimulating and delightful. The Maryland system owes much to his creative 
spirit and to his devotion to the best interest of the youth whom he served. 

The Board wishes to record its appreciation to Dr. Cromwell and his 
value as a member of the State Department of Education, and to extend 
sympathy to his family. 

The Board was advised that the U. S. Commissioner of 
Education had approved as of July 21, 1952, the extension of the 
current State Plan for Vocational Education, along with amend- 
ments adopted by the State Board in May, 1952. Dr. Pullen 
stated that Maryland receives about $300,000 annually from 
the Federal Government for vocational education, including 
vocational agriculture, home economics, industrial education, 
distributive education, teacher training work at the University 
of Maryland, and half the salaries of the director and the super- 
visors of vocational education in the State Department of Educa- 



16 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



tion. Through the Division of Vocational Education, the State 
Department prepares plans for the aforementioned activities 
in accordance with principles formulated by the U. S. Com- 
missioner of Education. 

Following a request by the Governor, the State Board 
agreed to act as the State approval agency for on-the-job 
training and schools for veterans under Public Law 550. The 
Board has performed a similar function under the previous 
G. I. Bill. 

The board expressed approval of a bulletin, Maryland 
Public Schools, the first of a series to be published by the State 
Department of Education to give school people and others infor- 
mation about the public schools of Maryland. 

November 25, 1953 

Upon the recommendation of the State Superintendent, the 
Board amended By-laws 43 and 13, dealing with War Emergency 
Certificates, to provide for the issuance of Emergency Certifi- 
cates. The validity of the War Emergency Certificates was con- 
fined to the period of the Second World War and for six months 
thereafter. The war ended officially on April 28, 1952. Emer- 
gency certificates will be issued whenever the number of avail- 
able teachers who qualify for regular teachers' certificates is not 
sufficient to staff the public schools. The War Emergency Cer- 
tificates held by teachers in service on November 25, 1952, will 
be considered Emergency Certificates. (See report of Division 
of Certification and Accreditation for By-laws 43 and 13 as 
amended.) 

Clarification was given by Dr. Pullen on the certificate, 
salary and retirement status of teachers who hold emergency 
certificates; those who hold provisional certificates; and those 
who hold regular certificates. The Board was advised that 
teachers holding emergency certificates have only yearly tenure 
and may not belong to the State Teachers' Retirement System. 
In some instances teachers with emergency certificates are paid 
on the same scale as regularly qualified teachers. These emer- 
gency certificates are valid only during the emergency and do 
not require the holders to earn additional credits for renewal. 
Teachers holding provisional certificates receive $200 less than 
those holding regular certificates but they may belong to the 
State Teachers' Retirement System. Teachers holding regular 
certificates receive full salaries, belong to the Teachers' Retire- 
ment System, have tenure, and must present credit for addi- 
tional college work or other objective evidence of professional 
growth at intervals of from 3 to 6 years to keep their certificates 
in force. It was requested that a report be made at a later Board 
meeting on the inequities which may exist in the three types of 
teachers' certificates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



Dr. Pullen reported that a committee, authorized by the 
Board and consisting of certain members of the staff and outside 
consultants, has been appointed to study the preparation and 
supply of teachers, especially for the elementary school. 

The Board's attention was called to a statement of tentative 
policies adopted by the county superintendents on the selection of 
textbooks. It was pointed out that the county boards of educa- 
tion are responsible for the selection of textbooks and that it 
appears desirable to have some uniformity in policy regarding 
their selection. 

Dr. Pullen next discussed the report of the Maryland Com- 
mission to Study Public Education and Finances. The Commis- 
sion reached the conclusion that the financial structure under- 
lying public education in Maryland should be continued; that 
teachers' salaries are low and should be raised ; and that the State 
and local units should share the responsibility. The Commission 
proposes a transition period in moving into a situation where 
there is more stability. 

In 1953-54 and 1954-55, according to the recommendations, 
the State minimum salary scale for teachers will begin at $2,500 
and range to a maximum of $4,300, with a limitation of $300 as 
the highest increase to be paid to any teacher, any additional 
increase needed to reach the salary schedule to be carried over 
until later. For the year 1955-56 and thereafter the minimum 
under the State schedule would be $2,800 per year, ranging up 
to $4,600. The schedules are to be for fully qualified teachers ; 
others are to receive $200 less annually. The first two increases 
for teachers with one and two years' experience, respectively, 
would be $100, and the eight subsequent increments would be 
$200 annually. 

It is proposed that for the first two years the additional cost 
be borne entirely by the State. In 1955-56 the new salary sched- 
ule would be incorporated into the equalization program, and the 
county tax rate for calculation purposes would be raised from 
65 cents per $100 of assessed valuation to 75 cents. It also 
proposed that the State flat grant fund, "Aid per Classroom" be 
increased as follows: In 1953-54, from $400 to $440 ($420 to be 
included in the equalization calculation) ; in 1954-55, $480 per 
classroom ($440 to be included in the equalization calculation) ; 
in 1955-56 and thereafter, $600 per classroom (the full amount 
to be used in the equalization calculation). It was pointed out 
that the proposals of this Commission would be placed before the 
Legislature in the 1953 session; also that the Governor had 
agreed to include in the State budget a sufficient sum to make 
the proposals effective September 1, 1953. 



18 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



The Board passed the following motion on the report of the 
Maryland Commission to Study Public Education and Finances : 

In view of the fact that on November 30, 1950, and on February 
27, 1951, the State Board of Education went on record as favoring 
a five hundred dollar increase in the minimum salary scale for 
teachers throughout the State of Maryland, and further went on 
record as favoring an increase in the Incentive Fund for school 
buildings and construction, the recommendations of the Maryland 
Commission to Study Public Education and Finances, as detailed in 
the Eeport of the Commission published in November, 1952, be and 
they are hereby approved. 

The Board authorized the State Superintendent to initiate 
legislation to repeal Section 42 (3) and (4) of the Public School 
Laws of Maryland, Annotated Code of Maryland, 1951 Editon. 
This change would eliminate the need to employ a supervisor of 
rural schools and a white supervisor of colored schools. This 
latter provision had been included originally because the General 
Education Board had white agents for colored schools in many 
states, including Maryland. Supervisors now give assistance to 
all schools ; also a colored supervisor has been employed for some 
time. The provision for a supervisor of rural schools is obsolete 
because no differentiation is made between city and rural schools. 

February 25, 1953 

The State Superintendent called the attention of the Board to 
a letter from six private colleges in Baltimore requesting that 
the Maryland State Department of Education and the Baltimore 
City Department 

(1) jointly invite all institutions of higher learning and all interested 
educational associations in the Baltimore area to a meeting to 
consider the desirability of undertaking a survey of the educa- 
tional needs of Baltimore and environs for the next ten years; 

(2) jointly co-operate with all interested institutions in an endeavor 
to implement the findings of such a meeting through existing 
facilities, if possible; otherwise, through planning additional 
facilities to supplement but not supplant those already in existence; 
and 

(3) jointly sponsor a plan for closer co-operation between the secondary 
schools and the institutions of higher learning — both public and 
private — commencing in 1953. 

The Governor had been approached on this problem and had 
appointed the following Commission to study the needs of higher 
education in Maryland: 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, President, University of Maryland 
Dr. Martin D. Jenkins, President, Morgan State College 
Dr. Earle T. Hawkins, President, Towson' State Teachers College 
Dr. Detlev W. Bronk, President, Johns Hopkins University 
Reverend Thomas J. Murray, S. J., President, Loyola College 
Dr. Otto Kraushaar, President, Goucher College 
Dr. Lowell S. Ensor, President, Western Maryland College 
Mr. Roszel C. Thomsen, President, Baltimore City Board of School 
Commissioners 

Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State Superintendent of Schools, Chairman 



Maryland State Department of Education 



19 



Dr. Pullen reported on school legislation before the 1953 
session of the Maryland General Assembly with special reference 
to bills carrying out the recommendations of the Commission to 
Study Public Education and Finance (Green Commission). Men- 
tion was made of bills to increase minimum salary scales for 
county supervisors and superintendents ; to increase aid to public 
libraries ; to increase State loan funds for school buildings by an 
additional $20,000,000. 

The Board voted to ask the Governor hereafter to add a 
column to the printed budget, indicating the amounts requested 
by the various boards or agencies ; a copy of this letter was to be 
sent to the Budget Director. 

It was reported that the budget being considered by the 
Legislature provides salary increases for State employees. The 
new schedule is arrived at as follows : the first step of the present 
scale for each class is increased by $170 and becomes the basic 
salary; the annual increment will be four per cent of the base, 
instead of five per cent as at present, until the maximum is 
reached in five years. 

The Board announced the death of Mr. William L. Klinga- 
man on February 5, 1953. Mr. Klingaman who was Assistant 
Supervisor of Accreditation had previously been Supervisor of 
High Schools in Worcester County. 

May 27, 1953 

The Board welcomed Mrs. Ruth McCormick Tankersley of 
Montgomery County, appointed to the State Board to complete 
the term of the late Dr. Nicholas Orem. 

Mr. Wendell D. Allen was re-elected President of the State 
Board of Education and Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr. was re-elected 
Vice-president. 

The Board approved the following resolution on Mr. J. Wal- 
ter Huffington, former State Supervisor of Colored Schools in 
Maryland : 

Resolution on J. Walter Huffington 

It was with sincere regret that the State Board of Education learned of 
the death of Mr. J. Walter Huffington, former State Supervisor of Colored 
Schools for Maryland. 

Mr. Huffington was the first State Supervisor of Colored Schools to be 
appointed in Maryland. The position was established in the State Depart- 
ment of Education in 1917 with funds furnished by the General Education 
Board, an arrangement which is similar to that in all the Southern States. 
Later on, the position was supported by State funds. 

A graduate of St. John's College, with a master's degree from Colum- 
bia University and extensive study at other universities, Mr. Huffington 
was admirably equipped for leadership in the public school system. He 
began his career in 1898 as principal of an elementary school, and until 



20 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



1917 (serving in three states — North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland) 
successively was high school principal, college teacher, superintendent of 
schools, and teacher at the State Normal School (now the State Teachers 
College at Towson). In 1917 he became Supervisor of Colored Schools in 
the State Department of Education. He was retired in 1945 and made his 
home in Denton. 

Through Mr. Huffington's inspiration and active leadership the number 
of one-teacher colored schools in the State was reduced appreciably and 
transportation was provided for 10,000 pupils to attend consolidated ele- 
mentary and high schools. Under his stimulus also the counties rebuilt 
a very large part of the colored school plants, with aid from the Rosenwald 
Fund covering buildings, transportation, and libraries. He interested many 
qualified teachers from out-of- State to come to Maryland and was in- 
strumental in changing the former Normal School at Bowie from a four- 
year combined secondary and teacher-training institution to a four-year 
professional college. He guided the counties in the establishment of ac- 
credited colored high schools, of which there were none when he began his 
work in Maryland. He co-operated with the superintendents and guided 
the county supervisors of colored schools in furnishing greatly improved and 
extended educational opportunities to the Negro youth of Maryland. 

Probably no one individual in the history of Maryland has contributed 
more to the improvement of public school education of the Negro than Mr. 
J. Walter Huffington. He was a man dedicated to a great cause, and he 
put all of his enormous energy, high intellect, and kindly heart into his 
work. The tremendous progress made in the education of the Negro 
children in Maryland has been built largely upon the foundations that he 
and his colleagues laid during the many years he was State Supervisor of 
Colored Schools. All citizens of the State should be grateful for his life. 

Arrangements in the State Department of Education for the 
training of veterans were explained to the Board. For some years 
the State has had three types of contracts with the Federal Gov- 
ernment to supervise three types of work with the veterans ; on- 
the-job training, on-the-farm training, and related instruction 
necessary with apprentice training. Two of these programs have 
diminished and the third one has ceased altogether. The Board 
approved the contracts with the Federal Government for on-the- 
job and on-the-farm training. 

The Board approved the revision of By-law 11 on Public 
School Transportation. 

The Board was reminded that the Department is responsible 
for the "Comeback" program over WMAR-TV at 6 :30 P. M. on 
alternate Tuesdays. The program, arranged by Mr. R. C. Thomp- 
son, Director of Vocational Rehabilitation, demonstrates the suc- 
cess of the rehabilitation program in individual cases. Another 
program, which occurs at 11:00 A.M. on Thursday mornings 
over the same station, televises actual classroom situations 
through the use of mobile units. 

The Board passed the following resolution in reference to 
diplomas for inductees : 

Seniors inducted into the armed services since February 1, 1953, 
provided they meet the conditions set up by this Department, shall 
receive their high school diplomas in June, 1953. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



21 



Dr. Pullen stated that later cases would be taken care of by 
acceleration of the high school course. 

The Board received from Dr. Pullen a manual on Civil De- 
fense prepared for the schools of Maryland. The material was 
prepared in co-operation with the Private Schools Association 
of Baltimore and Vicinity and the Catholic Schools of Maryland, 
and was published by the Maryland Civil Defense Agency. The 
Manual presents officially approved civil defense principles and 
procedures, from which the schools may adapt their individual 
civil defense plans. 

The Board expressed interest in the opportunity afforded by 
the Southern Education Foundation, in co-operation with the 
State Department of Education of fourteen southern states, for 
an extensive training program for principals of Negro schools. 
The Foundation has appropriated $150,000 for this purpose and 
through the interest of Mr. Paul E. Huffington, Supervisor of 
Colored Schools, an initial grant of $750 has been given the 
Maryland State Department of Education to conduct a one-week 
training program at Bowie State Teachers College this summer 
for principals of Negro schools, with plans for follow-up pro- 
grams during the 1953-54 school year. Further grants will be 
available later. In addition, four Negro principals have been 
chosen to spend five weeks at Tuskegee Institute with all expenses 
paid. This is another part of the same South-wide program but 
is not included in the Maryland allotment of $750. 

The Southern Education Foundation is the organization 
which supported the Travel Fellowship Plan of which Mr. Huf- 
fington took advantage in 1951, with the approval of the State 
Board. The Foundation is continuing this support in a grant of 
$4,000 annually to enable four people selected from the fourteen 
southern states to share this experience. 

The Board approved the recommendation of the Presidents 
of the State Teachers Colleges that the $200 increase provided 
by the 1953 Legislature be distributed as a flat $200 increase for 
each instructor. In approving this plan, the Board indicated it 
would continue to advocate the adoption of the salary schedule 
recommended by the Board in August, 1951. 

The Board was advised that the State Teachers College at 
Frostburg had recently been inspected and approved by the Com- 
mission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association. 



22 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



MARYLAND BUILDS PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1947-1953 

From 1947 to 1953, the counties and the City of Baltimore, 
spurred on by the unprecedented rise in the postwar enrollments, 
constructed new or additional schoolhouse facilities with a total 
pupil capacity of over 145,000. This building program represents 
an investment of more than $226,500,000 in the education, health, 
and welfare of our children. It is an accomplishment for which 
there is no previous parallel in the history of education in Mary- 
land. 

There are several factors to be kept in mind when the sta- 
tistics connected with this tremendous achievement are reviewed. 
During the decade following 1930, in spite of a considerable 
amount of Federal assistance given to schools through the various 
public works programs, the local units were still unable to raise 
sufficient funds to provide much needed school buildings. Conse- 
quently, new schoolhouse construction soon lagged far behind 
actual replacement requirements. The backlog of school con- 
struction continued to increase as the defense program developed 
in the early 1940's. Throughout the entire war period, shortages 
of labor and materials made it difficult to carry on even a normal 
program of maintenance, while the construction of new school 
buildings was at a virtual standstill. During the same period 
the economy of our country entered an era of inflation which tre- 
mendously affected building costs when material, labor, and 
funds finally did become available. And during the six-year pe- 
riod of 1947 to 1953, Maryland had an influx of population due 
to defense activity which greatly increased the public school 
enrollment in a number of the counties of the State. The enroll- 
ment increased from 276,627 pupils in 1946-47 to 409,570 in 
1953, or a net gain of 132,943 (48.4 per cent). 

Realizing the urgency of the needs for the school building 
program which faced every local board of education and cogni- 
zant of the inadequate sources of revenue to meet the problem on 
a local level, the State for the first time accepted its responsibility 
and inaugurated a program of State support for school construc- 
tion. During this period, the State's role in assisting its sub- 
divisions to increase and improve school facilities was manifested 
in the passage of a law providing for a school building Incentive 
Fund in 1947, in a direct grant-in-aid of $20,000,000 and a Gen- 
eral Public School Construction Loan of $50,000,000 in 1949, and 
an additional School Construction Loan for $20,000,000 in 1953. 

The following data concerning the building projects, either 
completed or under contract, for the period of 1947-53, indicates 
the extent of the program in each of the counties and in Baltimore 
City: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



Maryland's Public School Building Program 



Completed or 


Under Contract: 


1947-53 




Number School 

X AUJCCbo, i-> C W 

pnrl A a 1 aM^i An<2 


Total 
Cost 


State of Maryland 


506 


$226,656,083 


Baltimore City 


DO 


a a ono oio 
44,oUZ,old 


lotal Counties 


4do 


lol,obo, I l\J 




a 

y 


4,Z57,DDO 


Anne Arundel 


28 


18,901,644 


Baltimore 


51 


41,363,810 




o 

o 


i,ooo,zuy 




1 o 


yzy,uio 




iy 


a, /oy,zio 


Cecil 


13 


3,235,578 


Charles 


19 


2,877,502 




Q 

o 


Q A KA HQ£. 
O,404, / CO 






o,yyb,Zo4 




4 


2,465,204 


Harford 


24 


10,961,552 


Howard 


13 


2,732,171 




1 Q 


i,yzu,oo4 




rr a 

79 


oo rrA A one 

63, 709, 825 


PflTIPP (rPftt'P'p''? 


83 


26 460 544 


Queen Anne's 


9 


1,455,770 


St. Mary's 


6 


1,866,664 


Somerset 


6 


1,367,979 


Talbot 


5 


2,597,396 


Washington 


8 


4,554,787 


Wicomico 


6 


5,855,249 


Worcester 


3 


2,565,478 



In addition to the 6,214 instruction rooms that were built 
during the 1947-53 period, provision was also made for the other 
important aspects of the educational program. To provide a more 
complete educational experience for the child, to safeguard his 
health, and to aid in keeping him physically fit, auditoriums, cafe- 
terias, and facilities for health and physical education were in- 
cluded in many of the schools constructed during this period. 

The total expenditure of $226,656,083 for the school build- 
ing program includes the purchase of school sites at a cost of 
$6,638,502 and equipment at a total cost of $14,661,715. 

The source of funds, amounts received from each source, and 
the percentage of the total cost are as follows: 



24 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



Source 


Amount 


Percentage of 
Total Cost 




$191,547,734 


84.5 


State 


20,008,348 


8.8 


Federal 


15,100,001 


6.7 



The monies borrowed by the counties under the provisions 
of the State Loan Funds of 1949 and 1953 are included under 
local sources, since the State must be repaid with interest. It 
should be pointed out, however, that the money borrowed by the 
counties from the State is secured by the Sherbow funds, which 
are paid to the counties annually. These funds are free money — 
not earmarked for any specific purpose. 

The State Incentive Fund money which is used for debt serv- 
ice is not included in the above tabulations. 

It should also be pointed out that only nine of the subdivi- 
sions of the State were eligible for financial assistance from the 
Federal government under the provisions of Public Law 815, 
which gave aid to those areas in which there had been a great in- 
flux of population due to Federal defense activity. Those counties 
and the amounts received are : Anne Arundel $3,133,051 ; Balti- 
more $2,047,940; Cecil $1,115,481; Charles $687,456; Frederick 
$99,362; Harford $2,921,757; Montgomery $1,886,768; Prince 
George's $2,502,806; and St. Mary's $705,380. 

The willingness on the part of the Maryland citizenry to 
provide modern school facilities for more than 145,000 school 
youth in the past six years is indeed commendable, but the pro- 
gram for the future will require continued support of both the 
local and State governments. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 

The School Lunch Program increased approximately 24 
per cent in the number of participants during the 1952-53 school 
year as compared with 1951-52. Of the 685 schools approved for 
participation, 656 of them operated programs. The cost of the 
meal to the child varied from 20 cents to 30 cents. 

Money for the operation of the program is derived from 
local, State, and Federal sources. During 1952-53 the Federal 
government allocated $680,361.00 for reimbursement for the 
various type lunches. 

Through the State Department of Education the schools in 
the State received commodities in the approximate amount of 
$567,123.66. These commodities are made available as a dona- 
tion by the United States Department of Agriculture from its 
various agricultural support programs and include foods espe- 
cially purchased to improve the quality of the noon-day lunch. 

Detailed breakdowns showing the growth of the program 
from its inception in 1946 to the present time are shown on 
TABLES 113 and 114, pages 164 and 165. 



26 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

Administration and Teacher and higher Education 

The staff of the Division of Certification and Accreditation 
was augmented in August, 1952, by the appointment of an As- 
sistant Director who was given special responsibility for the 
supervision of teacher and higher education. His first activities 
in this field consisted of a study of the qualifications of the staff 
members of the State Teachers Colleges and of the budgets at 
these institutions. He also participated in an evaluation of a 
college which offers a highly restricted program and which 
wished to extend it. Furthermore he began studying the Teachers 
Colleges at first hand. 

Very shortly, the Assistant Director took over the responsi- 
bility of checking applications for approval of colleges, hospitals, 
and secondary schools under Public Law 550, the "Veterans Re- 
adjustment Assistance Act of 1952", and preparing the required 
statements of approval. 

During the year he, together with the Director and the Su- 
pervisor of Certification, devoted considerable time to the work 
of a special committee on teacher supply and teacher prepara- 
tion. With the Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational 
Education as Chairman, the membership of the committee com- 
prised several other members of the Department, as well as rep- 
resentatives of the county superintendents, county supervisors, 
the Baltimore City School Administration, teachers, boards of 
education, the Maryland State Teachers Association, the State 
Parent-Teachers Association, as well as three consultants con- 
sisting of the President of a Teachers College in Virginia and rep- 
resentatives of the U. S. Office of Education and the National 
Education Association. Individual members of the Department 
and a number of subcommittees made detailed studies and reports 
which were considered and in some cases modified by the large 
committee, which agreed on tentative recommendations. The 
final report will be presented to the State Superintendent, who 
will decide which of the recommendations he will endorse for 
possible adoption by the State Board of Education. The commit- 
tee plans to finish its work in 1954. 

During the year the Division, either with the assistance of 
consultants or through the participation of members of the Di- 
vision as members of evaluation teams appointed by the Mid- 
dle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, made 
special studies of a number of institutions. 

In September, 1952, the Assistant Dean of the College of 
Education of Temple University, who had the previous spring 
participated in a committee study of a local school of commerce, 
spent two days with members of this Division and representa- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



tives of the local college to interpret the report of the committee 
and offer additional advice. Later the President and the Comp- 
troller of George Washington University, the Dean of the School 
of Commerce at New York University, and a professor of history 
at Princeton University surveyed another local institution which 
wished to expand its program. In both instances the advice was 
that the institution of higher learning make certain adjustments 
before assuming additional responsibilities. 

Three consultants helped survey a rabbinical college in Bal- 
timore which requested permission to award the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Talmudic Law and Doctor of Talmudic Law. The group 
consisted of the Assistant Director of the American Council on 
Education, a professor of Semitic languages at Johns Hopkins 
University, and an associate professor of philosophy from Ohio 
State University. The recommendation in this case was favor- 
able and the State Board granted the necessary authority. 

The Assistant Director and, in a few instances, the Director 
participated in surveys of two of the State Teachers Colleges and 
two Maryland liberal arts colleges as members of survey groups 
appointed by the Middle States Association or the American As- 
sociation of Colleges of Teacher Education. 

The Assistant Director was a member of a committee which 
developed the Maryland Institute of Public Affairs, initiated by 
the Maryland State Teachers Association. He acted also as sec- 
retary of the Maryland State Fulbright Committee and in this 
capacity handled all the correspondence on the subject with Mary- 
land colleges, processed applications, and participated in the final 
selection of candidates. He has had the further responsibility of 
acting as secretary to the Commission appointed by Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin to study the need for higher education in 
Maryland, the chairman of which is the State Superintendent. 

Certification 

The work of this Division consisted in obtaining transcripts 
of records and evaluating them, in issuing certificates to admin- 
istrators, supervisors, and teachers in the public and nonpublic 
schools, and in participating in interviews and conferences rela- 
tive to certification. 

As will be seen from TABLE 64, page 115, the number 
of certificates issued has steadily increased over the three-year 
period, 1950-51 to 1952-53. The total increase was slightly more 
than 24.6 per cent. The increase in the third year exceeds the 
increase in the preceding year by 3 per cent. The teacher turn- 
over and the need for additional teachers to take care of larger 
enrollments continues to increase. 

A disturbing fact revealed by these figures is that more than 
1,300 of the certificates issued in 1952-53 were substandard ; that 



28 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



is, emergency or provisional or substitute teachers' certificates. 
Immediately before the war these certificates numbered less than 
23. By 1950-51 the number had increased to 818 and by 1951-52 
to 894. An encouraging fact, however, is that 914 of the teachers 
to whom substandard certificates were issued in 1952-53 hold col- 
lege degrees and may with comparatively little additional train- 
ing meet the full requirements for regular certificates. These 
teachers already possess the general cultural background neces- 
sary for successful teaching and need only part or all of the re- 
quired professional training. 

When the Legislature first provided, in 1943, that War Emer- 
gency Certificates might be issued, it was thought advisable not 
to require teachers holding these certificates to qualify gradually 
for full certification. At the time it was expected that the need 
for emergency certificates would diminish within a few years, 
but experience has proved otherwise. The war and its aftermath 
have opened, especially to women, many lucrative fields of en- 
deavor other than teaching; many men who might be teaching 
are in the armed services, and the constantly increasing birth rate 
calls for more and more teachers for these additional children. 

The War Emergency Certificates, which the Legislature au- 
thorized in 1943, were valid during World War II and for six 
months after the War officially closed. Congress declared the 
war ended in April, 1952. Since it would obviously still be neces- 
sary to employ emergency teachers to take care of the ever-in- 
creasing enrollment and to replace teachers who retired or re- 
signed, the State Board authorized the issuance of Emergency 
Certificates on exactly the same conditions on which the War 
Emergency Certificates had formerly been issued. The revised 
by-laws, including one prescribing the contract to be signed by 
emergency teachers, reads as follows : 

BY-LAW 43— EMERGENCY CERTIFICATES 

In order to staff the public schools of Maryland at such times when 
the number of available teachers who are qualified to hold regular Teach- 
ers' Certificates is not sufficient to staff the said public schools, and in 
order to insure that teachers appointed because of such emergency con- 
dition shall not be continued in the service after this condition no longer 
obtains, the State Superintendent of Schools, pursuant to Section 97(12) of 
Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and subject 
to the conditions hereinafter set forth, may issue the following degree and 
nondegree Emergency Certificates for administrative and teaching positions 
for which candidates meeting the usual requirements are not available. 

DEGREE CERTIFICATES 

1. Emergency High School Principal's Degree Certificate, for which 
college graduation and approximately two years of teaching ex- 
perience shall be required 

2. Emergency High School Teacher's Degree Certificate in Academic 
Subjects, for which college graduation and approximately twelve 
semester hours in the subject to be taught shall be required 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



3. Emergency High School Teacher's Degree Certificate in Special 
Subjects, for which college graduation with approximately fifteen 
semester hours in the subject shall be required 

4. Emergency Elementary School Principal's Degree Certificate, for 
which a degree and approximately two years of teaching experience 
shall be required 

5. Emergency Bachelor of Science Degree Certificate in Elementary 
Education, for which a degree shall be required 

6. Emergency Degree Certificates in Vocational Home Economics and 
Vocational Agriculture, for which a degree shall be required, with 
considerable credit in the field in which the certificate is issued 



NONDEGREE CERTIFICATES 

1. Emergency Nondegree Certificate in Special Subjects, for which 
approximately two years of college work with training and ex- 
perience in the special subject, or preparation accepted as being 
equivalent for the purposes of this certificate, shall be required 

2. Emergency High School Teacher's Nondegree Certificate in Aca- 
demic Subjects, for which two years of college work with ap- 
proximately ten semester hours in the subject to be taught shall 
be required 

3. Emergency Nondegree Vocational-Industrial Shop Teacher's Certifi- 
cate, for which at least three years of trade or industrial experience 
beyond apprenticeship in the trade which the applicant is to teach 
shall be required 

4. Emergency Nondegree Elementary School Principal's Certificate, 
for which approximately three years of college or normal school 
training with two years of satisfactory teaching experience shall 
be required 

5. Emergency Nondegree Advanced First Grade Certificate, for which 
three years of college or normal school credit shall be required 

6. Emergency Nondegree First Grade Certificate, for which two years 
of college or normal school credit shall be required 

7. Emergency Nondegree Second Grade Certificate, for which high 
school graduation or equivalent credit shall be required 

These Emergency Certificates shall be valid only for the period in 
which said emergency condition prevails and shall not entitle the holders 
to the tenure provided in Sections 61 and 98 of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland (1951 Edition) and By-Law 13 or to membership in the 
State Teachers' Retirement System of the State of Maryland; provided, how- 
ever, that if a teacher who has tenure and is a member of the Teachers' Re- 
tirement System of the State of Maryland is transferred to a position where 
an Emergency Certificate is necessary, he shall not lose tenure or membership 
in the Teachers' Retirement System during his service on the basis of the 
Emergency Certificate. The usual medical examination by a physician ap- 
pointed by the State Board of Education is not necessary for the Emergency 
Certificate. 



30 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



BY-LAW 13 

All contracts with teachers, both principals and assistants, employed 
after June 1, 1918, shall be in writing and on one of two contract blanks 
furnished by the State Board of Education. For teachers who hold non- 
emergency certificates the blank entitled "Teacher's Contract," the form for 
which follows, shall be used; for teachers who hold emergency certificates, 
the blank entitled "Emergency Teacher's Contract," the form for which also 
follows, shall be used. The contract shall be signed by the teacher and the 
president and the secretary of the county board of education, and when so 
signed shall be filed by the secretary in the office of the board; provided 
teachers employed prior to June 1, 1918, and continuing in the service, shall 
have the contract herein prescribed when they so desire. The following 
shall be the forms of contract and, under the foregoing conditions, no others 
shall be recognized: 

[Copies of both forms of contract may be obtained from the Division 
of Certification and Accreditation.] 

Accreditation 
Academic Schools 

Section 20 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
1951 edition, provides that, with certain exceptions, nonpublic 
schools may operate in Maryland only if they are approved by 
the State Superintendent. 

In 1952-53 there were operating in the State the following 
number and kinds of approved nonpublic academic schools 
below college level, the number of each kind being indicated • 



Types of Schools 1952-53 

Secondary 50 

Tutoring 7 

Special 11 

Elementary 9 

Elementary with nursery school and 

kindergarten 27 

Kindergarten 26 

Nursery School and kindergarten 23 

Nursery School 29 

Total 182 



There were in addition, 15 child care centers with which the 
Department worked on a voluntary basis. 

The situation with regard to nonpublic secondary schools 
and some of the tutoring schools did not change materially during 
the school year. The work of the Division with these schools was 
curtailed because of the death in February, 1953, of the Assistant 
Supervisor of Accreditation in this area. 

The Supervisor of Accreditation who has immediate respon- 
sibility for most of the other schools listed has visited each school 
under her supervision at least once and has visited a few from 
two to five times. 



Maryland State Department of Education si 

More than half the schools had received their certificates in 
1948, when the law became effective. Only two new schools in 
these categories were approved in 1952-53, although a few schools 
changed their location and therefore received new certificates. 
In every case the new quarters and facilities were an improve- 
ment over the previous ones. 

Twelve groups which applied for approval could not qualify, 
usually because they lacked qualified teachers. Some of the groups 
decided to operate as day care centers, without purporting to give 
an educational program and therefore not coming under the au- 
thority of the State Superintendent. In Baltimore City and in 
the counties where certain licensing laws apply to day care cen- 
ters, these groups satisfy local health and fire prevention regu- 
lations. In other counties day care centers operate without su- 
pervision or inspection. 

The certificates of approval issued to six schools which had 
not succeeded in meeting or maintaining certain standards were 
revoked. Two other schools closed voluntarily because they real- 
ized their weakness. Four schools closed for other reasons. 

In most of the schools the enrollment is increasing — in some 
of them as much as two hundred per cent since the certificates 
of approval were issued. 

In view of the shortages of available qualified teachers, it 
has not been possible to require that all the teachers in the non- 
public academic schools meet the requirements for certification. 
As little as two years of academic and professional preparation 
has been accepted as justifying the approval of a school, if other 
requirements are substantially met. 

However, the directors of many of the nonpublic schools have 
come to realize the importance of professional as well as aca~ 
demic training and seek the advice of this office in evaluating 
the qualifications of applicants for teaching positions. In a num- 
ber of the schools teachers with adequate or reasonably good 
preparation have been employed. Some directors and teachers 
have recently registered for and completed courses in preschool 
education. In a few cases parent groups are financing further 
study on the part of the teachers, 

Some of the schools are improving and augmenting their 
equipment, are enlarging their physical facilities, and are offer- 
ing more creative programs than formerly. 

The Supervisor of Accreditation in this area has made a 
comprehensive study of the applications and reports on file from 
the nonpublic nursery schools, kindergartens, and the elemen- 
tary schools. As a result the application form has been revised 
to call for additional data for which need has been found. The 



32 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



study also indicated areas which needed and subsequently re- 
ceived special emphasis. 

In a few instances it was found that through new appoint- 
ments a particular faculty was being weakened instead of 
strengthened, and when it was evident that the situation would 
not be remedied, the school was persuaded to cease calling itself 
a nursery school or kindergarten and become known as a nursery 
or play center or child care center. The Supervisor nevertheless 
continues to work on a voluntary basis with these organizations 
in the hope that certain physical standards will be observed and 
that the programs may be somewhat improved. 

In a few other instances supplementary inspections by the 
Fire Prevention Departments or the Health Departments have 
been requested and, as a result, unsatisfactory physical condi- 
tions have been eliminated. 

The Supervisor has talked with many parent groups, usually 
about the needs of young children and the role of preschools in 
meeting these needs. She has met with individuals and groups to 
discuss ways of improving the schools for which they were re- 
sponsible and has given advice on the opening of new schools. 
In this way it has been possible to anticipate and prevent certain 
difficulties. She has arranged for directors and teachers to visit 
other schools to see good programs in actions. 

Trade and Technical Schools 

The work with nonpublic trade and technical schools during 
this period was concerned largely with the approval of institu- 
tions for the training of veterans under Public Law 550, the 
"Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952", which became 
effective in August, 1952, and which set for the approval of 
schools for the training of Korean veterans standards different 
from those for the approval of schools for the training of World 
War II veterans. All schools which wished approval under the 
new regulations therefore had to file new applications, and these 
were processed on the basis of the new requirements. Applications 
were numerous during the fall and winter of 1952 and by the end 
of the school year forty trade and technical schools had been cer- 
tified for this work. 

The Division devoted considerable time also to a re-evaluation 
and prolonged and intensive supervision of trade and technical 
schools which had been operating for some years. 

The Division continued to supervise private instructors who 
had been approved under the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 
1944. These gave instruction in the correction of speech disorders 
and in music. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



In addition to the schools which were approved for the train- 
ing of Korean veterans, the Division approved sixteen schools 
under the Maryland nonpublic school law. These were in the fol- 
lowing categories: beauty, dance, project supervision, nursing, 
aviation, music, law review, magic, dramatics, gemology, busi- 
ness, and psychoanalysis. 

Twenty-one trade and technical schools closed during the 
year. Six of them were found to be deteriorating and decided to 
cease operations. The others were attracting too few students to 
justify continuance. Among the closed institutions were those 
teaching air conditioning and refrigeration, radio, auto me- 
chanics, Diesel mechanics, building trades, tailoring, aviation, 
dance, art, and music. The headquarters of a correspondence 
school which offered a course in the supervision of projects moved 
to Florida. 

The Division employed three consultants to make a second 
survey of a correspondence course in art, which an earlier com- 
mittee had failed to recommend for approval. The committee 
consisted of local practitioners and teachers of commercial art. 
The outcome of the survey was similar to that of the first study, 
and the director of the course was advised that he must make 
certain changes in the instructional material. 

Consultants were employed also in connection with a school 
for models, which offered more advice about and instruction in 
diet and exercise than the State Superintendent felt justified in 
approving. A leading physiotherapist, a national authority on di- 
etetics, and the State Supervisor of School Lunch studied the situ- 
ation, and as a result the activity in connection with diet and 
exercise was divorced from the school for models, and the State 
Superintendent has tentatively approved the latter operation 
only. 

Two other individuals who had been offering or wanted to 
offer courses in modeling were advised to restrict their instruc- 
tion to the techniques in this field instead of attempting to change 
the size of the individual through diet and exercise. One of the 
two applicants decided to discontinue the course in modeling, and 
the other adjusted the course of study to comply with the rec- 
ommendations of the Division. 



34 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction to county schools, 
groups affiliated with the schools, and State agencies during the 
school year of 1952-53 were of five general types: (1) activities 
relating to curriculum revision; (2) the development of dis- 
tinctive audio-visual materials; (3) the organization and pro- 
motion of programs designed to advance the education of princi- 
pals, supervisors, and parents; (4) the conduct of special studies 
in areas where particularly acute problems revealed themselves ; 
and (5) provision of special services to improve or to interpret 
practices in important areas of the program. 

Development of Curriculum 

Core 

In addition to serving as consultants to county school pro- 
grams on regularly scheduled visits throughout the school year 
and as resource persons in summer workshops and conferences, 
members of the staff of the Division of Instruction took the ini- 
tiative in advancing certain pilot practices and programs. This 
year they began in informal ways to appraise the core program 
which was introduced into those counties beginning the develop- 
ment of junior high schools in 1945. The organization of this 
program varies from county to county. Most of the counties have 
provided a double period in grades seven, eight, and nine in which 
English and social studies are juxtaposed and to some degree in- 
terrelated. One county has developed what is essentially a broad 
fields curriculum in grades seven, eight, and nine. Three counties 
have organized their core programs around certain important 
personal-social problems, and two of these counties are extending 
the core program through the senior high school. Members of the 
Division of Instruction considered plans and possibilities for 
studying the core critically and objectively to determine desirable 
revisions in content and to identify and conserve whatever dis- 
tinctive values it has demonstrated. 

Home and Family Living 

Programs in home and family living are similar to the core 
in that they cut across several of the traditional subject fields. 
In 1951-52 a State Committee on Home and Family Living had 
endeavored to assay the resources in each of the subject fields, 
particularly in home economics, for assuring adequate and ap- 
propriate coverage of all aspects of this basic social area during 
the twelve-grade sequences of subject offerings. Since 1951 a 
number of counties have included aspects of home and family 
living in the secondary school curriculum, and a few schools have 
organized their staffs for the study of possibilities for drawing 
vital content from the experiences children are having in their 
changing roles within the home. With the co-operation of one of 
the State Supervisors of Home Economics, members of the Divi- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



sion of Instruction planned this year to move curriculum revision 
programs in the direction suggested in the new School Adminis- 
trative Manual 1 issued by the State Department of Education in 
June, 1952 : 

"In increasing degree greater value will be realized for more 
pupils if teachers of English, social studies, science, home economics, 
and the arts plan together the total body of educative experiences 
which come within the context of home and family living, neighbor- 
hood and community programs and services, wise use of community 
resources, healthful living, consumer-producer needs, and the organ- 
ization of groups for democratic action and maximum effectiveness." 

Foreign Languages 

The State Committee on Foreign Languages met twice dur- 
ing the year. This committee, representative of foreign language 
divisions in the colleges of the State, county school administration 
and supervision, foreign language instruction in public schools, 
and the State Department of Education sought practical ways of 
extending and improving the teaching of foreign languages 
through implementing a directive in the School Administrative 
Manual expressed as follows : 

". . . in recognition also of the growing national need to come into 
effective communication with diverse peoples scattered throughout 
the world, educational programs, grades one through college, must 
come to rest on broader provisions for language teaching and 
broader concepts of language relationship to the social milieu in 
which the users of the language live." 

At its January meeting, the committee adopted the report 
entitled "The Place of Foreign Languages in the Total School 
Program." This report was issued in mimeographed form in 
February and sent to the county superintendents, teachers college 
presidents, and heads of education departments in Maryland 
colleges and universities. An intercounty workshop to prepare 
teachers for service in pilot programs planned for the summer of 
1953 had to be deferred because the time was insufficient for 
enlisting staffs and administrations in the counties involved. 

Music 

As a result of the planning of the State Committee on Music 
Education in public schools, a workshop was held at State Teach- 
ers College, Frostburg, in June. About fifty music specialists and 
elementary and secondary classroom teachers from sixteen coun- 
ties attended. Miss Margaret Lowry of Queens College and Dr. 
Frances Andrews, of Pennsylvania State College served as con- 
sultants. They organized and directed the workshop program for 
its in-service education values, and at the same time they sought 
to draw out some material that could be used as the basis for a 

i Maryland's Educational Program, School Administrative Manual, Maryland School 
Bulletin, Vol. XXXII, No. 2 Baltimore: Maryland State Department of Education, June, 
1952. 



36 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



bulletin. From the materials produced the consultants and the 
editorial committee selected statements of good practices which 
later might be used as the nucleus of a fully-developed bulletin 
comprehending all types of music activities for graduated levels 
of maturity. The workshop group recommended that (1) there 
be more intercounty visitation in music, (2) an article on the 
workshop be submitted to The Maryland Teacher, and (3) a report 
on the workshop be made to the Maryland Music Educators 
Association during the State Teachers' Association convention 
in October, 1953. 

Art 

The State Committee on Art in the general education pro- 
gram continued to act through an editorial group consisting of 
county supervisors of art, an art instructor from one of the 
State teachers colleges, and representatives of the State Depart- 
ment of Education. This group drew in pupils' art products from 
the various counties of the State to supplement the materials 
which came out of the art workshop held at the State Teachers 
College, Towson, in June, 1952. They formulated criteria for 
determining the content and format of the proposed bulletin and 
proceeded to select for inclusion in the publication art products 
which were most significant as the natural and universal expres- 
sions of the maturation levels of the young artists. 

Atomic Energy 

On April 25, 1953, the State Department of Education and 
the University of Maryland, in collaboration with the United 
States Atomic Energy Commission, sponsored a one-day confer- 
ence on atomic energy at the Universtiy. About one hundred and 
fifty teachers of science, social studies, and agriculture in the 
State attended. Dr. Hubert Alyea of Princeton University spoke 
at the morning session and demonstrated dramatically the tre- 
mendous force released by nuclear fission. Later speakers 
stressed industrial uses of atomic energy and the values of 
isotopes in medicine and agriculture. Since atomic energy makes 
an impact upon every aspect of community life and upon every 
aspect of the curriculum — the sciences, the social studies, and 
the humanities — the Division of Instruction plans to capitalize 
every opportunity to deepen awareness of the significance of 
this force. 

Physical Education 

The State Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 
met in September with the deans of instruction and the teachers 
of physical education in the State teachers colleges to consider 
the preparation of elementary school class room teachers for their 
responsibilities in the areas of recreation, health, and physical 
education. The Supervisor reported that the recommendations 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



on health, physical education, and recreation in the School Ad- 
ministrative Manual are being studied and put into practice in 
the county school systems. 

Curriculum Workshop 

Throughout the year in the Negro schools selected teachers 
developed units in the social studies, science, and the core. The 
workshop held at the State Teachers College at Bowie the latter 
part of June and the early part of July served as a means of 
bringing these programs to culmination for the current year. 
Additional workshop groups began work aimed at the develop- 
ment of curriculum guides in language arts and mathematics. 
Two hundred and three volunteer participants from nineteen 
counties were present to help evolve, from their classroom ex- 
periences with these materials and their consequent evaluations 
and revisions, curriculum guides in these various subject fields. 
Dr. Joseph A. Wiseman of the State Teachers College, Bowie, 
served as consultant for the language arts group ; Dr. James A. 
Fickes of the State Teachers College, Towson, for the social 
studies group ; Dr. John R. Clark, now retired, and Miss Dorothy 
N. Batts of Virginia State College for the mathematics group; 
Dr. Cleveland J. Franks of Morgan State College for the science 
group; and Dr. Morris Appell of Brooklyn College for the core 
curriculum group. 

Development of Audio-Visual Materials 

The State Department of Education and the county school 
system, working co-operatively, just about completed the project 
for the development of new type audio-visual materials related 
to life and conditions in Maryland. Twenty-three portfolio pic- 
ture collections were completed. These depict six aspects of life 
in each county — geographical, historical, occupational and indus- 
trial, social, scenic, and unique. A set of 275 individual pictures 
and scripts on the four sections of Maryland are being assembled 
in the "Pictorial Maryland" collection. Each section contains 
pictures characterizing the six areas mentioned above. Nearly all 
the scripts accompanying the pictures have been completed, but 
the work of editing and revising is still to be done. 

Twenty-seven sets of kodachrome slides depicting various 
aspects of living in Maryland were also completed. Plans were 
made to have some of these made into filmstrips with accompany- 
ing scripts. 

The second bulletin in the Conservation Series, Maryland's 
Sunken Treasure, was issued, and about half the quantity printed 
was sold. The bulletin on Bay resources, Our Underwater Farm, 
will be released in the fall of 1953. The general conservation bul- 
letin, This Is Our Wealth, has been rewritten and will be printed 



38 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



early in 1954. Work has been begun on the bulletins on minerals, 
water and soil. Three others are in prospect — one on wildlife, 
one on forests, and one on human conservation. 

In-Service Education of School Personnel 
Child Study 

This year, the eighth of the child study program, there were 
470 teachers in first-year child study groups, 289 in second-year 
groups, and 286 in third-year groups; a total of 1,045 partici- 
pants. That the first-year group is the largest is probably due to 
the fact that some counties require new teachers to take at least 
one year of child study work. 

Meetings for child study leaders were held in January and 
March at the State Teachers Colleges at Bowie and Towson. 
These were attended by leaders from counties which do not have 
outside consultant service. 

There has been quite a shift in the emphasis in the child 
study program. When first started practically the whole time was 
devoted to the child — how he grows and develops — while little 
time was given to related curriculum practices. Participants in 
the program have continuously asked for more emphasis on 
desirable school procedures and policies. This the consultants in 
the child study program attempted to do this year. 

To some extent supervisors are shifting the responsibility 
for child study groups to interested teachers and principals. 
Since many of these new leaders have not had experience except 
as participants, the State Department of Education recommended 
that the supervisor in each instance continue to lead one child 
study group and to provide training regularly for new leaders 
in this field. 

Language Arts 

This year was marked by much progress in the language arts 
program. The importance of leadership training for effectiveness 
in this field was recognized in every county. Fifteen counties had 
programs of their own with definite workshops and provisions 
for the in-service training of teachers. Dr. Ethel Maney of White- 
marsh Township in Pennsylvania ; Mrs. Marjorie S. Johnson and 
Mr. Thomas A. Edwards of the Reading Clinic, Temple Univer- 
sity ; Dr. Alvin W. Schindler of the University of Maryland ; Dr. 
Russell G. Stauff er of the University of Delaware ; and Dr. Em- 
mett A. Betts of Temple University were among those who were 
used as consultants in the various counties of the State. 

The State Department of Education this year held five two- 
day regional meetings, one at each of the State teachers colleges, 
for all supervisors. At each of these meetings, the following 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



topics were given attention: (1) reading in the total school pro- 
gram; (2) directed reading-study activities in groups of several 
ability levels ; (3) classifying needs in word recognition ; and (4) 
classifying needs in comprehension. The program for each meet- 
ing included planning a directed-reading activity using a variety 
of materials, demonstration of reading with children grouped by 
interests rather than by ability in the reading skill, and discussion 
of word recognition and comprehension problems. 

Principals' and Supervisors' Training 
In many places throughout the country there has been a re- 
surgence of interest in the premise that the principal ought to be 
held responsible for developing the educational program in his 
school and that he ought to be selected and educated for the 
competencies required by this responsibility. This certainly must 
be a consideration in the selection of future elementary school 
principals. There are now more than two hundred nonteaching 
elementary school principals in the State, and next year there will 
be more. This group needs very special help from the State De- 
partment of Education and the county supervisory staffs that 
they may be equipped for professional leadership. Several coun- 
ties have developed promising training programs. Next year an 
inter-visitation program for these principals will be arranged. 
Each visiting principal will spend at least one day with a host 
principal, observing and discussing the work and the com- 
petencies involved. 

From the three regional conferences of principals of Negro 
schools held this year came the decision to launch into a carefully 
planned training program for principals, to be supplemented by 
the assistance of the Southern Education Foundation which is 
supporting the program in the southern states. As enrollments 
increase, facilities expand, and programs enlarge, the job of the 
school principal assumes continuously increasing importance. 
This is recognized all over the South, and the General Education 
Board has given $150,000 for a five-year training program for 
principals of Negro schools. A planning committee to determine 
Maryland's part in this program met several times this year and 
projected a one-week workshop which was held in conjunction 
with the curriculum workshop at Bowie in June. One of the 
problems attacked in this workshop was the kind of relationship 
that must exist between the local supervisor and the supervising 
principal. The leadership role of the principal will continue to 
receive emphasis next year. 

A similar program will be developed for all principals, 
elementary and secondary, Negro and white. This program will 
apply not only to those now serving as principals but also to those 
who potentially have the qualifications for this service. Efforts 
to identify and educate potential principals and supervisors must 
be planned more meticulously and organized more systematically. 



40 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



The in-service education of supervisors must also be ad- 
vanced. In view of the very large and increasing number of un- 
qualified teachers, it becomes essential that the supervisor explore 
and enlist all the agencies that can be brought to bear to increase 
teaching effectiveness. As the shortage of qualified teachers 
comes to affect more and more the secondary school, the special 
subject offerings become involved. The supervisors of secondary 
schools must think in terms of employing resources in teacher 
education that can serve to advance content mastery as well as 
professional skill. The annual supervisors' conferences held at 
the State Teachers Colleges at Bowie and Towson in October 
were devoted to (1) techniques of supervision, (2) evaluation, 
and (3) dissemination of practices found to be effective as in- 
service training programs. 

Pupil Personnel Service and Parent Education 

A four-day conference of supervisors of pupil personnel and 
visiting teachers was held in Annapolis in September. Two of 
these days were devoted to a study of withdrawals of children 
from school before graduation. Many school dropouts show poor 
attendance records from the beginning school years and a large 
percentage of them has repeated grades. Representatives from 
the State Department of Labor and Industry and from the Child 
Labor Division of the United States Department of Labor met 
with the supervisors of pupil personnel. Policies concerning 
returning to school after marriage, work permits, and temporary 
suspensions were discussed. Emphasis was given to working with 
maladjusted children as well as with those with attendance 
problems. 

The parent education program continued to grow. Consult- 
ants from the Institute for Child Study of the University of 
Maryland spent two days of the pupil personnel conference help- 
ing the supervisors learn ways of training lay discussion leaders. 
Many groups prefer professional leadership, while others prefer 
using one of their own group as leader. In the latter case the 
professional people serve as resource persons in the group. The 
Institute for Child Study also conducted a five-day workshop for 
leadership training at the University in July. About thirty-five 
parents and pupil personnel workers attended this conference. 

During 1952-53 there were 114 discussion groups for parents, 
with about 1,251 persons attending the meetings regularly. 
Another 819 parents participated in several of these meetings 
or attended the one-day workshops. Some of the parent groups 
were organized as new groups, while others were continuing for 
the second or third year. Three or four counties organized groups 
for mothers of children entering school in the fall. It is clear 
that discussions on child development are beginning to permeate 
the programs of regular PTA meetings. Consultant service from 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



the Institute for Child Study was furnished to the various 
counties three times during the year by the State Department of 
Education. During each two-week period about 400 parents 
attended the meetings. Parents have requested that these groups 
continue and that consultant service be made available for an- 
other year. 

Special Studies 

Certain studies made during the year, some of them formal, 
some rather informal, served to direct the attention of members 
of the Division of Instruction to problems and critical areas 
within the elementary and secondary school programs. Observa- 
tions made during supervisory visits revealed that the junior 
high school is still an area of critical concern. It is here that 
we are most likely to find large classes, high teacher turnover, 
and a considerable amount of overageness, particularly in colored 
schools. A study of class size was made in secondary schools to 
determine problems principals have in distributing teacher load 
in various subject areas. The study revealed a number of ad- 
ministrative difficulties principals have in assigning teachers and 
organizing classes of reasonable size. The effort to find valid 
ways of measuring all kinds of educational outcomes was con- 
tinued this year. Dr. Paul B. Diederich of the Educational Test- 
ing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, spent seven days visiting 
schools in the State. His chief service was in exploring with a 
few secondary school staffs the possibility of establishing goals 
that are clear, valid, and practicable, and in relationship to which 
the degree of attainment is measurable. He consulted with the 
staffs of these schools on ways of obtaining evidence of the degree 
of success in achieving accepted goals, particularly that kind of 
evidence which is not secured through the use of standardized 
tests. 

The work of the commission studying special education was 
continued through its second year. All the work so far has been 
exploratory. The commission is trying to see the picture in the 
State, to look at it critically, and next year to make evaluations 
and recommendations for changes. The study covers all types 
of educational services for atypical children. 

The State Supervisor of Special Education worked with the 
Director of Certification and Accreditation and the Assistant 
Supervisor of Accreditation who visits private nursery, kinder- 
garten, and elementary schools, in evaluating provisions made 
for the handicapped in such schools. It was decided that the ques- 
tion of granting approval to a regular elementary school which 
wants to set up a special program for one or two children must be 
answered individually. If the school has the facilities, personnel, 
and program to care for the needs of an individual deviate, per- 
mission may be granted. Progress of the child will be watched and 
a careful evaluating made at the end of the year. 



42 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



All the speech teachers from the counties met twice during 
the year to discuss the purpose of speech education in the State 
and to go over common problems. Such meetings offer the only 
opportunity for these teachers to get together for any kind of 
professional growth. 

About $90,000 was expended this year on the program for 
those children who are extremely atypical and for whom regular 
school facilities are not available and another $90,000 for the 
home teaching program. Counties are being urged to spend some 
local money to expand the latter program. 

The Division of Instruction devoted several of its meetings 
this year to the problem of the atypical child, particularly to 
the major problems of identifying the precise nature of the devia- 
tion or deviations and of providing appropriate programs in close 
relationship to the regular class situation in the public school. 
Specifically, some of the problems recognized as needing study 
and solution are : 

1. What shall we do about the fact that some special schools 
have greatly expanded their program because we have 
$600 State aid per child to expend? Shall we re-examine 
our own policy? Shall we have more special classes or 
cottage-type classes in our public schools? Or shall we 
allow things to remain as they are? 

2. What type of program shall we have for mentally-re- 
tarded children in this State? How shall we find these 
children ? How long shall we keep them in an educational 
program? Shall we take only those we think will become 
self-sustaining to some extent? 

3. What program shall we have for gifted children? 

4. What program shall we have for emotionally-disturbed 
children? We are finding more and more children who 
are emotionally disturbed. One county has tried a special 
class for seven children who were too poorly adjusted to 
remain in regular classes. 

5. Should more centers for educating physically-handi- 
capped children be organized.? 

6. What are we going to do about the children who are 
either slow learners or actually mentally retarded at the 
junior high school level, ages fourteen and fifteen? The 
present program is inadequate in many respects. 

Early in 1952 the State Superintendent of Schools had asked 
the Superintendents' Committee on Curriculum and Supervision 
to study the problem of narcotics addiction, particularly as it af- 
fected children of school age, and to make recommendations to 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



the superintendents. The committee recommended that present 
provisions for teaching the causes and effects of alcoholism and 
narcotic addiction be strengthened and improved. This should be 
done within the context of the appropriate subjects — biology and 
social studies — but the present publicity being given to this prob- 
lem should not be used to highlight or dramatize teaching related 
to these practices. The following are significant sentences taken 
from the report of the committee: "It has been pretty well es- 
tablished by now that the problem is serious only in the largest 
metropolitan centers and involves those teen-agers who, because 
of maladjustment, seek the most available means of escaping 
from the requirements of day-to-day living. It is a problem which 
lies within the fields of psychotherapy and psychiatry." 

Special Services 

During the school year 1952-53 the Division of Instruction 
took the initiative in providing several programs and services 
which seemed to be required by current educational developments 
within the State. These were of four kinds : 

1. The development of standards for educational programs 
within the four Maryland State training schools. The law 
provides that members of the State Department of Edu- 
cation serve these four institutions as educational con- 
sultants. In line with this provision, the State Depart- 
ment of Education, on invitation from the State Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare, has been organizing committees 
at irregular intervals to survey educational programs in 
these schools. The Department of Public Welfare thought 
it would be most helpful at this time if the Department 
of Education would establish specific standards covering 
all aspects of the educational program — plant facilities, 
equipment, materials, personnel, and curriculum — which 
would be applicable equally to each of the institutions. 
With the help of a large staff of consultants drawn from 
the Baltimore City and State Departments of Education 
and from other State agencies, this project was com- 
pleted before the end of the school year. 

2. The television series "Your Child in School" was con- 
tinued this year. These programs were planned by a 
State committee consisting of representatives of the 
State Department of Education, the county school sys- 
tems, and Station WMAR-TV in Baltimore. They 
enabled thousands of parents and interested citizens 
virtually to enter into the classroom and to see at close 
range what is going on in the schools of the State. 

3. The development of "Criteria for Selection of Materials." 
This was a project of the Superintendents' Committee 
on Curriculum and Supervision. The State Supervisor 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Repurt 



of School and Children's Libraries and the Director of 
Instruction served as consultants to the committee. 
Twelve specific criteria applicable in the selection of 
reading materials were identified, and additional desir- 
able features to look for in textbooks were set forth. This 
report was immediately in demand from a considerable 
number of school systems from outside the State as well 
as from our own county schools. 

The use of "The Secondary School Organization Report. ,, 
The State Supervisor of High Schools, on request from 
a county, meets with the principals and on the basis of 
the classifications and tabulations required in the organ- 
izational report, makes a first careful analysis of enroll- 
ment data for the coming year. This analysis is essential 
to organizing the school for the most economical and 
effective use of staff personnel and plant facilities. It 
precludes serious imbalance in class sizes and places the 
principal in a position to organize his school in accord- 
ance with sound principles. It is hoped that all the 
county school systems in the State will as a matter of 
fixed policy call upon the State Supervisor of High 
Schools annually for this service. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The program and activities of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension are aimed at improving and increasing library services 
for the public, the schools, the colleges, and the hospitals and 
institutions throughout the State. The members of the Division 
staff work with the public librarians and trustees, the school 
librarians, teachers and administrators, and the institution 
librarians and officers to help them develop and improve the 
usefulness of libraries to Maryland people. They work with indi- 
viduals and local and State organizations to inform them about 
library services, to promote local leadership for establishing 
library systems with financial support which will make adequate 
library service possible, and to let them know the needs for the 
improvement of our present libraries. 

The Division compiles statistics and assembles facts about 
the status of libraries and establishes standards and goals for 
library personnel and services. It lends books and other printed 
materials, as well as audio-visual materials, to supplement local 
library resources and to individuals in areas without public 
library service. In all counties, 73,143 items were loaned last 
year, an increase of 16 per cent over 1951-52 and of 227 per cent 
over 1947-48 which was the first year the Division had an appre- 
ciable budget for materials. Every county has borrowed some 
materials each of the last five years. Only 6 per cent of these 
materials last year went to groups and individuals in areas with- 
out public libraries and 94 per cent to libraries, schools, and State 
institutions. Three-fourths of the adult nonaction loaned was 
from our collection and one-fourth was borrowed by interlibrary 
loan, for the most part from the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

The most important growth was in exhibits by which the 
Division assists schools and public libraries in the selection of 
library materials and shows groups the kinds of materials avail- 
able in libraries. For the second year, the Division assembled 
and made available to the counties two identical exhibits of about 
900 books related to the school curriculum and ranging from pre- 
school through senior high school materials selected nationally 
from the output of all publishers for the Combined Book Exhibit. 
Copies of these lists were purchased in quantity and distributed 
to the counties. The county boards of education, and in some 
counties jointly with the county libraries, displayed the exhibits 
for two weeks or longer. Teachers, librarians, pupils, and parents 
were given opportunity to examine the books and make recom- 
mendations for purchases. In several counties, programs on books 
and reading were given while the exhibits were on display. 

Exhibits of interest to State and local meetings were ar- 
ranged for such organizations as the Maryland Congress of 
Parents and Teachers, the Maryland State Teachers' Association, 
Rural Women's Short Course, the State 4-H Conference, and a 



4G 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



CIO regional educational workshop. A well-stocked bookmobile 
was exhibited all during the Maryland State Fair at Timonium, 
and a folder giving information about bookmobile service was 
distributed to visitors. 



Public Libraries 

The Maryland Public Libraries Law of 1945 made State aid 
available to county libraries and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
of Baltimore as of July 1, 1946. Seven years later, fourteen 
counties and Baltimore City were receiving State aid. A com- 
parison of public library reports for the fiscal years ending June 
30, 1946 and 1953, shows that the fourteen counties which receive 
State aid for county public libraries have the following increases : 

Increase 

1946 1953 Number Per cent 

The book stock of the public 

libraries has increased 247,806 620,539 372,733 150 

The lending of materials from 

the public libraries has 

increased 761,351 3,030,761 2,269,410 298 

The support of public libraries 

has increased $157,017 $793,585 $636,568 405 

Considering all public libraries for the same seven-year 
period the comparison shows that: 

Per cent 
In increase in 
Total counties counties 

The book stock of all public libraries 

has increased by 724,780 400,000 116 

The lending of materials from public 

libraries has increased by 2,407,299 2,307,306 231 

The support of public libraries has 

increased by $1,753,752 $669,869 248 

The increases in the nine counties without State aid are 27 
per cent in book stock, 16 per cent in lending, and 94 per cent 
in support. 

Thirty-six library systems have more than 2,000 service 
points, half of which are in the counties. The fourteen county 
libraries have fifty-one community libraries and seventeen book- 
mobiles. There are fifteen municipal public libraries, including 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore, and six subscription 
public libraries which lend to people paying an annual fee. 

The Maryland General Assembly passed a bill which was 
signed into law by Governor Theodore R. McKeldin on May 6, 
1953. This law adds an annual 10 cents per capita in State aid 
for county public libraries and for the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
of Baltimore beginning July 1, 1954. This money must be used 
for current library operations and not for the purchase of land, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



the erection of buildings, or for debt reduction. The fourteen 
counties and Baltimore City with established libraries, will re- 
ceive $203,053 from the State in 1955 for this purpose. (The 
State aid for books, which was provided in the 1945 law, con- 
tinues.) The current State appropriation for books is $66,132. 
The Assembly also passed a law making the Montgomery County 
Department of Public Libraries eligible to receive State aid as 
of June 1, 1953. 

A Statement of Goals of Public Library Service for Maryland 
was prepared by the Legislative and Planning Committee of the 
Maryland Library Association and was adopted by the Associa- 
tion at its annual convention in October, 1952. Statistics show- 
ing the accomplishments of the public libraries in comparison 
with these goals for books and related materials, circulation, 
financial support, service outlets, and personnel, are shown in 
TABLES 142 and 143, pages 192 and 193. 

The income for all public libraries in the counties is less 
than a million dollars ($863,426), about 62 cents per capita, as 
compared with our goal of $1.50 to $2.50 per capita. The State- 
aided libraries range from 35 cents to $1.93 in operating income. 

All the county libraries have small staffs. None has suffi- 
cient books to meet the varied needs of the communities. They 
average one-half book per capita as compared with our goal of 
one and one-half to two books per capita. 

One county has no public library and eight other counties are 
without countywide library service. More than 200,000 Mary- 
land citizens live in areas where no public library service has 
been started. Contacts are being made in these nine counties 
with community leaders and organizations to promote the estab- 
lishment of library service for all the people. 

Three new branch libraries were opened this year by the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library of Baltimore. New library buildings 
were opened in Bethesda (a branch of the Montgomery County 
Department of Public Libraries) and Mt. Ranier (a branch of the 
Prince George's County Memorial Library) . The Charles County 
Library will soon occupy its new quarters under construction as 
an addition to the County courthouse. The city of Takoma Park 
has plans for a new library building for which the General Assem- 
bly approved a bond issue of $35,000. The Bethlehem Steel 
Company has purchased the Dundalk Company's building and 
given it to Baltimore County for the use of the Dundalk Public 
Library (a branch of the Baltimore County Public Library). The 
Prince George's County Memorial Library added a second book- 
mobile. 

As part of its service to public libraries, the Division of 
Library Extension held two meetings of public library adminis- 



48 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



trators to share information about library practices and to form 
policies for improving services. At one session, a panel discussed 
how they were applying A Statement of Goals of Public Library 
Service for Maryland to their local planning and problems. At 
the suggestion of the Division of Library Extension, many of 
the public library administrators attended the Program Plan- 
ning Institute at Johns Hopkins University under the sponsorship 
of the Adult Education Association of Baltimore. 

The libraries of the Eastern Shore held two in-service train- 
ing meetings for all staff members. Some trustees attended. 
The Supervisor of County and Institution Libraries acted as con- 
sultant and several staff members of the Division of Library 
Extension contributed to the programs and discussions. Similar 
sessions are being planned to meet in the various libraries of 
the Shore. 

School Libraries 

Seventeen counties are spending more than $.50 per pupil 
for school library materials. Of this number : 

4 are spending more than $1.00 

7 are spending $.76 to $1.00 

6 are spending $.50 to $.75 

2 still require matching of funds by local school sources. 

There are 86 full-time high school librarians. Of this num- 
ber 40 are fully qualified and 43 others are in the process of 
becoming fully qualified. 

There are sixteen full-time elementary school librarians in 
Baltimore County. At the end of the 1952-53 school year only 
three of these had 30 semester hours of library science. This, 
however, is not as discouraging as it sounds, in view of these 
facts : 

1. The elementary school library personnel is new. 

2. When it is possible, successful teachers are appointed to 
the position of librarian. 

3. The 13 librarians without full training are attending 
summer school or extension classes, or both. 

4. There are no certification standards for elementary 
school librarians. 

Three counties have school library supervisors: Baltimore, 
Montgomery, and Prince George's. Only one of them is prop- 
erly certified because of our requirement that special super- 
visors have a course in the supervision of their special subjects. 
Only one library school offers such a course and not every 
summer. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



The elementary school supervisors in seven counties are 
asking for assistance in guidance in developing library service in 
their schools. This number does not include the three counties 
with school library supervisors who are developing such pro- 
grams in their own counties. The impetus of the child study 
and language arts programs have made them even more aware 
of the need for a wide variety of material on all levels. They 
want teachers to know what materials there are, how to select 
them, how to use them, and how to spend money appropriated for 
materials to the best advantage. Because of these expressed 
needs, it seems that emphasis next year will be in the areas of 
elementary school library service. 

Library Development in State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for 
the promotion of improved library service in the State-operated 
hospitals, training schools, correctional, and other institutions. 
The responsibility is carried out primarily through the activities 
and advisory services of the Supervisor of County and Institution 
Libraries. 

The Division also lends books and other materials to institu- 
tions, prepares special collections of books for exhibit and evalua- 
tion, and makes available to institutions all the lending and other 
services available to other libraries throughout the State. 

This year extensive programs were undertaken at two insti- 
tutions where interest in library development was most evident — 
Springfield State Hospital (mental) and Boys' Village (juvenile 
training school). Although the two programs are developing 
differently because of the difference in the type of institution, 
it is evident that each is stimulating an interest in and a demand 
for similar activities in other institutions of the same type. 

The library project at Springfield State Hospital has begun 
as a co-operative undertaking involving (1) the hospital staff, 
especially the Staff Library Advisory Committee and the Re- 
habilitation Department which has taken library services as a 
part of its function; (2) the Mental Hygiene Society, which has 
been instrumental in procuring gift funds for new books, volun- 
teers for library ward service, and a mental hygiene training 
program for volunteers; (3) the Division of Library Extension, 
which conducted the reorganization of the library, selected books 
for purchase, given library training to the volunteer and patient 
group, and continues to give general direction as the project 
develops. It is the hope of the Division that the increased use 
of the library made possible by this extension of its services will 
create a recognition of the need for a professional librarian on 
the hospital staff and an adequate budget for books and other 
library materials. Plans are under way for similar projects at 
Crownsville and Eastern Shore State Hospitals. 



50 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



Library development at Boys' Village has been stimulated 
by the participation of members of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension staff in the work of the Department's Committee on 
Educational Standards for the Juvenile Training Schools and by 
the acceptance by the training school staff of the recommended 
standards of library service. This year saw the beginning series 
of programs for the staff in use and evaluation of books and 
other materials for education and recreation. Selected groups 
of books and other materials on various subject areas were dis- 
cussed and evaluated in terms of usefulness in the school ; other 
discussions considered curriculum planning, use of materials in 
vocational and work programs, library activities in the cottages 
and recreational programs, use and sources of films, filmstrips, 
and related materials for educational purposes. A staff member, 
although not an experienced librarian, has been assigned to the 
library. Several hundred new books are being ordered. These 
activities will result in increased library use and more effective 
teaching as the program continues to develop. 

Another library project was initiated this year in the tu- 
berculosis hospitals. The Enoch Pratt Free Library has under- 
taken to provide library service in the tuberculosis building of 
Baltimore City Hospital with funds provided by the Maryland 
Tuberculosis Association. The library will be organized and in 
operation by the fall of 1953. 

It continues to be the aim of the Division of Library Exten- 
sion to stimulate the development of adequate libraries in each 
institution. Except in the tuberculosis hospitals, libraries con- 
tinue to be totally inadequate in the basic necessities of staff, 
books, and satisfactory methods of service to the institution 
population. It is our belief that the activities currently in prog- 
ress will lead to continued improvement. We are encouraged 
this year by the rapid increase in interest and in demand for 
advisory services to believe that continuous contact and willing- 
ness to build with the meager material at hand will result in 
significant progress in future years. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Highlight of the year in the area of vocational rehabilita- 
tion was a workshop held for one week at the State Teachers 
College in Towson, dealing with the problems involved in re- 
habilitating the mentally ill. Dr. Dean W. Roberts, medical 
consultant to the Division, and Dr. Paul V. Lemkau, Chief, 
Division of Mental Health of the State Department of Health, 
planned the program and directed its operation. Dr. Luther E. 
Woodward, Co-ordinator, Community Mental Health Services, 
New York State Department of Mental Hygiene, was the gen- 
eral discussion leader. 

The most significant fact about the workshop was that it 
brought together for the first time personnel from all Maryland 
agencies that work in any way with the mentally handicapped. 
In addition to the entire counseling staff of the Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, there were psychiatrists, social workers, 
pupil personnel supervisors, nurses and teachers from all of the 
State's mental hospitals, State and county health departments, 
State Employment Service, State and county departments of 
education, and the Federal Security Agency. 

The discussion centered around these three topics: 

1. The rehabilitation of the client who has an emotional 
problem in addition to a physical disability 

2. The rehabilitation of the mental patient who has not 
required hospitalization 

3. The rehabilitation of the posthospitalized mental patient. 

Each morning after Dr. Woodward lectured and conducted 
a general discussion, the workshop participants divided into four 
groups, each with a discussion leader, a consultant, and a re- 
corder. 

Each group met separately to analyze methods of case han- 
dling and to draw conclusions relative to referral procedures; 
to discuss and integrate agency co-operation and relations and 
psychiatric and social work consultations; to appraise areas of 
help, and at what point in the process, by psychiatrists, psychi- 
atric social workers, rehabilitation counselors, welfare and health 
departments ; to survey utilization of employment training facili- 
ties in the mental hospitals as well as the occupational therapy 
units, and outside training and placement facilities — any or all 
of these services needed in rehabilitating the mental patient into 
satisfactory employment. Attempts were made to visualize the 
therapies and forces brought to play on the patient in preparing 
and re-educating him with skills, tolerances, and abilities to per- 
form on the job, in gradually emancipating him from the de- 
pendent role in a sheltered set-up, and in building the habits, 
attitudes, and feelings necessary to react normally to himself 



52 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



and other selves. The range of problems of the client and the 
professional skill of all the persons working with the client are 
much too complicated, subject to too many fine differentiations, 
and too detailed to include all the areas of problems and experi- 
ences with which professional workers are concerned in rehabili- 
tating mental patients who are returned to the community. 

Definite feelings were held by psychiatrists, social workers 
in the hospitals, and rehabilitation counselors, the professional 
workers who deal most closely with these patients in the last 
stage of release from institutional care and the new stage of 
adapting to family, home, community, and employer relation- 
ships, that each and all should reach more or less common under- 
standings of the special contributions of each. In this area, there 
are the problems of interpersonal relationships, agreement on 
the proper balance of use of professional skill and aids, and the 
choice of community aids and resources. 

The problems of clients in, or rather, the conditioning of 
clients to an institutional day-by-day living with other patients, 
subject to regulations, routines, regimentation, and dependency 
on doctors, nurses, social workers, and attendants provokes a 
need to be prepared and to develop skills of performance and 
living and working, socially and occupationally in the community. 
The transition period of accepting freedom outside the institution 
and being accepted by the people of the community, friends, 
neighbors, fellow employees, and employers calls for changed 
habits, attitudes, defensive and aggressive behavior. Through- 
out the period of sheltered treatment, these patients, having 
been detached from the pressures of life, need to develop normal 
resistance and resiliency to the pressures of living, and to build 
new tolerances for the home, on the street, in the store, and on 
the job — everyone has to learn the calm, normal reactions to 
jostlings many times during each day. The necessity to under- 
stand and to help patients to meet these needs creates the neces- 
sity of developing in every person who has a hand in aiding these 
people to return to normal living in the home, in the community, 
and on the job an awareness of the diversity, complexity, nicety 
of differentiation, and multiplicity of the problems and technical 
knowledge involved in adaptation. 

These psychological insights and those technical counseling 
techniques are needed by the professional workers at every 
point of readjustment. 

Additional Counselor to Work With the Tuberculous 

An additional counselor began work to increase needed re- 
habilitation services to greater numbers in the various tubercu- 
losis hospitals: Victor Cullen (Sabillasvilie), Mt. Wilson, Mt. 
Pleasant, Eudowood, Henryton, Pine Bluff, and Baltimore City. 
This was made possible with the co-operation of the Maryland 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



Tuberculosis Association, which had assisted in providing the 
first counselor assigned specifically to this group in 1947. 

Publication of New Bulletin "Comeback" 

The publication of a new brochure entitled " Comeback/ ' de- 
scribing services offered by the Division, setting forth the true 
rehabilitation philosophy, citing briefly four years of accom- 
plishments, and giving an illustrated thumbnail sketch of the 
persons who had appeared on our biweekly sustaining television 
program during the year, reported the major services offered to 
disabled people. 

Maryland's Philosophy of Vocational Rehabilitation, devel- 
oped over a period of years by the rehabilitation staff, was pub- 
lished for the first time and is reprinted herewith : 

Maryland's Philosophy of Vocational Rehabilitation 

The stability of any society is measured in terms of the extent to 
which each individual citizen carries his part of the common load. Most 
persons can fulfill their obligation ''normally," but a sizeable number 
are handicapped because of physical or mental disability and must 
have certain assistance from the group if they are to assume their 
proper place in our way of life. 

Vocational rehabilitation is the service that these disadvantaged 
citizens need. It is a program established by government to assist 
disabled persons in securing adequate training and other services so 
that they can be properly placed in substantial employment where 
they will be economic and social assets to their communities. If these 
persons are to make their maximum contribution, however, they must 
be adjusted in jobs which are reasonably permanent and in which they 
can compete, as nearly as possible, on an equal basis with non-disabled 
workers and have the same opportunities for advancement. 

In the conduct of our vocational rehabilitation program for Mary- 
land's handicapped citizens, we have established certain basic princi- 
ples for our guidance and direction: 

1. Service is available to all disabled persons who show definite 
evidence of being vocationally handicapped and who are potentiaUy 
employable. This includes the severely disabled and the homebound. 

2. Every service needed for adequate rehabilitation is rendered 
under the direction of the counselor, utilizing whatever personal and 
private resources are available, and supplementing by public funds 
when and if necessary. 

3. Successful rehabilitation can be acieved only if the disabled per- 
son has a sincere desire to overcome his handicap and if he is willing 
to put forth the required energy and effort. To this end, counselors 
take extreme care to avoid destroying individual initiative and the 
exercise of free enterprise on the part of every client being served. 

4. Vocational rehabilitation workers feel a definite obligation to 
see that public funds which are provided for the program bring a 
fair return to the investor — the taxpayer. Likewise, the public must 
be continually reminded of its responsibility to see that an adequate 
service is maintained and that jobs are made available to rehabilita- 
tion clients. 

Success of the program is to be measured not simply in terms of 
dollars and cents but also in the moral and social well-being of the 



54 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



disabled workers who are given an equal opportunity to contribute 
their proper share. 

Vocational rehabilitation is not, nor can it be made, a self-contained 
program. Its effectiveness depends upon the degree to which its 
activities are correlated and articulated with other social, educational, 
and economic agencies in the State and the local community. 

Completion of Original Plan to Staff District Offices 

The Division assigned a new counselor to Baltimore City 
and to Frederick and Montgomery Counties, completing the plan 
of three counselors working out of each district office serving 
the counties, and nine counselors in the Baltimore City district 
office. 

Experience has proved that disabled persons can be more 
satisfactorily adjusted in their own communities, and in keeping 
with this principle all casework is handled in five district offices, 
located in strategic geographical centers. The central office in 
the State Department of Education restricts its activities to 
general administration and supervision. The twenty-four coun- 
selors working out of the five district offices maintained an aver- 
age case load of 282 from the net live roll of 6,981 during 1952-53. 

Statistical Summary 

Ten years have passed since Public Law 113 was enacted 
by the Congress (July 6, 1943), extending rehabilitation service 
to the mentally handicapped, and making possible the expansion 
of counseling staff to handle larger case loads. A comparison of 
the Maryland program for the year 1952-53 with that of ten 
years earlier shows clearly the progress that has been made : 

1943-4 4 1952-53 

Professional Staff 6 30 

Rehabilitations 355 1,001 

Cases served 1,267 4,288 

Cases referred 1,032 2,463 

Net live roll 1,727 6,981 

Total cost *$56,177 *$510,046 

Annual earnings of rehabilitated . 

group $562,146 $1,971,600 

* Approximately 50-50 ratio between State and Federal funds. 

The earning power of the 1,001 disabled persons who, in 
1953, were rehabilitated into jobs covering most of the standard 
employment classifications shows clearly the tremendous eco- 
nomic significance of vocational rehabilitation. This group 
(1,001) received in wages during their first year at work nearly 
four times as much as the cost of all services rendered to the total 
number (4,288) who received any type of aid involving the 
expenditure of funds. Significant, also, is the fact that the 1,001 
rehabilitants supported with their earnings not only themselves 
but also 1,138 dependents. Another 2,693 clients were inter- 
viewed and registered on the live roll but did not get definitive 
rehabilitation services during the fiscal year. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



TABLE 1 — Opening and Closing Dates: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1953 



County 



Baltimore City 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools, 
September, 
1952 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools, 
June, 
1953 



COUNTY 



Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Date of 
Opening 
Schools, 
September, 
1952 



Date of 
Closing 
Schools, 

June, 

1953 



TABLE 2 — Number Public Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days: Counties of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Schools in Session 


Less Than 180 Days 


Year or 










Countt 


Total 


Two-Teacher 


Three-Teacher 


Graded 




Number 


Elementary 


Elementary 


Elementary 



WHITE SCHOOLS 



1952 


5 




1 


4 


1953 


2 






2 


Charles 


1 






bl 


Prince George's 


1 






cl 


COLORED SCHOOLS 


1952 


2 






2 


1953 


3 


2 




1 


Frederick 


1 


al 






Prince George's 


2 


dl 




ai 



a, 179 days; b, 178 days; c, 177 days; d, 176 days. 



56 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 3— Fall Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and Nonpublic— by Color: 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


ENROLLMENT 


Public and Nonpublic 

Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties* 

Public 

Total State 

Total Counties* 

Nonpublic 

Total State 

Baltimore City 


481,070 
173,248 
307,822 

399,710 
131,854 
267,856 

81,360 
41,394 
39,966 


394,191 
124,205 
269,986 

315,474 
84,498 
230,976 

78,717 
39,707 
39,010 


86,879 
49,043 
37,836 

84,236 
47,356 
36,880 

2,643 
1,687 
956 


328,965 
124,740 
204,225 

260,982 
90,625 
170,357 

67,983 
34,115 
33,868 


268,577 
89,005 
179,572 

203,003 
56,379 
146,624 

65,574 
32,626 
32,948 


60,388 
35,735 
24,653 

57,979 
34,246 
23,733 

2,409 
1,489 
920 


152,105 
48,508 
103,597 

138,728 
41,229 
97,499 

13,377 
7,279 
6,098 


125,614 
35,200 
90,414 

112,471 
28,119 
84,352 

13,143 
7,081 
6,062 


26,491 
13,308 
13,183 

26,257 
13,110 
13,147 

234 
198 
36 



TEACHING STAFF 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


17,435 


14,520 


2,915 














Total Counties* 


5,967 


4,411 


1,556 














11,468 


10,109 


1,359 














Public 




















Total State 


14,369 


11,540 


2,829 


8,114 


6,385 


1,729 


6,255 


5,155 


1,100 


Baltimore City 


4,510 


3,016 


1,494 


2,689 


1,693 


996 


1,821 


1,323 


498 


9,859 


8,524 


1,335 


5,425 


4,692 


733 


4,434 


3,832 


602 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


3,066 


2,980 


86 














Baltimore City 


1,457 


1,395 


62 














Total Counties 


1,609 


1,585 


24 















NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 



Public and Nonpublic 




















Total State 


tl.275 


tl,003 


t272 


1,130 


880 


250 


284 


238 


46 


Baltimore City 

Total Counties* 


t276 


t206 


t70 


240 


179 


61 


53 


43 


10 


|999 


1797 


t202 


890 


701 


189 


231 


195 


36 


Public 


















43 


Total State 


t936 


f680 


t256 


814 


579 


235 


217 


174 


Baltimore City 

Total Counties* 


-j-160 


tioo 


1-60 


130 


78 


52 


35 


27 


8 


1776 


t580 


■j-196 


684 


501 


183 


182 


147 


35 


Nonpublic 




















Total State 


f339 


t323 


tl6 


316 


301' 


15 


67 


64 


3 


Baltimore City 


fH6 


1-106 


no 


110 


101 


9 


18 


16 


2 


Total Counties 


t223 


1-217 


t6 


206 


200 


6 


49 


48 


1 



For basic data see TABLES 16, 17, 18, I, V, and X. 

* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 57 
CHART 1 

Number of Pupils in Public Schools by Color: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore 

City: 1928-1953 



270 



2h0 














210 










/ 

1 

* 

f 




180 










f— 

• 
/ 

/ 

i 




150 






Counties 


• White / 


/ 
/ 




120 _ 














90 . 














60 , 




Baltimore C 


Lty - White- * 








30 . 

- 

19 


Counties - 


Colored 










"Baltimore 


City - Colo 


red 





















1928 1933 1938 191*3 19li8 1953 1958 

Tear 



58 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 4 — Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools: State of Maryland: 

1944-1953 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICf 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



GRAND TOTAL 



1944. 
1945. 
1946. 
1947. 
1948. 
1949. 
1950. 
1951. 
1952. 
1953. 



352,690 
354,210 
356,895 
363, 103 
375,391 
390, 867 
413,731 
441,005 
464,240 
481,070 



152,218 
151,036 
150, 055 
150, 943 
154,450 
156,704 
161,075 
165, 136 
169,320 
173,248 



200,472 
203, 174 
206,840 
212, 160 
220,941 
234, 163 
252,656 
275,869 
294,920 
307,822 



296,984 
296,754 
297,590 
301, 173 
310, 149 
323,403 
343,923 
367,532 
386,724 
399,710 



115,898 
113,821 
112,551 
113, 149 
115,725 
117,476 
121,365 
124,948 
128,682 
131,854 



181,086 
182,933 
185,039 
188,024 
194,424 
205.927 
222,558 
242,584 
258, 042 
267,856 



55, 
57, 
59, 
61, 
65, 
67, 
69, 
73, 
77, 
81, 



706 
456 
305 
930 
242 
464 
808 
473 
516 
360 



36,320 
37,215 
37,504 
37,794 
38,725 
39,228 
39,710 
40, 188 
40,638 
41,394 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



1944 


278,916 


125,751 


153, 165 


233,887 


95,565 


138,322 


45,029 


30, 186 


14,843 


1945 


279,436 


124,062 


155,374 


233,278 


93,472 


139,806 


46, 158 


30,590 


15,568 


1946 


250,226 


108,823 


141,403 


J202,482 


78, 168 


124,314 


47,744 


30,655 


17,089 


1947 


251,821 


108, 906 


142,915 


201,803 


77,725 


124,078 


50,018 


31, 181 


18, 837 


1948 


261,225 


111,486 


149,739 


208, 505 


80, 069 


128,436 


52,720 


31,417 


21,303 


1949 


273,038 


113,904 


159, 134 


218, 173 


81,872 


136,301 


54,865 


32,032 


22,833 


1950 


287,879 


116,996 


170, 883 


230,315 


84,401 


145,914 


57,564 


32,595 


24,969 


1951 


302,040 


119,056 


182,984 


241, 106 


86,019 


155,087 


60, 934 


33,037 


27,897 


1952 


317,556 


121,662 


195,894 


253,061 


88,381 


164,680 


64,495 


33,281 


31,214 


1953 


328, 965 


124,740 


204,225 


260, 982 


90, 625 


170,357 


67,983 


34, 115 


33,868 



TOTAL HIGH 



1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 



73,774 
74,774 
106,669 
111,282 
114, 166 
117,829 
125,852 
138, 965 
146,684 
152, 105 



26,467 
26,974 
41,232 
42,037 
42,964 
42,800 
44,079 
46,080 
47,658 
48, 508 



47,307 
47,800 
65,437 
69,245 
71,202 
75,029 
81,773 
92,885 
99, 026 
103,597 



63,097 
63,476 
J95, 108 
99,370 
101,644 
105,230 
113,608 
126,426 
133,663 
138,728 



20, 333 
20,349 
34,383 
35,424 
35,656 
35,604 
36,964 
38,929 
40,301 
41,229 



42,764 
43, 127 
60,725 
63,946 
65, 988 
69,626 
76,644 
87,497 
93,362 
97,499 



10, 677 
11,298 
11,561 
11,912 
12,522 
12,599 
12,244 
12,539 
13,021 
13,377 



6, 134 
6,625 
6,849 
6,613 
7,308 
7, 196 
7,115 
7,151 
7,357 
7,279 



4,543 
4,673 
4,712 
5,299 
5,214 
5,403 
5, 129 
5,388 
5,664 
6,098 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 

t Grades 7 and 8 were included in the high school beginning in 1946; at this same time the change from an eleven- 
year to a twelve-year system was begun in the public schools of nineteen counties. 
i^For detail, see TABLES II, III, IV, and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



TABLE 5— Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State 

of Maryland: 1944-1953 



Year 


Total 


PuBLICf 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL WHITE 



1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 



289,331 
289,402 
290, 037 
293,926 
303,912 
317,344 
336, 196 
360,258 
380,415 
394, 191 



117,414 
115,289 
113,021 
112,648 
114,688 
116,220 
118,071 
120,646 
122,658 
124,205 



171, 
174, 
177, 
181, 
189, 
201, 
218, 
239, 
257, 
269, 



917 
113 
016 
278 
224 
124 
125 
612 
757 
986 



235,867 
234,054 
232,959 
234,463 
241,251 
252,463 
269,070 
289,473 
305,650 
315,474 



82,709 
79,552 
77,086 
76,471 
77,702 
78,762 
80, 140 
82,165 
83,695 
84,498 



153,158 
154,502 
155,873 
157,992 
163,549 
173,701 
188, 930 
207,308 
221,955 
230, 976 



53,464 
55,348 
57,078 
59,463 
62,661 
64,881 
67, 126 
70,785 
74,765 
78,717 



705 
737 
935 
177 
986 
458 
931 
481 
963 
707 



WHITE ELEMENTARY 



1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 



224,325 
223,858 
198,358 
199,229 
207,227 
217,916 
230,659 
243,916 
258,213 



94,497 
92,309 
79.779 
79,458 
80, 947 
82,871 
84,335 
85,689 
87,176 



129,828 
131,549 
118,579 
119,771 
126,280 
135,045 
146,324 
158,227 
171,037 



268,577 89,005 179,572 203,003 56,379 



181,294 
179,580 
152,630 
151,491 
156,863 
165,402 
175,502 
185,451 
196,258 



65,708 
62,969 
50, 482 
49,707 
51,073 
52,406 
53,280 
54,171 
55,392 



115,586 
116,611 
102, 148 
101,784 
105,790 
112,996 
122,222 
131,280 
140, 866 
146,624 



43,031 
44,278 
45,728 
47,738 
50,364 
52,514 
55, 157 
58,465 
61,955 
65,574 



28,789 
29,340 
29,297 
29,751 
29, 874 
30, 465 
31,055 
31,518 
31,784 
32,626 



WHITE HIGH 



1944 


65,006 


22,917 


42,089 


54,573 


17,001 


37,572 


10,433 


5,916 


4,517 


1945 


65,544 


22,980 


42,564 


54,474 


16,583 


37,891 


11,070 


6,397 


4,673 


1946 


91,679 


33,242 


58,437 


80, 329 


26,604 


53,725 


11,350 


6,638 


4,712 


1947 


94,697 


33, 190 


61,507 


82,972 


26,764 


56,208 


11,725 


6,426 


5,299 


1948 


96,685 


33,741 


62,944 


84,388 


26,629 


57,759 


12,297 


7, 112 


5,185 


1949 


99,428 


33,349 


66,079 


87,061 


26,356 


60,705 


12,367 


6,993 


5,374 


1950 


105,537 


33,736 


71,801 


93,568 


26,860 


66,708 


11,969 


6,876 


5,093 


1951 


116,342 


34,957 


81,385 


104,022 


27,994 


76,028 


12,320 


6,963 


5,357 


1952 


122,202 


35,482 


86,720 


109,392 


28,303 


81,089 


12,810 


7, 179 


5,631 


1953 


125,614 


35,200 


90,414 


112,471 


28,119 


84,352 


13, 143 


7,081 


6,062 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



60 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 6— Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color: State 

of Maryland: 1944-1953 



Year 


Total 


PrjBLicf 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Bpltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL COLORED 



1944 


63,359 


34,804 


28, 555 


61, 117 


33,189 


27,928 


2,242 


1,615 


627 


1945 


64,808 


35,747 


29,061 


62,700 


34,269 


28,431 


2, 108 


1,478 


630 


1946 


66,858 


37,034 


29, 824 


64,631 


35,465 


29, 166 


2,227 


1,569 


658 


1947 


69, 177 


38,295 


30, 882 


66,710 


36,678 


30, 032 


2,467 


1,617 


850 


1948 


71,479 


39,762 


31,717 


68, 898 


38, 023 


30,875 


2,581 


1,739 


842 


1949 


73,523 


40,484 


33,039 


70,940 


38,714 


32,226 


2,583 


1,770 


813 


1950 


77,535 


43,004 


34,531 


74,853 


41,225 


33,628 


2,682 


1,779 


903 


1951 


80, 747 


44,490 


36,257 


78, 059 


42,783 


35,276 


2,688 


1,707 


981 


1952 


83,825 


46,662 


37, 163 


81,074 


44,987 


36,087 


2,751 


1,675 


1,076 


1953 


86,879 


49,043 


37,836 


84,236 


47,356 


36,880 


2,643 


1,687 


956 



COLORED ELEMENTARY 



1944 


54,591 


31,254 


23,337 


52,593 


29,857 


22,736 


1,998 


1,397 


601 


1945 


55,578 


31,753 


23,825 


53,698 


30,503 


23, 195 


1,880 


1,250 


630 


1946 


51,868 


29, 044 


22,824 


49, 852 


27,686 


22, 166 


2,016 


1,358 


658 


1947 


52,592 


29,448 


23, 144 


50,312 


28,018 


22,294 


2,280 


1,430 


850 


1948 


53,998 


30,539 


23,459 


51,642 


28,996 


22,646 


2,356 


1,543 


813 


1949 


55, 122 


31,033 


24,089 


52,771 


29,466 


23,305 


2,351 


1,567 


784 


1950 


57,220 


32,661 


24,559 


54,813 


31, 121 


23,692 


2,407 


1,540 


867 


1951 


58, 124 


33,367 


24,757 


55,655 


31,848 


23,807 


2,469 


1,519 


950 


1952 


59,343 


34,486 


24,857 


56,803 


32,989 


23,814 


2,540 


1,497 


1,043 


1953 


60,388 


35,735 


24,653 


57,979 


34,246 


23,733 


2,409 


1,489 


920 



COLORED HIGH 



1944 


8,768 


3,550 


5,218 


8,524 


3,332 


5,192 


244 


218 


26 


1945 


9,230 


3,994 


5,236 


9,002 


3,766 


5,236 


228 


228 




1946 


14,990 


7,990 


7,000 


14,779 


7,779 


7,000 


211 


211 




1947 


16,585 


8,847 


7,738 


16,398 


8,660 


7,738 


187 


187 




1948 


17,481 


9,223 


8,258 


17,256 


9,027 


8,229 


225 


196 


29 


1949 


18,401 


9,451 


8,950 


18, 169 


9,248 


8,921 


232 


203 


29 


1950 


20,315 


10,343 


9,972 


20,040 


10, 104 


9,936 


275 


239 


36 


1951 


22,623 


11, 123 


11.500 


22,404 


10,935 


11,469 


219 


188 


31 


1952 


24,482 


12, 176 


12,306 


24,271 


11,998 


12,273 


211 


178 


33 


1953 


26,491 


13,308 


13,183 


26,257 


13, 110 


13,147 


234 


198 


36 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



TABLE 7 

Program For Education of Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed with State Funds: 
by Year 1951-52 and 1952-53; by County and Baltimore City, Year Ending 

June 30, 1953 















Transporta- 


Instruction in 


Special 






Total 


Home Teaching 


tion to Regu- 




Schools 
















lar Classes 
























Pup 


ils 




Year and County 
























Pu- 


Expendi- 


Pu- 


Teach- 


Expendi- 


Pu- 


Expendi- 


Baltimore 




Expendi- 




pils 


tures 


pils 


ers 


tures 


pils 


tures 


City Hos- 


Other 


tures 












pital 


Schools 




















Schools 






BY YEAR 


1951-52 


988 


$136,397.50 


548 


201 


$57,572.49 


66 


$5,621.17 


258 


119 


$73,203.84 


1952-53 


1,176 


185,304.83 


661 


264 


63,850.70 


84 


7,017.70 


256 


178 


114,436.43 






BY COUNTY AND 


BALTIMORE CITY, 1952- 


53 






Total State 


* 

1,176 


$185,304.83 


661 


264 


$63,850.70 


84 


$7,017.70 


256 


178 


$114,436.43 


Baltimore City .... 


446 


72,946.48 


237 


14 


16,861.11 


10 


1,228.29 


136 


63 


{54,857.08 


Total Counties .... 


730 


112,358.35 


424 


250 


46,989.59 


74 


5,789.41 


120 


115 


59,579.35 


Allegany 


57 


5,220.03 


24 


11 


2,328.03 


23 


2,292.00 


9 


1 


600.00 


Anne Arundel . . . 


94 


10,257.12 


63 


38 


5,061.90 


6 


255.22 


9 


16 


4,940.00 




*163 


35,805.13 


81 


35 


10, 114.77 


16 


1,000.36 


32 


35 


24,690.00 


Calvert 


3 














3 






Caroline 


7 


460.72 


5 


i 


460.72 






2 






Carroll 


21 


1,452.24 


10 

9 


8 


1,052.24 






9 


2 


400.00 


Cecil 


12 


1,901.72 


11 

6 


1,301.72 






2 


1 


600.00 


Charles 


14 


977.59 


9 


877.35 


i 


100.24 


4 






7 


1,428.13 


6 


4 


1,428.13 




1 






Frederick 


25 


3,428.01 


11 


11 


2,228.01 






12 


2 


1,200.00 


Garrett 


8 


637.50 


3 


3 


175.50 


3 


462.00 


2 




Harford 


*35 


2,704.12 


26 


14 


1,894.60 


1 


9.52 


7 


'2 


800.00 


Howard 


14 


2,728.04 


6 


7 


448.04 






4 


4 


2,280.00 


Kent 


2 


43.68 


2 


2 


43.68 












Montgomery .... 


109 


24,260.48 


65 


30 


6,819.96 




41.17 


5 


38 


17,399.35 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's . . . 


89 


12,946.13 


58 


37 


6,220.63 


19 


1,365.50 


1 


11 


5,360.00 


2 


110.00 












1 


1 


110.00 


St. Mary's 


12 


1,032.31 


12 


3 


1,032131 












Somerset 


*6 


681.98 


3 


4 


548.48 


'2 


133.50 


2 






Talbot 


2 


286.00 


1 


1 


286.00 




1 






Washington 


17 


2,882.12 


10 


1 


2,882.12 






7 








16 


2,477.80 


9 


7 


1, 147.90 


2 


129.90 


3 


'2 


1,200.00 


Worcester 


15 


637.50 


11 


10 


637.50 






4 



















* Total number of pupils excludes one duplicate in both home teaching and transportation in each of the following 
counties: Baltimore, Harford, and Somerset. 

t Includes $95,304.83 spent fromFunds for Handicapped Children to send 178 children to special schools. 

t Includes $19,131.60 paid by State toward the salaries for the instruction of 256 children in Baltimore City Hos- 
pital schools, of whom 136 were from Baltimore City and 120 from the counties. 

Note: These pupils are in addition to those reported in special classes in TABLES 16, 1/, and 18. 



62 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 8 

Special Classes and Highwood School: Baltimore City: Semester Ending June 30, 

1953 



Kind of Class 


Number of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Per Cent of 
Attendance 


PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 


Total and Average 

Hearing Conservation 

Deaf 

Mixed* 


22 
9 
3 
3 
4 
3 


327 
158 
39 
38 
43 
49 


321 
152 
39 
37 
44 
49 


88.3 
93.0 
84.9 
89.0 
86.0 
89.0 


PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 


Total and Average 

Deaf 


10 
5 
3 
1 
1 


162 
93 
45 
13 
11 


162 
95 
44 
13 
10 


85.7 
86.0 
90.0 
84.0 
83.0 


SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 




4 


56 


56 


77.0 


MENTALLY HANDICAPPED WHITE PUPILS 


Special Center 

Shop Center 


93 
56 
3 
34 


1,732 
1,074 
42 
616 


1,749 
1,044 
43 
662 


80.7 
82.8 
76.0 
73.5 


MENTALLY HANDICAPPED COLORED PUPILS 


Shop Center 


85 
49 
2 
34 


1,735 
966 
28 
741 


1,638 
886 
28 
724 


76.6 
83.0 
76.0 
70.9 



* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiencies: orthopedic, 32; sight, 2; 
cardiac, 7; deaf, 2; and hearing, 6. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



03 



TABLE 9 — Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children: Year Ending June 30, 1953 







Number of Pupils 




Total 












Number 


Name and Location 














Kinder- 


Ele- 


Secondary 


Special 


Different 




garten 


mentary 






Teachers 


WHITE 










28 


4 










18 


6 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 




















69 


8 










18 


3 










6 


1 




16 


66 


18 




20 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 


17 


99 


20 




18 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 
















301 


73 




12 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown 




65 


55 




11 


Nursery School for Cerebral Palsy, Baltimore 








25 


4 


Reinhardt School for Deaf, Kensington 








30 


2 


Rosewood State Training School, 














60 


99 






12 










47 


8 










26 


3 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 








33 


4 


COLORED 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie 




47 


10 




8 


Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., Cheltenham 




166 


1 




9 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


5 


30 






6 




7 


19 






8 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



64 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 10— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1943-1952 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Total Resident Bikths in Maryland 



County 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


Total State 


47,353 


43,763 


42,816 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


Baltimore City. . . . 


21,054 


18,830 


17,848 


21,111 


23,992 


22,083 


21,496 


21,382 


22,630 


22,775 


Total Counties .... 


26,299 


24,933 


24,968 


29,622 


32,835 


32,009 


32,552 


34,610 


38,451 


40,390 


Allegany 


1,920 


1,689 


1,724 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


1,824 


1,785 


Anne Arundel. . . 


1,932 


1,857 


1,819 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


2,969 


3,132 


Baltimore 


5,489 


5,112 


5,174 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


Calvert 


317 


280 


312 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 


405 


427 


Caroline 


381 


349 


329 


387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


396 


432 


Carroll 


758 


667 


708 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


818 


1,019 


Cecil 


757 


682 


702 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


801 


901 


Charles 


661 


628 


605 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 


782 


684 


Dorchester 


491 


482 


462 


526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


630 


585 




1,183 


1,087 


1,141 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


Garrett 


504 


464 


424 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 


508 


497 




1,168 


1,171 


1,090 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 




470 


420 


381 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


597 


581 


Kent 


259 


300 


246 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


285 


318 


Montgomery 


2,773 


2,674 


2,694 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


Prince George's. 


3,131 


2,984 


2,992 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


Queen Anne's. . . 


248 


239 


260 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


298 


334 


St. Mary's 


540 


569 


708 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 


916 


881 


Somerset 


393 


374 


357 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


432 


446 


Talbot 


323 


330 


330 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


435 


458 


Washington .... 


1,562 


1,504 


1,467 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


Wicomico 


653 


671 


636 


741 


875 


892 


866 


894 


980 


1,002 




386 


400 


407 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 


565 


587 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



TABLE 11— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1943-1952 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


Total State 


38,749 


35,554 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


Baltimore City. . . . 


16,077 


14,021 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


14,989 


Total Counties 


22,672 


21,533 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 


33,054 


35,157 




1,887 


1,665 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


1,758 


Anne Arundel. . . 


1,487 


1,442 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


2,467 


Baltimore 


5,155 


4,862 


4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


7,382 


Calvert 


147 


116 


156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 


186 




283 


265 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


325 


Carroll 


716 


626 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 


922 


Cecil 


698 


638 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


834 




382 


341 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


387 




318 


318 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


350 


342 




1,067 


979 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 


1,306 


Garrett 


504 


464 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


497 




1,081 


1,059 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 


1,557 




383 


354 


317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


480 


Kent 


156 


210 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


224 


Montgomery 


2,543 


2,459 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


5,794 


Prince George's. 


2,672 


2,532 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


6,430 


Queen Anne's. . . 


177 


170 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


231 


St. Mary's 


336 


388 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


690 


675 




217 


209 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


243 


Talbot 


216 


210 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


293 


Washington 


1,530 


1,479 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 


1,769 




492 


501 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


686 


733 




225 


246 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 


322 



66 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 12— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1943-1952 

Data from Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1943 


1944 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


Total State 


8,604 


8,209 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


13,019 


Baltimore City .... 


4,977 


4,809 


4,540 


5,306 


6,193 


6,669 


6,989 


7,214 


7,692 


7,786 


Total Counties .... 


3,627 


3,400 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 


5,397 


5,233 


Allegany 


33 


24 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


27 


Anne Arundel. . . 


445 


415 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


665 


Baltimore 


334 


250 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


555 


Calvert 


170 


164 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


241 




98 


84 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


107 


Carroll 


42 


41 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


97 


Cecil 


59 


44 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


67 


Charles 


279 


287 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


297 




173 


164 


164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


243 




116 


108 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


132 


Garrett 










3 


1 




1 


1 




Harford 


87 


U2 


96 


iii 


141 


167 


177 


178 


219 


232 


Howard 


87 


66 


64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


101 


Kent 


103 


90 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


94 


Montgomery. . . . 


230 


215 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


319 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


459 


452 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


820 


71 


69 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


103 


St. Mary's 


204 


181 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


206 


Somerset 


176 


165 


158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


203 


Talbot 


107 


120 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


165 


Washington. . . . 


32 


25 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


25 




161 


170 


165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


269 


Worcester 


161 


154 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 


265 



Maryland State Department of Education 67 
TABLE 13 

Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1953 















Withdrawals bt Cob 
















Transferred to 






















County 


Total 


Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


W10 


Wll 


W12 


W14 



elementary 



Total Counties 


18,257 


6,863 


243 


10,441 


57 


22 


156 




25 


29 


390 


27 


2 


2 




736 


413 


12 


267 


4 


1 


2 




1 




36 










1,748 


519 


29 


1,136 


13 


2 


13 




4 


i 


28 










2,755 


883 


46 


1,730 


3 


1 


28 




1 


5 


57 


i 






Calvert 


158 


45 




112 










1 














177 


39 




126 










3 


'2 


6 








Carroll 


347 


113 


'i 


212 


i 




*4 






6 


10 








Cecil 


505 


145 


8 


333 


3 


'i 


1 




3 




11 








Charles 


399 


212 


4 


169 


1 


l 


4 






i 


6 


i 






Dorchester 


170 


65 




9o 


1 


i 


1 




2 




4 


1 






Frederick 


575 


283 


4 


255 


3 










'4 


26 








Garrett 


240 


83 




145 


2 


2* 










8 








Harford 


1,111 


430 




645 


3 




6 






i 


25 










394 


72 




311 


2 


'i 


4 




i 


1 


2 








Kent 


101 


26 




64 




l 






1 




9 










3,475 


1,619 


81 


1,641 


7 




55 




1 


*2 


58 






1 


Prince George's 


3,015 


937 


30 


1,995 


3 


7 


11 




2 




30 










156 


54 


1 


100 




1 


















St. Mary's 


418 


135 


12 


263 




1 


i 








6 








Somerset 


115 


20 




91 


'i 


1 






i 




1 








Talbot 


156 


71 




73 


2 




i 








9 










744 


457 


8 


208 


1 


i 


22 








34 


i3 








491 


183 


7 


273 


6 




2 




*4 


*3 


11 


2 






Worcester 


271 


59 




197 


1 




1 








13 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


9,002 


1,110 


65 


3,121 




186 


15 


149 


128 


3,348 


16 


431 


58 


359 




523 


89 


5 


140 




8 


1 


9 


12 


189 




33 


4 


33 




795 


44 


6 


312 




24 


1 


10 


11 


308 




48 




31 




1,750 


242 


16 


591 




26 


3 


66 


30 


659 


3 


59 


ii 


42 


Calvert 


88 


1 




32 






2 


1 




39 




11 


1 


1 


Caroline 


129 


11 




45 




2 






*2 


49 


'i 


15 


2 


2 


Carroll 


256 


37 


'i 


82 




6 


i 


'6 


1 


104 


2 


11 


1 


3 


Cecil 


292 


27 


4 


109 




3 




5 


2 


115 


2 


14 


4 


6 


Charles 


182 


27 


1 


53 




3 




2 


3 


75 




8 


5 


5 




145 


12 


2 


31 




3 




2 


1 


56 




24 


3 


10 




333 


63 


2 


78 




6 






5 


146 


4 


16 




13 


Garrett 


154 


4 


1 


63 




5 






5 


48 




14 


i 


13 




406 


53 




173 




9 


'2 


'i 


1 


125 




18 


4 


16 


Howard 


194 


10 


*i 


80 




5 




7 


1 


72 




7 


2 


8 


Kent 


71 


7 




20 












34 




2 


1 


7 


Montgomery 


906 


145 


8 


393 




7 


i 


is 


i3 


244 


'4 


34 


3 


33 




1,458 


156 


6 


570 




40 


1 


7 


31 


545 




38 




64 


Queen Anne's 


99 


3 


2 


43 










2 


43 




2 


'i 


3 




124 


6 


4 


57 




3 








44 




7 




3 




115 


9 




30 








'4 




48 




13 


7 


3 


Talbot 


117 


2 




33 




8 




4 


'i 


54 




7 


2 


6 




530 


128 




85 




19 


i 


4 


1 


224 




28 


3 


26 




159 


6 




44 




4 




1 




69 




13 


1 


21 


Worcester 


176 


28 




57 




5 


i 


2 


6 


58 




9 




10 



* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1952-53 the school from which they withdrew. 

t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county; W6 — Armed services; 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county; W8 — Age 16 or over; 

W3 & 4 — Transferred— Outside county; W9— Mental; 

W7 — Committed to institution; W10 — Physical; 

W 13— Death; Wll— Economic; 

W5 — Special case; W12 — Marriage; 

W 14 — Suspended. 



68 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 14 

Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: by Year — Counties 
of Maryland: by County — State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal 



Year 












White Schools 


Colored Schools 


County 












Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1943-44 


36.5 


22.9 


36.1 


24.7 


1944-45 


36.0 


23.1 


36.1 


24.3 


1945-46 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25.5 


1946-47 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1947-48 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23.1 


1948-49 


34.0 


21.6 


34.7 


22.7 


1949 50 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 


1950-51 


33.7 


21.9 


34.7 


21.2 


1951-52 


32.1 


21.5 


33.2 


20.9 


1952-53 


31.4 


21.6 


32.0 


21.2 


BY COUNTY, 1952-53 


Total State 


31.7 


21.5 


32.9 


23.5 




32.3 


20.9 


33.5 


26.3 




31.4 


21.6 


32.0 


21.2 




28.9 


23.0 


32.0 


17.3 




31.8 


22.3 


34.3 


24.9 




32.0 


24.3 


32.1 


21.9 




28.9 


21.0 


32.5 


19.9 




29.8 


18.2 


35.5 


18.7 


Carroll 


31.6 


19.9 


31.1 


19.9 


Cecil 


32.9 


19.7 


32.3 


18.5 




28.7 


19.0 


29.5 


19.8 




27.9 


19.9 


30.8 


26.0 




34.3 


22.7 


33.9 


29.1 




27.9 


20.7 








33.3 


22.5 


36 '.7 


i8.*2 




29.5 


16.8 


31.1 


19.2 


Kent 


30.1 


18.4 


30.7 


19.3 




31.8 


19.7 


32.5 


17.5 




31.6 


22.4 


29.9 


22.4 




29.4 


18.5 


30.5 


19.5 




32.0 


20.1 


30.7 


18.4 




27.7 


18.0 


34.7 


21.3 


Talbot 


29.3 


20.1 


29.7 


20.1 




30.9 


21.7 


29.5 


17.4 




34.0 


23.7 


32.1 


21.0 




29.5 


18.9 


35.7 


22.7 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 15 

Number Enrolled by Grade— Color: Maryland Public Schools: Fall of 1952 



Grade 



Total 



Colored 



TOTAL STATE 



Total 


J399, 050 


J314,916 


J84, 134 


Kindergarten* 


18,252 


13,604 


4,648 


1 „ 


46,206 


36,676 


9,530 
8,868 


2 


40, 392 


31,524 


3 


38,440 


30,280 


8,160 


4 


40, 098 


31,490 


8,608 


5 


37,238 


29,306 


7,932 


6 


33,008 


25,638 


7.370 


7 


31,708 


24,561 


7,147 


8 


28, 104 


22,347 


5,757 


9 


25,841 


21,339 


4.502 


10 


20, 974 


17,596 


3,378 


11 


16, 555 


13,973 


2,582 


12f 


14,077 


12,003 


2,074 




6,107 


3,486 


2,621 


BALTIMORE CITY 


Total 


$131,854 


}84,498 


J47.356 


Kindergarten* 


12,742 


8,316 


4,426 


1 


13,447 


8,339 


5, 108 


2 


13,588 


8,523 


5,065 


3 


11,642 


7, 165 


4,477 


1 


12,396 


7,755 


4,641 


5 


11,344 


7, 199 


4, 145 


6 


9,842 


6,027 


3.815 


7 


9,585 


5,863 


3,722 


8 


8.057 


5,273 


2,784 


9 


7,007 


5,018 


1,989 


10 


5,810 


4,259 


1.551 


11 


4,666 


3,472 


1, 194 


12f 


4,000 


3,087 


913 


Special Classes 


5,678 


3, 109 


2,569 


TOTAL COUNTIES 


Total 


267, 196 


230,418 


36,778 


Kindergarten 


5,510 


5,288 


222 


1 


32,759 


28,337 


4,422 


2 


26,804 


23,001 


3,803 


3 


26,798 


23,115 


3,683 


4 


27,702 


23,735 


3,967 


5 


25.894 


22, 107 


3,787 


6 


23, 166 


19,611 


3, 555 


7 


22, 123 


18,698 


3,425 


8 


20,047 


17,074 


2,973 


9 


18,834 


16,321 


2,513 


10 


15,164 


13,337 


1,827 


11 


11.889 


10,501 


1,388 


12t 


10. 077 


8,916 


1, 161 


Special Classes 


429 


377 


52 



* Includes enrollment in prekindergarten classes, 
t Includes postgraduates. 

I Includes ungraded vocational pupils: 2,050, total; 1,093, white; 957, colored. 



70 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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74 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 20 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Maryland County Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County 




White 


Schools 






Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 


785 


392 


5 


.3 


2.9 


293 


212 


13.2 


9.7 


Allegany 


48 


23 


6 


.2 


3.1 


1 


1 


5.9 


6.3 


Anne Arundel 


109 


53 


8 


.4 


5.0 


67 


42 


20.5 


13.5 


Baltimore 


122 


64 


4 


.3 


2.4 


6 


2 


2.7 


0.8 




5 


1 


6 


.0 


1.4 


10 


10 


9.3 


9.3 


Caroline 


13 


8 


7 


.9 


5.0 


7 


8 


14.6 


15.4 


Carroll 


20 


9 


4 


.3 


2.1 


3 


1 


13.6 


5.3 


Cecil 


57 


30 


12 


.8 


7.5 


3 


7 


9.7 


24.1 


Charles 


3 


3 


1 


.7 


1.7 


28 


24 


17.4 


16.7 




13 


7 


6 


.3 


4.3 


7 


9 


7.1 


13.2 


Frederick 


12 


10 


2 


.0 


1.8 


1 


1 


1.7 


1.5 




7 


7 


2 


.9 


3.5 










Harford 


41 


16 


6 


.0 


2.5 


' '2 


"i 


3.3 


1.5 




14 


8 


6 


.4 


4.1 


9 


5 


14.3 


10.0 


Kent 


21 


6 


16 


.9 


6.0 


7 


8 


17.5 


15.7 


Montgomery 


99 


54 


4 


.2 


2.6 


17 


23 


11.9 


13.9 




101 


50 


4 


3 


2.3 


65 


41 


18.3 


13.2 




1 






0.8 










St. Mary's 


17 


6 


7 


6 


3.2 


'l6 


' 5 


21.9 


l6l9 




21 


12 


14 


3 


9.7 


11 


5 


12.2 


6.0 


Talbot 


7 


2 


5 


3 


1.9 


7 




11.5 






17 


5 


2 





0.7 






22.1 


15^9 


Wicomico 


34 


12 


11 


5 


4.2 


'25 


'18 




4 


5 


2 


5 


3.3 


1 


1 


1.5 


1.0 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



TABLE 21— Boys and Girls Under 19 Years of Age by Age-Color-Sex— Counties of 
Maryland; by Color-Sex — State of Maryland: School Census: October 1952 



Age 


Total Number 
Enumerated 


White 


Colored 


Grand 
Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total State 




















(5-18) 


520, 679 






435,217 






85,562 






Baltimore City 




















(5-18)* 


148, 702 






109,850 






38,852 






Total Counties 




















(5-18) 


371,977 


190,876 


181,101 


325,367 


167,372 


157,995 


46,610 


23,504 


23, 106 


Total Counties 




















(18 or Under). 


542,659 


278,250 


264,409 


475,043 


244,229 


230,814 


67,616 


34,021 


33,595 


18 


15,856 


8,213 


7,643 


13,403 


6,983 


6,420 


2,453 


1,230 


1,223 


17 


18,512 


9,606 


8,906 


15,880 


8,289 


7,591 


2,632 


1,317 


1,315 


16 


19,966 


10,289 


9,677 


17, 136 


8,836 


8,300 


2,830 


1,453 


1,377 


15 


20,683 


10,575 


10, 108 


17,934 


9,209 


8,725 


2,749 


1,366 


1,383 


14 


22,355 


11,436 


10,919 


19,230 


9,887 


9,343 


3,125 


1,549 


1,576 


13 


22,577 


11,486 


11,091 


19,408 


9,883 


9,525 


3,169 


1,603 


1,566 


12 


24,539 


12,546 


11,993 


21,069 


10,791 


10,278 


3,470 


1,755 


1,715 


11 


26,245 


13,274 


12,971 


22,828 


11,575 


11,253 


3,417 


1,699 


1,718 


10 


30,230 


15,511 


14,719 


26,467 


13,594 


12,873 


3,763 


1,917 


1,846 


9 


31,652 


16,346 


15,306 


28,074 


14,466 


13,608 


3,578 


1,880 


1,698 


8 


30,956 


15,722 


15,234 


27,334 


13,873 


13,461 


3,622 


1,849 


1,773 


7 


30,623 


15,762 


14,861 


27,017 


13,938 


13,079 


3,606 


1,824 


1,782 


6 


37,456 


19,255 


18,201 


33,364 


17,243 


16, 121 


4,092 


2,012 


2,080 


5 


40,327 


20,855 


19,472 


36,223 


18,805 


17,418 


4,104 


2,050 


2,054 


4 


37,342 


19, 181 


18,161 


32,795 


16,866 


15,929 


4,547 


2,315 


2,232 


3 


36,128 


18,485 


17,643 


31,661 


16,221 


15,440 


4,467 


2,264 


2,203 


2 


35,669 


18,228 


17,441 


31, 123 


15,957 


15,166 


4,546 


2,271 


2,275 


1 


32,483 


16,763 


15,720 


28,759 


14,913 


13,846 


3,724 


1,850 


1,874 


Under 1 . . . 


29,060 


14,717 


14,343 


25,338 


12,900 


12,438 


3,722 


1,817 


1,905 



* Baltimore City figures from Police Census. 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent of Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, by School Attendance 
— Public, Nonpublic, No School : Counties of Maryland : School Census : October 1952 







Number 


Per Cent 


County 


Total 




In Non- 






In Non- 








In Public 


public 


Not in 


In Public 


public 


Not in 






School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


Total Number and Per Cent 
















1946 


167,998 


145,318 


17,382 


5,298 


86.5 


10.3 


3.2 


1948 


180,356 


155,693 


20,434 


4,229 


86.4 


11.3 


2.3 


1950 


206,959 


180,566 


24,409 


1,984 


87.2 


11.8 


1.0 


1952 


234,700 


204,254 


29,033 


1,413 


87.0 


12.4 


0.6 


Allegany 


13,455 


11,604 


1,797 


54 


86.2 


13.4 


0.4 


Anne Arundel 


19, 175 


17,302 


1,671 


202 


90.2 


8.7 


1.1 




46,259 


37,092 


8,950 


217 


80.2 


19.3 


0.5 




2,518 


2,423 


62 


33 


96.2 


2.5 


1.3 


Caroline 


2,982 


2,952 


5 


25 


99.0 


0.2 


0.8 


Carroll 


6,659 


6,281 


337 


41 


94.3 


5.1 


0.6 


Cecil 


5,706 


5,293 


376 


37 


92.8 


6.6 


0.6 


Charles 


4,949 


4,533 


348 


68 


91.6 


7.0 


1.4 




4,043 


3,997 


7 


39 


98.9 


0.2 


0.9 




9,499 


8,691 


740 


68 


91.5 


7.8 


0.7 




4,055 


3,883 


161 


11 


95.7 


4.0 


0.3 


Harford 


8,505 


8,026 


420 


, 59 


94.4 


4.9 


0.7 


Howard 


4,383 


3,718 


625 


40 


84.8 


14.3 


0.9 


Kent 


2, 105 


2,062 


28 


15 


98.0 


1.3 


0.7 


Montgomery 


30,413 


24,850 


5,458 


105 


81.7 


18.0 


0.3 


Prince George's 


34,795 


29,940 


4,734 


121 


86.1 


13.6 


0.3 


2,374 


2,329 


40 


5 


98.1 


1.7 


0.2 


St. Mary's 


5,043 


2,583 


2,357 


103 


51.2 


46.8 


2.0 




3,064 


3,026 


3 


35 


98.8 


0.1 


1.1 


Talbot 


3,079 


2,949 


121 


9 


95.8 


3.9 


0.3 




12,443 


11,741 


643 


59 


94.3 


5.2 


0.5 




5,674 


5,498 


132 


44 


96.9 


2.3 


0.8 


Worcester 


3,522 


3,481 


18 


23 


98.8 


0.5 


0.7 



78 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 24 — Number and Per Cent of White Children, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive, by School 
Attendance — Public Nonpublic, No School : Counties of Maryland : School Census : 

October 1952 







Number 


Per Cent 


County 


Total 




In Non- 






In Non- 








In Public 


public 


Not in 


In Public 


public 


Not in 






School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


Total Number and Per Cent 


















1946 


141,557 


121,031 


16,675 


3,851 


85.5 


11 


8 


2.7 


1948 


152,515 


129,887 


19,656 


2,972 


85.2 


12 


9 


1.9 


1950 


177,353 


152,480 


23,508 


1,365 


85.9 


13 


3 


0.8 


1952 


204,200 


175, 137 


28, 095 


968 


85.8 


13 


7 


0.5 




13,255 


11,404 


1,797 


54 


86.0 


13 


6 


0.4 


Anne Arundel 


15,406 


13,681 


1,622 


103 


88.8 


10 


5 


0.7 


Baltimore 


42,989 


33,889 


8,925 


175 


78.8 


20 


8 


0.4 




1,266 


1,196 


62 


8 


94.5 


4 


9 


0.6 




2,270 


2,251 




14 


99.2 





2 


0.6 


Carroll 


6,304 


5,931 


336 


37 


94.1 


5 


3 


0.6 


Cecil 


5,330 


4,920 


375 


35 


92.3 


7 





0.7 


Charles 


2,716 


2,534 


169 


13 


93.3 


6 


2 


0.5 




2,715 


2,689 


7 


19 


99.0 





3 


0.7 




8,687 


7,893 


735 


59 


90.9 


8 


4 


0.7 


Garrett 


4,055 


3,883 


161 


11 


95.7 


4 





0.3 


Harford 


7,552 


7,087 


419 


46 


93.9 


5 


5 


0.6 




3,612 


2,981 


602 


29 


82.5 


16 


7 


0.8 


Kent 


1,471 


1,438 


24 


9 


97.8 


1 


6 


0.6 


Montgomery 


28,602 


23,071 


5,452 


79 


80.7 


19 





0.3 




30, 046 


25,324 


4,637 


85 


84.3 


15 


.4 


0.3 




1,727 


1,683 


40 


4 


97.5 


2 


.3 


0.2 


St. Mary's 


3,597 


1,715 


1,816 


66 


47.7 


50 


.5 


1.8 


Somerset 


1,845 


1,823 


3 


19 


98.8 





.2 


1.0 


Talbot 


2, 117 


1,996 


117 


4 


94.3 


5 


.5 


0.2 


Washington 


12, 192 


11,491 


643 


58 


94.2 


5 


.3 


0.5 




4,272 


4, 112 


130 


30 


96.3 


3 


.0 


0.7 




2, 174 


2, 145 


18 


11 


98.7 





.8 


0.5 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 25— Number and Per Cent of Colored Children, Ages 9-15 Years Inclusive, by School 
Attendance — Public, Nonpublic, No School: Counties of Maryland : School Census: 

October 1952 







Number 


Per Cent 


County 


Total 




In Non- 






In Non- 








In Public 


public 


Not in 


In Public 


public 


Not in 






School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


School 


Total Number and Per Cent 
















1946 


26,441 


24,287 


707 


1,447 


91.8 


2.7 


5.5 


1948 


27,841 


25,806 


778 


1,257 


92.7 


2.8 


4.5 


1950 


29,606 


28, 086 


901 


619 


94.9 


3.0 


2.1 


1952 


30, 500 


29, 117 


938 


445 


95.5 


3.1 


1.4 


Allegany 


200 


200 






100.0 






Anne Arundel 


3,769 


3,621 


'49 


99 


96.1 


1.3 


2.6 




3,270 


3,203 


25 


42 


97.9 


0.8 


1.3 


Calvert 


1,252 


1,227 




25 


98.0 




2.0 




712 


701 




11 


98.5 




1.5 


Carroll 


355 


350 


"i 


4 


98.6 


'6!3 


1.1 


Cecil 


376 


373 


1 


2 


99.2 


0.3 


0.5 




2,233 


1,999 


179 


55 


89.5 


8.0 


2.5 




1,328 


1,308 




20 


98.5 




1.5 


Frederick 


812 


798 


' '5 


9 


98.3 


0.6 


1.1 


Garrett 
















Harford 


953 


939 


' i 


13 


98^5 


'b'.i 


'i'.i 




771 


737 


23 


11 


95.6 


3.0 


1.4 


Kent 


634 


624 


4 


6 


98.5 


0.6 


0.9 




1,811 


1,779 


6 


26 


98.3 


0.3 


1.4 




4,749 


4,616 


97 


36 


97.2 


2.0 


0.8 




647 


646 




1 


99.8 




0.2 


St. Mary's 


1,446 


868 


54 i 


37 


60.0 


37 A 


2.6 


Somerset 


1,219 


1,203 




16 


98.7 




1.3 


Talbot 


962 


953 


' *4 


5 


99.1 


OA 


0.5 


Washington 


251 


250 




] 


99.6 




0.4 


Wicomico 


1,402 


1,386 


' 2 


14 


98.9 


o.i 


1.0 




1,348 


1,336 




12 


99.1 




0.9 



80 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 27 — Handicapped School Attendants, Ages 7-15 Years Inclusive: 
Counties of Maryland: School Census: October 1952 



County 


Handicapped School Attendants 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 1946 


1,288 


1,135 


153 


1948 


1,699 


1,514 


185 


1950 


2,260 


2,021 


239 


1952 


2,748 


2,421 


327 




477 


474 


3 




203 


175 


28 


Baltimore 


334 


306 


28 


Calvert 


29 


15 


14 


Caroline 


25 


21 


4 


Carroll 


71 


68 


3 


Cecil 


49 


48 


1 




37 


24 


13 


Dorchester 


28 


13 


15 


Frederick 


89 


83 


6 


Garrett 


40 


40 




Harford 


142 


131 


ii 


Howard 


51 


51 




Kent 


53 


26 


27 


Montgomery 


319 


292 


27 


Prince George's 


323 


262 


61 




22 


20 


2 


St. Mary's 


25 


21 


4 




86 


36 


50 


Talbot 


53 


41 


12 




204 


204 




Wicomico 


29 


21 


"8 




59 


49 


10 



82 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 28— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools by Color-Sex- Year, 
1944-1953: by Color-Sex-County and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Year 


White 


Colored 


County 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 



BY YEAR 



1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


718 


271 


447 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


755 


279 


476 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1947 


7,443 


3,244 


4, 199 


937 


357 


580 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1949 


6, 191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1950 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 


1951 


7,382 


3,391 


3,991 


906 


400 


506 


1952 


7,968 


3,725 


4,243 


910 


409 


501 


1953 


8,609 


4,084 


4,525 


1,086 


491 


595 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1952-53 



Total State 


11,444 


5,452 


5,992 


1,912 


804 


1,108 


Baltimore City. . . 


2,835 


1,368 


1,467 


826 


313 


513 


Total Counties . . . 


8,609 


4,084 


4,525 


1,086 


491 


595 




818 


388 


430 


14 


7 


7 


Anne Arundel . . 


517 


228 


289 


101 


50 


51 


Baltimore 


1,427 


657 


770 


106 


34 


72 




54 


25 


29 


29 


13 


16 


Caroline 


136 


72 


64 


31 


12 


19 


Carroll 


314 


125 


189 


8 


4 


4 


Cecil 


239 


102 


137 


26 


14 


12 


Charles 


117 


56 


61 


47 


23 


24 




172 


84 


88 


40 


27 


13 


Frederick 


458 


222 


236 


29 


18 


11 




189 


90 


99 








Harford 


352 


178 


174 


38 


17 


2i 




125 


64 


61 


33 


13 


20 


Kent 


74 


32 


42 


33 


15 


18 


Montgomery*. . 


1,076 


534 


• 542 


70 


32 


38 


Prince George 'st 
Queen Anne's . . . 


1,245 


615 


630 


164 


66 


98 


96 


46 


50 


33 


10 


23 


St. Mary's 


86 


41 


45 


35 


15 


20 




84 


36 


48 


67 


33 


34 


Talbot 


106 


50 


56 


40 


25 


15 


Washington .... 


620 


292 


328 


18 


13 


5 




199 


97 


102 


70 


26 


44 


Worcester 


105 


50 


55 


54 


24 


30 



* Includes 18 boys, 9 girls, graduates of 1953 summer school, 
t Includes 16 boys, 5 girls, graduates of 1953 summer school. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



TABLE 29— Number and Per Cent of High School Graduates Who Entered State 
Teachers Colleges Fall After Graduation: Counties of Maryland — 1944-1950: 
State of Maryland— 1951-1953 





High School Graduates 


Entrants to State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 


Year 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 








Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE GRADUATES 



1944 


6,550 


2,493 


4,057 


15 


72 


0.6 


1.8 


1945 


6,531 


2,545 


3,986 


23 


118 


0.9 


3.0 


1946 


6,809 


2,641 


4, 168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


1947 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


1948 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


1949 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


1950 


4,385 


2, 148 


2,237 


51 


113 


2.4 


5.1 


1951* 


10,378 


4,905 


5,473 


92 


198 


1.9 


3.6 


1952* 


10,678 


5,059 


5,619 


141 


219 


2.8 


3.9 


1953* 


11,444 


5,452 


5,992 


120 


293 


2.2 


4.9 


COLORED GRADUATES 


1944 


718 


271 


447 


6 


32 


2.2 


7.2 


1945 


755 


279 


476 


5 


37 


1.8 


7.8 


1946 


740 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3.0 


5.9 


1947 


937 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3.1 


6.7 


1948 


889 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2.0 


6.4 


1949 


780 


342 


438 


19 


66 


5.6 


15.1 


1950 


415 


187 


228 


5 


23 


2.7 


10.1 


1951* 


1,723 


691 


1,032 


18 


117 


2.6 


11.3 


1952* 


1,674 


682 


992 


25 


142 


3.7 


14.3 


1 953* 


1,912 


804 


1,108 


20 


162 


2.5 


14.6 



* Increase due to inclusion of JBaltimore City graduates and entrants to Coppin State Teachers College 



Eighty- 



-Seventh Annual Report 



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85 



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County 


Total State: 
Per Cent 


Baltimore City* . . 


Total Counties: 

Number _ 

Per Cent 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 


Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery.... 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



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92 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 38— Number of Pupils* in Each Year of Maryland County 
High Schools: 1944-1953 



Year 




Grade 


Ending 
June 30 


Total 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


Post- 
graduate 



WHITE PUPILS 



36,797 
37,154 
37, 154 
54,886 
56,524 
59,500 
65,312 
74,321 
79, 199 
81,034 



12,025 
12,445 
13,576 
14,624 
16, 138 
16,600 
17,988 



11,667 
12,448 
12,950 
14,010 
15,428 
16,728 
16,647 



12, 124 
12,314 
12,314 
6,613 
10,960 
11,863 
12,677 
13,947 
15,037 
15,528 



9,764 
9,842 
9,842 
8,043 
5,571 
9,718 
10, 866 
11,603 
12,463 
12,318 



8,065 
8,201 
8,201 
8,846 
7,166 
5,045 
8,582 
9,461 
10, 053 
9,914 



6,833 
6,783 
6,783 
7,629 
7,897 
6,314 
4,505 
7,728 
8,307 
8,627 



COLORED PUPILS 



083 
138 



7,624 
8,173 
8,853 
9,766 
11,264 
12,090 
12,425 



1,015 
1,238 
1,608 
1,821 
1,993 
2,519 
2,875 
3,203 



818 
1,823 



128 
340 
448 
548 
828 
850 



1,957 
1,804 
1,590 
1, 186 
1,829 
1,857 
2, 124 
2,227 
2,235 
2,367 



1,333 
1,518 
1,475 
1, 178 
639 
1,481 
1,551 
1,774 
1,771 
1,676 



1,004 
1,016 
1, 198 
1,178 
999 
521 
1,214 
1,212 
1,403 
1,236 



789 
799 
803 

1,021 
969 
833 
435 
984 
977 

1,093 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Beginning 1953 figures represent June net roll. For number in individual high schools see TABLE 
XXII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 39 

Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses: Maryland County High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County 


English 


7t 


8t 


9f 


10f 


lit 


12t 


Other* 


Grand Total 


21,069 


20, 022 


18,869 


15,474 


12,293 


10, 118 


3,370 





WHITE 





18,005 


17,063 


16,353 


13,628 


10,879 


8,942 


3,253 


Allegany 


1,345 


1,295 


1,290 


1,230 


1,022 


859 


200 


Anne Arundel .... 


1,436 


1,357 


1,237 


918 


709 


553 


76 


Baltimore 


3,796 


3,357 


3,187 


2,515 


1,850 


1,477 


1,161 


Calvert 


151 


114 


106 


96 


69 


55 




Caroline 


237 


210 


218 


216 


159 


141 




Carroll 


713 


642 


586 


497 


415 


320 


105 


Cecil 


503 


462 


424 


350 


298 


247 






257 


240 


230 


202 


161 


121 






307 


261 


238 


238 


215 


168 


25 


Frederick 


787 


821 


848 


705 


494 


474 


21 




314 


369 


337 


268 


199 


200 


70 


Harford 


763 


680 


589 


491 


415 


364 


72 


Howard 


351 


274 


254 


205 


188 


133 


90 


Kent 


155 


138 


163 


115 


94 


79 




Montgomery 


2,265 


1,990 


1,944 


1,533 


1,331 


1,099 


505 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's 


2,467 


2,297 


2,256 


1,883 


1,628 


1,317 


518 


183 


178 


155 


137 


126 


99 


11 


St. Mary's 


146 


148 


166 


144 


121 


90 






201 


172 


156 


145 


111 


85 


id 


Talbot 


209 


170 


193 


173 


157 


113 






1,198 


1,256 


1,175 


1,080 


725 


635 


230 






413 


362 


288 


238 


202 


159 


Worcester 


22 i 


219 


239 


199 


154 


111 





COLORED 



rotal Counties 


3,064 


2,959 


2,516 


1,846 


1,414 


1,176 


117 


Allegany 


26 


20 


17 


18 


18 


14 




Anne Arundel. . . . 


409 


364 


324 


238 


174 


117 




Baltimore 


419 


353 


265 


156 


135 


116 


39 


Calvert 


126 


118 


90 


48 


40 


32 




Caroline 


90 


70 


59 


54 


41 


35 




Carroll 


47 


49 


32 


21 


19 


11 




Cecil 


46 


37 


46 


21 


18 


28 




Charles 


229 


163 


157 


105 


96 


51 




Dorchester 




138 


103 


90 


72 


44 




Frederick 


44 


102 


70 


41 


57 


32 


64 


















Harford 


99 


88 


85 


86 


6i 


42 




Howard 


96 


78 


70 


60 


42 


34 




Kent 


73 


56 


61 


49 


29 


35 






208 


169 


141 


108 


104 


79 




Prince George's. . . 


566 


501 


384 


285 


190 


171 


ii 




73 


80 


71 


48 


34 


35 




St. Mary's 


95 


81 


77 


41 


32 


36 






140 


112 


116 


98 


81 


68 




Talbot 


102 


85 


77 


67 


34 


43 






34 


19 


27 


22 


17 


20 








137 


124 


106 


68 


75 






142 


139 


120 


84 


52 


58 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

t Includes 1,055 taking Journalism; 1,291 taking Public Speaking; and 1,024 taking Dramatics. 



94 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



Psy- 
chology 


iO<NCO--<CNCOTt<CCCOCN 
Ni-i05NOllNO)0-*0 


Business 
Training X 


Js, ,_,,_< ,_, 1-1 CO CN <N 


Geog- 
raphy 


oooitocooi>-*coooco 
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Econom- 
ic Geog- 
raphy 


to co io o o c o a oo © 


Econom- 
ics and 
Sociology 


TfCilO00COT*r-ft^CNH> 

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ihhWCC (NONfNCO 


Econom- 
ics and 
Consum 
Education 


L0r)<00O05HClOC<:C0 


Problems 

of 
Democ- 
racy 


OhOOOON^AO 
CCCCtfiOOCOt^OiCO-* 


United 
States 
History 


OiCJOOO^Hl^rfCC'-iCO 
lO-H^NCOCJCCNOOO 
N^iO'HINCOO'^'O^ 

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Early 


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World 
History 


6,228 
6,511 
6, 134 
4,597 
3,824 
8,291 
11,006 
10,198 
10,609 
11,396 


Civics 
and 


Social 
Studies 


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Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 41 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies: Maryland County 
High Schools: by Year, 1948-53, and by County: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Year 

AND 

County 


So 
Stu 

<V 
T3 
c3 

O 

A 

i> 


;ial 
dies 

-i— 

0) 
T3 
c4 

o 

00 


Civics and Social 
Studies 


World History 


European History 


United States 
History 


Problems of 
Democracy 


Geography 


Economic 
Geography 


Sociology 


Consumer 
Education 


Negro History 


Personal Problems 
and Psychology 


Business Training! 


1947-48 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 




1948-49 


1,827 


2,312 


1,606 


1,092 


15 


858 


383 


186 


214 






141 


45 


77 


1949-50 


1,995 


2,446 


1,704 


1, 191 


18 


1,072 


499 


294 


128 






87 


130 


104 


1950-51 


2,452 


2,461 


1,765 


1,406 


16 


1, 156 


729 


320 


123 


129 


34 


112 


379 


59 


1951-52 


2,882 


2,818 


1,944 


1,205 


20 


1,407 


831 


170 


189 


139 


8 


70 


361 


36 


1952-53 


3,064 


2,959 


2, 144 


1,352 


58 


1,410 


907 


206 


282 


158 


24 


39 


294 


112 



BY COUNTY, 1952-53 



Allegany 


26 


20 


17 




15 


32 




















409 


364 


324 


68 




144 


26 






47 










Baltimore 


419 


353 


265 


153 




147 


116 
















Calvert 


126 


118 


92 


24 




46 


21 
















Caroline 


90 


70 


59 


53 




41 


35 












i7 




Carroll 


47 


49 


32 


21 






30 
















Cecil 


46 


37 


46 


21 




is 


28 












28 




Charles 


229 


163 


157 


74 




96 


51 




















138 








72 






ioi 


iii 










Frederick 


44 


102 




4i 




57 


32 
















Garrett 






























Harford 


99 


88 


85 


66 




6i 


42 




56 












Howard 


96 


78 


70 


43 




42 


32 
















Kent 


73 


56 


61 


49 




29 


35 
















Montgomery 


208 


169 


141 


29 




104 


22 




24 








4i 




Prince George's. . . 


566 


501 


384 


245 




190 


171 










39 






Queen Anne's 


73 


80 


71 


48 




34 


35 
















St. Mary's 


95 


81 


77 


54 




25 


30 


















140 


112 


116 


98 




81 


68 




24 








123 


35 


Talbot 


102 


85 




67 


43 


34 






77 








43 




Washington 


34 


19 


27 


22 




37 


















Wicomico 




137 




92 




68 


75 


124 






24 




is 


77 




142 


139 


120 


84 




52 


58 












24 





* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 

X Includes classes taught by teachers certified in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject appear 
in TABLE 45. 



96 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



OS 00 iC CO (N 
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Science 


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Science 


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8th Gradet 


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CM t> -CM"*©"^ OS O CO i-i i-i CM i-i lO • CM CM 



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CM CO • i-l (M CM .-h 



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cooocoeocotor-ieocDoeoeqtNi-iioneoiHeoeooo 

COi-lb- i-ti-H CM i-l ffiijt CO i—i 



b-CMCO IO • •COU3 

N(Df CO • -lOi-H 



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ooaooooae4HcoooooHTi*f ^^iooooon 

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00rt<C500iO'- i r^Ol't-r-. IQC0 COO> CO<OCO<-<b>^< 00O 
© © — i CM>OCOCMCMCOCO»OCMt-(T^CO»-li-(rHr-l©COrH 



*t^t^-^02CM©OSi-'OOC5©Tj<050COOOOCCM©t--COC5 
3K3iOHC*KKCXC«NnCCNrfNNMHH 
NCOCOi-iCM©^CMCNCMeOCCCMi-'©00i->i--'i-ii->©'<fCM 



CO©Oi-Ht^CMOl>t^©'*CO'-nC ■ lO 00 »0 i-H OS b- • i 

ic co os »~ cc — b- 1~ o cm >-i cc io co -0000^000 ■ 1 

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132 

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KhO 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 43 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science: Maryland County High 
Schools: by Year, 1948-53, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Science 



Year and 
County 




1947-48 


1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


181 


1948-49 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 


549 


156 


279 


33 


1949-50 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1, 190 


57 


157 


581 


307 


92 


61 


1950-51 


1,557 


1,733 


1,919 


1,673 


130 


201 


771 


403 


172 


92 


1951-52 


2,241 


2,230 


2, 128 


1,553 


225 


250 


697 


356 


123 


19 


1952-53 


1,965 


2,166 


2,398 


1,612 


310 


103 


679 


379 


57 


50 



BY COUNTY, 1952 53 



Allegany 


26 


20 


17 


18 








16 






Anne Arundel. . . 






318 


238 


16 




123 


24 




28 


Baltimore 


419 


353 


265 


151 


132 




41 


24 






Calvert 


126 


118 


86 


32 








19 


20 






90 


71 


59 


53 






4i 








Carroll 


47 


49 


32 


21 














Cecil 


46 


37 


46 


21 






is 








Charles 


229 


163 


90 


106 






12 








Dorchester 




138 


101 


88 






62 




23 




Frederick 


44 


102 


70 


29 






14 




14 




Garrett 






















Harford 


99 


88 


85 


86 






22 










96 


80 


33 


58 






26 








Kent 


73 


56 


61 


49 






64 








Montgomery. . . . 




169 


140 


54 






29 








Prince George's 


84 


55 


393 


197 






22 


36 






Queen Anne's. . . 


73 


83 


71 


29 






34 








St. Mary's 


95 


81 


77 


45 








is 






Somerset 


140 


123 


106 


98 






32 


41 






Talbot 


102 


85 


77 


28 






34 


43 






Washington 


34 


19 


27 


22 






37 








Wicomico 




137 


124 


106 






68 


66 








142 


139 


120 


83 


69 






54 







* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIII. 
X If given in other than 7th and/or 8th grades. 



98 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



TABLE 45 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and Business Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-53, and by County, Year 
Ending June 30, 1953 





Mathematics 
















itics 
















l-H 










© 

V 

© 


g 
© 














03 
O 


CO 




>> 










= 






Year and 












met 


>> 

u 

© 




00 
.« 




!s 


© 

'•3 


H- 
tt 

O 


County 


© 


© 


a 


s 




8 


a 




"oS 


eJT3 
C © 


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( }ra 


era] 
[ath 


era! 
[ath 


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s 


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duoj 






00 


Gen 


Gen 


Algc 


c 
3 


H 




Mat 


r 


Con 


fl<5 


o 


1947-48 


1,612 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 




5S 


344 


356 




422 


229 


1948-49 


1,819 


2,229 


1,396 


123 


1.001 


311 




35 


329 


176 




380 


386 


1949-50 


1,995 


2,331 


1,467 


187 


1,028 


330 




14 


394 


145 




556 


474 


1950-51 


2,471 


2,500 


1,459 


382 


1,153 


449 




19 


325 


513 




584 


656 


1951-52 


2,877 


2,823 


1,742 


116 


959 


287 




79 


353 


551 




632 


1,017 


1952-53 


3,069 


2,928 


2,186 


172 


1,010 


311 




9G 


451 


324 




354 


1,723 



BY COUNTY, 1952-53 





26 


20 






17 








11 






Anne Arundel. . . 


409 


363 


325 


18 


43 


32 


"24 


32 


18 




199 


Baltimore 


424 


353 


222 




164 


60 


31 


41 


42 


17 


167 


Calvert 


126 


118 


52 


"i9 


40 


17 










18 




90 


36 


35 


60 


20 




* *9 


' 9 




33 




Carroll 


47 


49 


32 






'l2 




18 




21 




Cecil 


46 


37 


46 












28 


39 




Charles 


229 


163 


157 


'32 


'44 


'12 




'21 




8 


201 


Dorchester 




139 


101 


7 


28 


14 




44 






39 


Frederick 


' 44 


102 


70 




14 


14 




18 






41 


Garrett 


























* 99 


88 


' 85 


20 


'30 






42 


39 




'22 


Howard 


96 


77 


70 




36 












172 


Kent 


73 


56 


61 




29 


'12 




35 




'28 




Montgomery. . . . 


208 


169 


60 


'16 


41 


15 






iio 


59 


i23 


Prince George's. . 


566 


501 


357 




98 


23 




40 


30 


29 


553 


Queen Anne's . . . 


73 


83 


71 




55 


14 








48 




St. Mary's 


95 


81 


77 




54 


25 




30 






24 


Somerset 


140 


113 


116 




105 






50 


24 


33 




Talbot 


102 


85 


38 




4 


' 9 








39 




Washington 


34 


19 


27 




37 








'22 






Wicomico 




137 


64 




88 


22 


32 


43 






*63 


Worcester 


142 


139 


120 




63 


30 




28 






101 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 41. 



100 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 46 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1944 to 1953 



Latin 



Boys 



1,767 
1,825 
1,721 
1,412 
1,282 
1,364 
1,684 
1,575 
1,563 
1,727 



Girls 



2,927 
2,986 
2,629 
2,227 
2,042 
2,086 
2,436 
2,369 
2,437 
2,476 



French 



Boys 



719 
877 
915 
903 
832 
786 
937 
968 
1,008 
1,117 



Girls 



1,652 
1,645 
1,738 
1,652 
1,541 
1,295 
1,356 
1,492 
1,468 
1,521 



Spanish 



Boys 



384 
452 
446 
526 
455 
559 
720 
792 
927 
1,071 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland County 
High Schools: by Year, 1948-53, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Year and 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


County 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947-48+ 


23 


29 


22 


59 


1 


20 


1948-49+ 


16 


18 


45 


103 


4 


36 


1949-50} 


22 


28 


90 


106 


13 


32 


1950-5 It 


28 


49 


63 


136 


25 


68 


1951-52+ 


30 


43 


78 


137 


31 


90 


1952-53 + 


33 


40 


130 


186 


25 


88 



BY COUNTY, 1952-53 



Anne Arundel. . 


12 


11 


26 


25 


12 


74 


Baltimore 






18 


22 






Calvert 






6 


15 






Charles 






8 


16 






Dorchester 






11 


15 






Howard 






17 


9 






Montgomery. . . 






6 


22 






Prince George's. 






13 


35 






Talbot 






24 


20 






Washington 






1 


7 






Wicomico 


2i 


29 











* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 
+ Figures include duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1953 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 48— White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1944 to 1953 





Ind 


USTRIAL 




Home Economics 


Year Ending 












June 30 






Agriculture 








Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1944 


8.904 


1,083 


2,014 


9,776 


2,888 


1945 


8,813 


1,072 


1,511 


9,689 


2,841 


1946t 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947f 


14,090 


1,227 


2, 110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948f 


15,414 


1, 119 


2,629 


16, 165 


1,596 


1949f 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950t 


21,619 


1,488 


3, 199 


18,989 


2,532 


1951f 


24,739 


1,538 


4, 174 


20,667 


2,560 


1952f 


25,988 


1,499 


3,480 


23,399 


2,032 


1953 f 


28,479 


1,332 


2,965 


24,963 


1,829 



TABLE 49 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics : Maryland County High Schools : by Year, 1948-53, and by County, 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Industrial 




Home Economics 


Year and 












County 






! Agriculture 








Arts 


Education 




General 


Vocational 


1948f 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949f 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 


1950f 


2,099 


204 


1,083 


2,929 


1,023 


1951f 


2,815 


341 


1,265 


3,333 


1, 168 


1952+ 


3,567 


269 


1,023 


3,538 


1, 130 


1953f 


3,635 


390 


990 


3,927 


999 



BY COUNTY, 1952-53 



Allegany 


45 






19 


23 


Anne Arundel .... 


357 


123 


59 


475 


145 


Baltimore 


466 


18 




491 




Calvert 


127 




63 


159 


44 


Caroline 


78 




43 


34 


106 


Carroll 


75 






49 


25 


Ce-il 


88 






69 


39 


Charles 


183 




lis 


143 


75 




124 




34 


145 


49 




155 






106 


41 


Garrett 












Harford 


209 






139 


si 


Howard 


96 




58 


97 




Kent 


104 




43 


95 


58 


Montgomery 


176 


127 


25 


196 


46 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne a 


478 


122 


190 


728 


59 


166 




80 


74 


104 


St. Mary's 


34 




72 


91 


58 




315 






302 




Talbot 


106 




80 


134 


37 


Washington 


66 






73 






187 




57 


275 




Worcester 






71 


33 


39 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any. 

For 1953 enrollment in individual schools see TABLE XXIII. 



102 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 50— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools : Years Ending June 30, 1944 to 1953 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1944 


7,743 


11,362 


1,888 


2,298 


12,501 


14,695 


1945. 


7,654 


11,217 


1,782 


2, 199 


12,507 


14,457 


1946t 


15,304 


18,981 


7, 104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 


1947 t 


16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948f 


19, 624 


22, 866 


10, 058 


10, 058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949f 


21,929 


24, 141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950f 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30, 049 


29,236 


1951f 


26,806 


29,276 


12,889 


12,853 


34,094 


32,955 


1952f 


28,275 


30,650 


15,339 


15,253 


35,768 


34, 101 


1953f 


29,325 


31,470 


16,769 


16,327 


38,375 


35,954 



TABLE 51 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-53, and by County, Year 
Ending June 30, 1953 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948f 

1949f 

1950f 

1951t 

1952 t 

1953f 


3,017 
3,322 
3,552 
4,624 
4,951 
5,063 


3,584 
3,844 
4,051 
5, 133 
5,421 
5,310 


823 
1,217 
1,301 
1,601 
1,656 
1,742 


777 
1,054 
1, 166 
1,712 
1,732 
1,716 


3, 154 
3,717 
4, 147 
5,046 
5,409 
5,710 


3,503 
4,354 
4,504 
5,656 
6,004 
6,271 



BY COUNTY, 1952-53 



Allegany 


49 


46 






15 


11 


Anne Arundel. . 


576 


657 


327 


127 


641 


752 


Baltimore 


691 


640 


468 


446 


712 


720 




170 


189 






198 


212 


Caroline 


170 


176 


53 


36 


172 


171 


Carroll 


87 


92 


12 


18 


87 


92 


Cecil 


60 


69 






88 


108 


Charles 


263 


341 


lis 


154 


334 


438 


Dorchester 


148 


149 






226 


220 


Frederick 


176 


170 


2i 


23 


176 


169 


Garrett 














Harford 


24 i 


220 


53 


46 


24 i 


220 


Howard 


174 


159 


53 


43 


195 


186 


Kent 


136 


145 






147 


154 


Montgomery. . . 


128 


134 


3i 


103 


222 


351 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


733 


817 


379 


532 


874 


1,010 


166 


178 


56 


49 


166 


178 


St. Mary's 


165 


197 


18 


9 


113 


152 


Somerset 


227 


229 






312 


305 


Talbot 


182 


160 






186 


183 


Washington 


66 


73 


ii 


39 


66 


73 




168 


191 






235 


275 


Worcester 


287 


278 


lis 


9i 


304 


291 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes duplicates, if any, and enrollment from junior high school classes (7, 8, 7-8) in addition to 
last four years as previously reported. 

For 1953 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIII. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



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104 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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105 



TABLE 54 — Enrollment in Driver Education and Training: Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Enrollment in Driver 




Enrollment in Driver 




Education and Training 




Education and Training 


County 






County 








Total 


Boys J Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



Total 


4,003 


1,577 


2,426 


Allegany 


239 


97 


142 


Anne Arundel 


303 


132 


171 




728 


268 


460 


Caroline 


74 


29 


45 


Carroll 


105 


38 


67 


Cecil 


86 


21 


65 


Dorchester 


98 


75 


23 



Garrett 

Harford 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



119 


49 


70 


439 


202 


237 


481 


165 


316 


502 


157 


345 


137 


73 


64 


255 


72 


183 


259 


120 


139 


178 


79 


99 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Anne Arundel 

Caroline 

Howard 



437 


177 


260 


45 


27 


18 


24 


11 


13 


65 


18 


47 



Montgomery. 
Prince George 

Talbot. 

Wicomico. . . . 



27 


18 


9 


121 


35 


86 


49 


19 


30 


106 


49 


57 



106 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Counties: 1948 
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113 



TABLE 62— Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standard 
Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1950-1953* 



Ttpe of Certificate 



Grand Total 

Nursery School and 

Kindergarten 

Elementary 

120 Semester hours 

Junior High (Core) 

High School 

Total High School 

Agriculture 

Art 

Commerce 

English 

Foreign Language (any) 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Library Science 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Education: 

Men 

Women 

Science: 

All Sciences 

General Science 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Social Sciences 

Speech 



1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


737 


208 


777 


211 


679 


171 


681 


150 


50 




75 




38 




44 




126 


62 


156 


109 


224 


73 


253 


86 


101 




98 




73 




78 




460 


146 


448 


102 


344 


98 


306 


64 


20 


4 


30 


5 


10 


5 


12 


1 


12 




20 


3 


21 




21 




9 




7 


2 


9 


*3 


9 


' .3 


67 


"l7 


51 


18 


57 


15 


42 


6 


13 


3 


16 


7 


16 


2 


13 


1 


24 


15 


33 


7 


19 


9 


23 


8 


28 


6 


32 


3 


27 


2 


28 


4 


'38 


"7 


*23 


' *4 


'ii 


' '9 


i.3 


"5 


17 


12 


28 


3 


30 


9 


34 


7 


79 


27 


66 


11 


40 


13 


31 


6 


21 


13 


24 


10 


14 


5 


11 


3 






15 




21 








27 


"'6 


5 


"7 


2 


* i 


'ii 


"2 


10 


10 


7 


1 


5 


1 


4 




8 




2 




2 




1 




3 




1 




1 




3 




83 


26 


85 


'21 


56 


24 


50 


'18 


1 




3 













• Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first major). 



114 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 63— County Teachers in Service October, 1952, Who^Attended Summer 
Schools and Evening Classes : Spring and Summer 1952 





Teachers in Service Oct. 1952 Who 
Attended School in 1952 




Number of Teachers 


County 


Total 


Number 


Per Cent 


School Attended 








Num- 
ber 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 




Total | Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White . . . 


1,507 


785 


722 


17.2 


18.9 


Allegany 


78 


28 


50 


10.0 


16.7 


Anne Arundel. . 


89 


47 


42 


13.2 


14.8 


Baltimore 


308 


185 


123 


21.7 


19.0 


Calvert 


15 


6 


9 


19.3 


32.1 


Caroline 


16 


11 


5 


19.3 


8.1 


Carroll 


59 


29 


30 


20.0 


19.1 


Cecil 


30 


9 


21 


7.7 


18.3 


Charles 


25 


11 


14 


16.9 


22.2 


Dorchester. . . . 


10 


6 


4 


8.2 


5.6 


Frederick 


56 


24 


32 


13.9 


17.6 


Garrett 


40 


18 


22 


18.4 


27.5 


Harford 


47 


27 


20 


14.6 


13.9 


Howard 


31 


13 


18 


16.5 


21.9 


Kent 


20 


9 


11 


22.5 


26.8 


Montgomery . . 


378 


230 


148 


31.7 


29.3 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


143 


69 


74 


10.5 


14.5 


14 


5 


9 


11.6 


19.6 


St. Mary's 


10 




10 




25.0 


Somerset 


9 


6 


3 


12^6 


6.4 


Talbot 


15 


4 


11 


8.0 


22.4 


Washington . . 


77 


30 


47 


10.6 


17.2 




21 


12 


9 


11.3 


14.7 


Worcester 


16 


6 


10 


10.0 


18.2 



Total 1,507 



University of Maryland. . 
Johns Hopkins University. 
George Washington Univ. . 

Towson S. T. College 

Columbia University ...... 

West Virginia University. 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Delaware .... 

Western Maryland College 
Shepherd S. T. College . . . 

New York University 

Temple University 

Catholic University 

Loyola College 

Wilson Teachers College . . . 
Fairmont Teachers College 
University of Pittsburgh. . . 

Bucknell University 

American University 

University of Michigan. . . . 
University of Colorado .... 

University of Virginia 

Duke University 

Syracuse University 

Peabody College 

University of Pennsylvania 
One Hundred Twenty 
Others 



1,507 


785 


722 


612 


321 


291 


99 


74 


25 


78 


43 


35 


66 


66 




57 


25 


32 


52 


17 


35 


50 


11 


39 


45 


23 


22 


43 


10 


33 


33 


27 


6 


17 


6 


11 


14 


4 


10 


14 


3 


11 


14 


7 


7 


12 


8 


4 


10 


8 


2 


10 


6 


4 


10 




10 


9 


'4 


5 


9 


2 


7 


8 


3 


5 


7 


3 


4 


6 


1 


5 


6 


2 


4 


5 


2 


3 


3 


1 


2 


218 


108 


110 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored. . 


367 


184 


183 


25.5 


30 


5 


Allegany 


1 


1 




16.7 






Anne Arundel. . 


37 


21 


'l6 


24.1 


25 


S 




34 


11 


23 


14.7 


33 


s 




11 


4 


7 


13.3 


31 


8 


Caroline 


5 


1 


4 


6.7 


22 


2 


Carroll 


4 


2 


2 


22.2 


25 





Cecil 


7 


2 


5 


22.2 


50 





Charles . .' 


20 


10 


10 


18.2 


25 


6 


Dorchester .... 


12 


8 


4 


25.0 


18 


2 


Frederick 


9 


6 


3 


35.3 


21 


4 
















Harford 


20 


' 5 


15 


25.0 


62 


5 




12 


6 


6 


31.6 


31 


6 


Kent 


7 


4 


3 


25.0 


18 


7 


Montgomery . . 


55 


32 


23 


59.3 


52 


3 


Prince George's 


40 


26 


14 


23.0 


15 


7 


Queen Anne's. . 


5 


1 


4 


6.7 


23 


5 


St. Mary's 


14 


7 


7 


30.4 


36 


.8 




19 


9 


10 


32.1 


35 


.9 


Talbot 


17 


9 


8 


34.7 


40 





Washington . . . 


3 


2 


1 


33.3 


12 


5 


Wicomico 


10 


5 


5 


12.5 


21 


7 




25 


12 


13 


44.4 


52 






New York University 

Morgan State College 

Temple University 

Columbia University 

Howard University 

Catholic University 

University of Pennsylvania . 

Hampton Institute 

Virginia State College 

Pennsylvania State College 
University of Delaware 

University of Maryland 

Syracuse University 

Storer College 

American University 

Cornell L T niversity 

Boston University 

University of Pittsburgh. . 

Ohio State University 

University of Michigan 

Loyola College 

Johns Hopkins University. 
Twenty Others 



367 


184 


183 


99 


52 


47 


70 


53 


17 


34 


16 


18 


31 


8 


23 


16 


5 


11 


14 


6 


8 


14 


3 


11 


12 


8 


4 


6 


2 


4 


6 


2 


4 


5 


5 




5 


4 


'i 


5 


1 


4 


3 


3 




3 


1 


'2 


3 




3 


2 


*2 


y 


2 


2 




2 




'2 


2 


2 




1 


1 




1 




'i 


31 


'8 


23 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 64 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1950-51, 1951-52, 
1952-53 



Grade of Certificate 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1950-51 



1951-52 



Total Number of Certificates Issued . 



Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel II 

Supervision of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas . 
Visiting Teacher 



County Librarian . 



High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Permits — Foreign Exchange Teachers . 



Elementary 

Principal , 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching , 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 



Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching . 

Non-degree 

High School Teaching 

Elementary School Teaching . 



Provisional Certificates . 



Substitute Teachers' 

Degree 

Non-degree . . . . 



Certificates 



2,312 



18 



19 
393 
315 

51 
121 

54 



47 
371 
7 
9 
30 
17 



175 
387 



16 
173 



40 



2,549 



11 
371 
306 
85 
78 
42 
3 



31 
494 
32 
28 
22 
19 



239 
426 



220 
51 



116 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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1952 


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Carroll 

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118 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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120 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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122 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 71 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland County Schools: 1944-1953 



New to Counties 



Number 



Per Cent 



Change 
in 

Number 

of 
Teach- 
ing Posi- 
tions 
October 
to 

October 



Number New to County Who Were 



In- 
experi- 
enced 



Sub- 
stitutes 



Experienced 





In 




From 




But 


Counties 


From 


Other 




New 


But Not 


An- 


Type 




to 


Teaching 


other 


School 


Otherf 


State 


Preced- 


County* 


in Same 




ing Year 


County* 





WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1943-44. . 


521 


19.4 


+42 


165 


10 


215 


131 


49 


5 


47 


1944^5. . 


553 


20.1 


+67 


176 


88 


190 


99 


46 


10 


29 


1945-46. . 


621 


22.7 


—52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


a50 


12 


47 


1946-47. . 


712 


25.3 


+79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


a50 


15 


41 


1947^8. . 


586 


19.6 


+ 181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


d59 


20 


32 


1948-49. . 


646 


20.5 


+ 148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


c59 


26 


21 


1949-50. . 


692 


20.3 


+ 264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


d43 


26 


33 


1950-51. . 


831 


22.7 


+250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


f58 


9 


36 


1951-52. . 


1,068 


25.8 


+478 


447 


10 


399 


206 


f95 


14 


47 


1952-53. . 


1,148 


25.1 


+437 


509 


2 


463 


163 


glOO 


4 


22 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1943^4. . 


517 


28.7 


— 55 


196 


6 


241 


74 


58 


27 


10 


1944-45. . 


525 


29.0 


+ 16 


178 


71 


210 


66 


46 


24 


15 


1945-46. . 


779 


37.0 


+286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


116 


22 


1946^7. . 


763 


33.4 


+ 193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


c57 


53 


28 


1947-48. . 


675 


26.7 


+ 239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


b38 


43 


15 


1948^9. . 


605 


22.4 


+ 168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


b57 


22 


14 


1949-50. . 


722 


24.6 


+242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


a52 


42 


10 


1950-51. . 


912 


27.4 


+394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


a53 


19 


13 


1951-52. . 


943 


26.0 


+289 


545 


1 


312 


79 


fl04 


29 


29 


1952-53. . 


907 


23.7 


+200 


513 


3 


295 


91 


el04 


11 


12 



COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1943-44. . 


120 


20.3 


—6 


81 


6 


18 


15 


9 




5 


1944-45. . 


132 


22.3 


+ 14 


84 


17 


16 


15 


21 




3 


1945-46. . 


108 


18.2 


—10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


1 


4 


1946-47. . 


104 


17.0 


+ 18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


5 


1 


1947^48. . 


71 


11.7 


—5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


3 


6 


1948-49. . 


97 


15.1 


+35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


a9 


3 


3 


1949-50. . 


71 


10.9 


+ 11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


3 


7 


1950-51. . 


76 


11.5 


+8 


39 


*5 


14 


18 


6 


2 


2 


1951-52. . 


94 


13.6 


+32 


52 


3 


18 


21 


11 


4 


6 


1952-53. . 


84 


11.5 


+27 


53 




20 


10 


all 


1 


4 



COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1943-44. . 


79 


37.4 


+ 15 


52 


5 


19 


3 


4 


1 




1944-45. . 


90 


43.1 


+7 


49 


9 


28 


4 


11 






1945-46. . 


96 


37.0 


+43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


al2 


ii 




1946^7. . 


104 


35.3 


+35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


10 




1947-48. . 


110 


32.3 


+46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


10 




1948-49. . 


98 


26.0 


+36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


4 




1949-50. . 


102 


24.2 


+44 


68 


1 


24 


9 


6 


5 




1950-51. . 


153 


29.8 


+ 93 


93 




42 


18 


10 


10 




1951-52. . 


139 


24.5 


+53 


91 




37 


11 


11 


4 


2 


1952-53 . . 


111 


18.5 


+33 


72 


i 


30 


7 


all 


1 


1 



* Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

t Withdrawals during year who returned during the same year excluded from total number and per 
cent. 

Transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent as follows: a-1; b-2; c-3; 
d-4;e-5; f-6; g-11. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 72 

Number and Per Cent of White Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1952-53 



County 



New to 
County 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
Cent 



2 -a 



-a o 



Number New to County Who Were 



Inex- 
peri- 
enced 



Substi- 
tutes 



Experienced 



But New to 
State* 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



is*: 





o o a o 



SCO 



><28j5 



Total State 

Baltimore City 
Elementary and 
Occupational . . . 

Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's... 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1,419 



294 

1,148 

35 
139 
241 
15 
10 

29 
31 
7 
10 
37 



234 
5 
9 
14 
10 

43 
17 
15 



22.5 



17.3 

25.0 

12.5 
38.9 
28.3 
48.4 
17.5 

20.0 
26.7 
10.8 
13.7 
21.4 

15.3 
25.4 
30.4 
15.0 
33.2 

35.6 
11.6 
19.1 
28.0 
20.0 

15.2 
16.0 
25.0 



+520 



+83 

+437 

+ 15 
+49 
+99 
+3 
+5 

+6 
+13 
+9 
+2 
+ 17 

+1 
+15 
+8 
+3 
+ 70 

+98 


+4 
+ 1 
+ 1 

+ 12 
-1 
+7 



663 



154 

509 

13 
57 
125 
7 
3 

13 
10 
1 
1 
16 



14G 

10 

136 

4 
15 
14 



397 



327 

3 
41 
50 
4 
1 

5 
8 
2 
1 
3 



211 



48 

163 

10 
18 
27 
3 
4 



112 

12 

100 

5 
8 
28 
1 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and per- 
centage for total State. 

a Includes 11 from i3altimore City; 9 in Baltimore County, 1 each in Frederick and Prince George's counties. 



124 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 73 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers New 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1952-53 



County 


New to 
County 


• Change in Number of Teaching 
Positions— October to October 




Number N 


ew to County Who Were 




Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Inex- 
peri- 
enced 


Substi- 
tutes 


But > 

St£ 

From 
Mary- 
land 


few to 
ite* 

From 
Other 
States 


Former County 
Teachers But Not H 
Teaching in Coun- ,g 
ties in 1951-52 » 


ienced 

++ 

>> 

» c S 
S 3 

u a 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County t 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
Who Returned 
During Year 


Total State 


1,018 


19.8 


+231 


569 


3 


62 


267 


117 


117 


12 


14 


Baltimore City 
























Junior High 


69 


10.9 


+3 


34 




4 


9 


16 


6 


1 


2 




48 


8.5 


+23 


17 




3 


13 


9 


6 






Vocational 


12 


9. 5 


+ 5 


5 






5 


1 


1 






Total Counties 


907 


23.7 


+200 


513 


3 


55 


240 


91 


104 


11 


12 


Allegany 


51 


17.1 


+8 


23 




1 


16 


4 






1 


Anne Arundel 


71 


26.7 


+ 14 


15 


i 


4 


34 


9 


8 


4 




Baltimore 


176 


27.2 


+41 


111 


1 


10 


25 




22 


2 


i 




17 


60.7 


+ 1 


7 




1 


6 


3 




1 






21 


33.9 


+2 


11 






1 


4 


'5 




i 


Carroll 


48 


30.6 


+4 


28 


1 


1 


5 


10 


3 


2 




Cecil 


44 


38.3 


+3 


22 




5 


13 


1 


3 




i 


Charles 


10 


15.9 


+2 


4 




2 


2 


2 






1 


Dorchester 


10 


14.1 


+ 1 


5 




1 


1 


2 


i 






Frederick 


45 


24.7 


+4 


24 




2 


8 


7 


4 


i 




Garrett 


26 


32.5 


-4 


19 






2 


2 


3 






Harford 


41 


28.5 


+ 10 


26 




'2 


9 


1 


3 






Howard 


32 


39.0 


+12 


19 




1 


7 




5 






Kent 


10 


24.4 


+2 


3 






6 




1 








127 


25.1 


+55 


56 




'8 


36 


10 


17 




6 


Prince George's 


130 


25.5 


+31 


70 




3 


39 


9 


9 


1 


1 




13 


28.3 





6 






3 


2 


2 






St. Mary's 


19 


47.5 


+6 


13 




*2 


2 




2 








14 


29.8 


+ 1 


6 




3 


2 


'i 


2 






Talbot 


14 


28.6 


+ 1 


7 




1 


3 


1 


2 






Washington 


50 


18.3 


+9 


23 




7 


8 


9 


3 






Wicomico 


17 


27.9 





6 




1 


4 


4 


2 






Worcester 


20 


36.4 


-3 


9 






8 


3 









* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and percentage for total 
State. 

a Includes 5 from Baltimore City; 3 in Baltimore County and 1 each in Harford and Queen Anne's counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



TABLE 74 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1952-53 



OTTMTV 
VUU1M1I 


New to 
County 


Change in Number of Teaching 
Positions— October to October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Inex- 
peri- 
enced 


Substi- 
tutes 


But IS 
Sts 

From 
land 


ew to 
te* 

From 
Other 
States 


Former County 
Teachers But Not H 
Teaching in Coun- .g 
ties in 1951-52 » 


ienced 

t >> 

III 


From Other 
Type School 
in Same 
County t 


Withdrawals 
During Year 
W r ho Returned 
During Year 


Total State 


147 


8. 6 


+66 


99 




6 


18 


24 


12 


2 


20 


Baltimore City 
























Elementary and 
























Occupational 


65 


6. 5 


+39 


46 




2 


2 


14 


1 


1 


16 


Total Counties 


84 


11.5 


+27 


53 




4 


16 


10 


11 


1 


4 


Allegany 





0.0 





















Anne Arundel 


11 


12.6 


+3 


'6 






i 


4 








Baltimore 


4 


5.3 


+4 


4 
















Calvert 


12 


40.0 


+1 


7 






3 


i 


i 








2 


13.3 


-1 


2 














i 


Carroll 


3 


33.3 





2 




1 












Cecil 


2 


22.2 





2 
















Charles 


4 


7.3 


+5 


3 






i 










Dorchester 


3 


9.4 


+1 


1 






l 




i 




i 


Frederick 


4 


23.5 





2 




i 






l 






Garrett 
























Harford 


'6 


0.0 


'6 


















Howard 





0.0 


-l 


















Kent 


i 


6.3 















i 






Montgomery 


6 


11.1 


+6 


*3 




i 


'i 




i 




'i 


Prince George's 


17 


15.0 


+2 


8 




l 


5 


1 


2 








4 


26.7 


-1 


3 










1 






St. Mary's 


3 


13.0 


+1 


1 








i 


1 








5 


17.9 


+2 


5 
















Talbot 


1 


3.8 


+ 1 








i 










Washington 


1 


16.7 











i 










Wicomico 


7 


17.5 


+3 


*4 








2 


i 








4 


14.8 


+ 1 








2 


1 


l 




i 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

X Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group and total State, 
but transfers from Baltimore City arc included in counties as a group but not in total State. 
a Includes one transfer from Baltimore City In Calvert County. 



126 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 75 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers 
New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 

1952-53 



County 



New to 
County 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
Cent 



•3 u. 

a> -2 



O 



Number New to County Who Were 



Inex- 
peri- 
enced 



Substi- 
tutes 



Experienced 



But New to 
State* 



From 
Mary- 
land 



From 
Other 
States 



Ills 

o o <o <2 



160 


14.6 


+73 


99 


45 


15.8 


+27 


25 


2 


1.5 


+4 




3 


3.9 


+9 


2 


111 


18.5 


+33 


72 





0.0 


-1 




13 


21.0 


+1 


'7 


13 


19.1 


+9 


6 


6 


27.3 


+2 


3 


6 


33.3 


+2 


5 


1 


12.5 










0.0 







10 


25.6 


+4 


*7 


3 


13.6 


+1 


1 


8 


57.1 





6 


*5 


20.' 8 


-i 


*4 


3 


15.8 


+2 


2 


5 


31.3 





2 


5 


11.4 


-1 


3 


18 


20.2 


+8 


10 





0.0 







3 


15.8 


+3 




14 


50.0 


+4 


8 


3 


15.0 


+ 1 


3 





0.0 










0.0 







5 


20.0 


-1 


*5 



mi 



S <v 3 » 



Total State 

Baltimore City- 
Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



35 



24 



* Includes transfers from private schools. 

t Excluded from all totals in columns one and two. 

t Transfers from one county to another are excluded from counties as a group, but transfers from Baltimore City are 
included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total and percentage for total State. 
a Includes one transfer from iJaltimore City in Carroll County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



TABLE 76 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* Elementary Schools: 
Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County 


Schools for White Pupils 


Schools fob Colored Pupils 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total Counties 


33 


0.7 


721 


0.5 


26 


3 


5 


729 


3.1 


Allegany 










1 


20 





35 


20.7 


Anne Arundel 




















Baltimore 






























'i 


3 


6 


33 


3.1 










































Cecil 


2 


l.*7 


50* 


l!3 












Charles 




















Dorchester 


ii 


i5ii 


200 


9^8 


*6 


18 


7 


143 




Frederick 


l 


0.6 


17 


0.3 


3 


15 


8 


78 


12 A 


Garrett 


n 


11.0 


262 


9.4 














l 


0.5 


23 


0.4 
































Kent 










'2 


12 


5 


oi 


12 !i 






















Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 




















'2 


4/T 


65 


5.1 


6 


35 


3 


267 


4i!i 


St. Mary's 


1 


2.0 


23 


1.5 


2 


8 


7 


54 


7.7 




2 


4.0 


37 


2.7 












Talbot 


1 


2.0 


21 


1.4 


3 


12 


6 


68 


9.0 




1 


0.3 


23 


0.3 






















*2 


5 


6 


50 


3.9 























• Schools having a one-teacher organization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



128 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 77 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools*: 

1944-1953 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year 
Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1944 


2,979 


118 


4.0 


602 


121 


20.2 


1945 


3,050 


106 


3.5 


611 


112 


18.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 


1951 


3,696 


54 


1.5 


663 


49 


7.4 


1952 


4, 164 


40 


1.0 


696 


35 


5.0 


1953 


4,670 


33 


0.7 


731 


26 


3.5 



* Schools having a one-teacher oganization, i.e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight. 



TABLE 78 

Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties: 1944-1953 



Year 
Ending June 30 


White 


Elementary- 


High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1944 


108 


4.0 


488 


27.3 


1945 


104 


3.7 


465 


25.8 


1946 


107 


3.9 


629 


29.4 


1947 


125 


4.5 


787 


33.8 


1948 


161 


5.4 


931 


36.7 


1949 


175 


5.5 


1,025 


38.3 


1950 


243 


7.1 


1,203 


41.1 


1951 


295 


8.0 


1,454 


44.0 


1952 


380 


9.1 


1,654 


45.9 


1953 


460 


9.9 


1,822 


47.5 



Colored 



Elementary 



Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


44 


7.5 


72 


34.8 


43 


7.1 


78 


36.8 


45 


7.5 


88 


33.7 


52 


8.6 


103 


34.4 


62 


10.1 


126 


37.2 


68 


10.5 


140 


37.3 


70 


10.6 


154 


36.6 


73 


11.0 


205 


40.0 


77 


11.1 


212 


38.1 


83 


11.4 


239 


39.7 



High 



See TABLE X. 



Maryland State Department of Education 129 



TABLE 79— Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City 
Number of Teachers and Principals : Year Ending June 30, 1953 







>> 
































Prince George's 


00 














Number 
of 

Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


All Schools 


Baltimore Ci 


Allegany 


Anne Arund* 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


O 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomerj 


Queen Anne 


St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


a 

S 
tc 
c 

"3 

c3 


Wicomico 


| Worcester 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



^.11 Schools.. . 


a576 


78 


32 


32 


49 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


23 


27 


30 


21 


8 


8 


58 


49 


12 


11 


10 


9 


37 


15 


10 


1.0- 1.4... 


45 




*°3 


1 






1 


3 


4 




11 


1 


11 


1 










2 


1 


2 


1 


2 






1.5- 2.4. .. 


59; 




1 






'i 


1 




5 




3 


4 


9 


4 


1 


4 


1 


f 3 


3 


b 


3 


1 


6 


'i 


'3* 


2.5- 3.4. . . 


35 




2 


3 


'2 


1 


1 








4 


2 


2 


1 






3 


1 


2 


1 




2 


4 


4 




3.5- 4.4. . . 


41 


"i 


3 


3 


2 


1 






1 




1 


8 


3 






i 


2 


1 


2 








7 


2 


*3 


4.5- 5.4... 


23 


1 






2 






i 


1 


i 




2 


1 


'3 




1 


2 


2 


2 


1 




2 


1 






5.5- 6.4. . . 


35 


2 


4 


3 


1 


'2 


'2 


1 


1 


1 


'i 






1 


i 




3 


5 






'2 


2 


1 


i 


i 


6.5- 7.4... 


27 


1 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 


1 


1 




2 




1 


1 




5 


2 




'l 






2 


2 




7.5- 8.4. . . 


26 


1 


4 


2 


3 






4 




1 


i 


1 


'i 






i 


2 


1 




1 






2 


1 




8.5- 9.4. . . 


18 




2 




2 




i 


1 


'i 






1 




'i 


i 




3 








i 




2 




'2 


9.5-10.4. . . 


17 


2 


2 


*2 


2 


'i 


1 


1 










i 


1 






2 








1 




1 






10.5-11.4. . . 


20 


3 




3 


1 






1 


1 


1 




1 






'2 




1 


2 


1 




1 






i 




11.5-12.4. . . 


14 


3 












1 






i 


1 


i 


'3 






1 


2 












1 




12.5-13.4. . . 


27 


3 


2 


2 


5 




1 


1 






1 


1 




1 


'i 






5 










3 




'i 


13.5-14.4. . . 


18 


2 


1 


2 


3 














1 




1 




i 


3 


3 










1 






14.5-15.4. . . 


15 


2 


2 


1 


1 






1 


2 






1 




1 






1 


2 












i 




15.5-16.4. . . 


21 


2 


2 


4 


1 








2 
















3 


5 




1 






1 






16.5-17.4. . . 


7 


2 




















1 


1 








1 


1 












i 




17.5-18.4. . . 


13 


3 




2 


1 
























6 


1 
















18.5-19.4. . . 


18 


5 






2 
























6 


3 








1 


1 






19.5-20.4. . . 


16 


7 






2 


















1 






5 












1 






20.5 and over 


81 


38 


'i 


3 


16 






1 




1 








1 


'i 




8 


9 










2 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools.. . 


a234 


52 


2 


21 


12 


8 


4 


2 


3 


12 


11 


8 




3 


9 


6 


8 


21 


8 


7 


9 


10 


1 


9 


8 


1.0- 1.4. . . 


30 




1 






1 










7 


3 






tt3 
4 


*3 






5 


2 




»°3 




2 




1.5- 2.4. .. 


60 






'9 


*6 


2 






1 


4 


1 


4 




'i 


1 


2 


'8 


1 


3 


'5 


3 




1 


*4 


2.5- 3.4. . . 


34 


'4 




6 


1 


1 


'2 




1 


4 


1 








1 


1 


1 


5 


1 




1 






3 


1 


3.5- 4.4. . . 


16 


2 


'i 






2 




i 


1 


1 














1 








2 


'2 




2 


1 


4.5- 5.4. . . 


10 


1 




'i 






'2 


1 






1 








1 






1 








1 






1 


5.5- 6.4. . . 


11 






3 




'i 








'2 








1 






'i 


1 




1 






'i 






6.5- 7.4. . . 


5 


i 




















1 












1 






i 


"i 








7.5- 8.4. . . 


7 


1 






2 






















1 




1 


i 












1 


8.5- 9.4. . . 


2 


































1 




1 












9.5-10.4. . . 


2 








1 
























1 


















10.5-11.4. . . 


7 


4 








1 
















1 








1 
















11.5-12.4. . . 


6 


4 






1 












1 






























12.5-13.4. . . 


7 


4 




'i 












1 














1 


















13.5-14.4. . . 


3 


1 




1 




























1 
















14.5-15.4. . . 


3 


2 






























1 


















16.5-17.4... 


2 


2 
















































18.5-19.4. . . 


3 


2 












































1 




19.5-20.4. . . 


1 


1 
















































20.5 and over 


25 


23 






1 


























1 

















a Includes a total of fourteen grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior school 
curriculum: white — two in Allegany County and ten in Baltimore County; colored — one in Baltimore County and 
one in : Carroll County. 

* Includes one school having a two-teacher organization. 

Includes two schools having a two-teacher organization. 

t Includes one school having a graded organization. 



130 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 80— Number of Maryland Public Elementary Schools by County and Baltimore City: 
Average Number Belonging : Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Average 
Number 
Belonging 



C 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR WHITE PUPILS 



All Schoola... 


576 


78 


32 


32 


49 


6 


9 


17 


19 


6 


23 


27 


30 


21 


8 


8 


58 


49 


12 


11 


10 


9 


37 


15 


10 


25 or less . . 


33 




3 


1 






1 


3 


1 




9 


1 


7 


l 








1 




1 


2 


1 


1 






26- 50 


37 




1 






' i 






3 




4 


1 


8 


i 


1 


2 


1 




'2 


4 


1 




4 


i 


'2 


51- 106! ; ; 


65 


"i 


2 


i 


i 


l 


2 




5 




5 


5 


7 


3 




2 


3 


'4 


5 


2 


2 


'3 


6 


3 


2 


101- 150. . . 


55 


2 


3 


5 


2 


l 




i 


1 


i 


1 


7 


4 


1 


i 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


7 


3 


2 


151- 200 


43 


2 


4 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 




3 




1 


3 


6 


1 




1 


2 


4 






201- 250 . '.'. 


45 


3 


4 


5 


5 




1 


5 


1 


1 




1 


i 


1 


2 


1 


6 


2 










3 


'2 


i 


251- 300. . . 


38 


1 


6 




4 




2 


1 


1 






1 


l 


1 






5 


2 






'2 




3 


2 


2 


oUl— oou. . . 




i 

X 


^ 


c 
o 


q 
o 






2 


I 


I 




2 




2 


2 




3 


2 
















351- 400. . . 


25 


3 


2 


2 


2 








1 






2 


i 


3 


1 




1 


2 










3 


i 




401- 450. .. 


28 


4 


4 


1 


3 






2 






1 






1 








8 










1 






451- 500. . . 


29 


6 




4 


3 






1 


2 






i 




2 






3 


5 










1 


i 




501- 550. . . 


19 


2 




2 


4 








1 






1 










4 


3 












1 




551- 600. . . 


21 


3 






1 








1 






2 










9 


2 












1 




601- 650. . . 


20 


9 




*2 


1 
























3 


2 










2 






651- 700. . . 


16 


3 






2 
























7 












1 






701- 750. . . 


13 


3 




i 


2 
























3 


3 










1 






751- 800. . . 


7 


2 




1 


1 
























1 


2 
















801- 850. . . 


8 


3 






1 
























1 


2 
















851- 900. . . 


12 


5 




'i 


3 


























1 
















901- 950. . . 


4 


4 
















































951-1000. . . 


11 


8 






2 










































1001-1050. . . 


2 


1 






1 










































1051-1100. . . 


6 


4 






2 










































1101-1150. . . 


4 


4 
















































1151-1200. . . 


1 


1 
















































1201-1250. . . 


1 


































i 
















1251-1300.. . 


1 








i 










































1351-1400... 


2 


2 
















































1401-1450.. . 


1 








i 










































1701 and over 


2 


1 






1 











































ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS FOR COLORED PUPILS 



All Schools. 

25 or less . 

26- 50.. 

51- 100. . 
101- 150. . 
151- 200. . 
201- 250. . 
251- 300. . 
301- 350. . 
351- 400. . 
401- 450. . 
451- 500. . 
501- 550. . 
551- 600. . 
601- 650. . 
651- 700. . 
701- 750. . 
751- 800. . 
801- 850. . 
851- 900. . 
901- 950. . 
951-1000. . 
1001-1050. . 

1201-1250. . 

1301-1350. . 
1351-1400. . 

1451-1500. . 
1501-1550. . 

1601 and over 



234 52 



21 



112 



12 



3 9 



21 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 81 — Number of Maryland Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High Schools 
by County and Baltimore City — Number of Teachers and Principals: 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Number 




>> 

o 




del 


























>> 


rge's 


~<o 








a 






of 

Teachers 


ools 


ore 1 


>> 


Lrun 


ore 




0J 






09 


O 


,ck 










ome 


Geo 


Am 


ry's 






o 
to 


o 
o 


i-. 

3 


AND 

Principals 


All Sch 


Baltim 


Allegai 


Anne A 


Baltim 


Calver 


Carolii 


Carrol] 


Cecil 


Charle 


Dorcht 


Freder 


Garret 


Harfor 


Ho war 


Kent 


Montg 


Prince 


Queen 


St. Ma 


Somen 


Talbot 


Washii 


Wicom 


Worce; 



WHITE JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 





All Schools... 


*174 


27 


10 


8 


15 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


7 


8 


2 


4 


5 


3 


13 


13 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 




1.0- 1.4. . . 


1 








































1 












1.5- 2.4. . . 


1 




















1 
































2.5- 3.4. . . 


1 














































1 






3.5- 4.4... 


6 






1 






1 


2 


1 


1 
































4.5- 5.4. . . 


4 


















1 






















1 


1 


1 








5.5- 6.4. . . 


7 








1 




1 






1 


2 


























2 






6.5- 7.4... 


3 


1 






1 
































1 












7.5- 8.4. . . 


3 












1 










1 


























1 




8.5- 9.4. . . 


7 


1 


1 












2 






1 








2 






















9.5-10.4. . . 


4 




1 




1 




























1 




1 












10.5-11.4. . . 


3 




1 










1 














1 
























11.5-12.4. . . 


2 


'i 


1 
















































12.5-13.4. . . 


5 


l 












1 


1 




1 


1 






























13.5-14.4. . . 


5 


i 


















1 








1 




1 
















1 




14.5-15.4. . . 


3 




























1 








1 






1 










15.5-16.4. . . 


4 












2 
















1 












i 












16.5-17.4. . . 


7 


i 










1 


2 


















1 






1 










1 




17.5-18.4. . . 


3 


i 




1 








1 






































18.5-19.4. . . 


6 






1 


2 






2 






























1 








19.5-20.4. . . 


3 






















1 






















1 




i 




20.5 and over 


96 


20 


6 


6 


9 


1 




1 


3 


2 


1 


4 


2 


4 


1 


1 


11 


13 


1 


1 




1 


7 








COLORED JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 




All Schools.. . 


*42 


8 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 




2.5- 3.4. . . 


2 
















































2 




3.5- 4.4. . . 


1 


































1 


















5.5- 6.4. . . 


2 




1 


































1 














7.5- 8.4. . . 


2 














1 






























1 








9.5-10.4. . . 


2 
















1 










1 


























10.5-11.4. . . 


2 








1 


























1 


















11.5-12.4. . . 


1 








































1 












12.5-13.4. . . 


2 


1 




































1 














13.5-14.4. . . 


1 






















1 






























14.5-15.4. . . 


1 


























1 


























15.5-16.4. . . 


2 






























1 










1 












16.5-17.4. . . 


2 




































1 












1 




17.5-18.4. . . 


2 








1 




1 








































18.5-19.4. . . 


3 


















1 










1 




1 




















19.5-20.4. . . 


2 


















1 
























1 










20.5 and over 


15 


7 




1 


1 


1 










1 












1 


2 












1 





* Excludes a total of fourteen seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior 
school curriculum: white — two in Allegany County and ten in Baltimore County; colored — one in Baltimore County 
and one in Carroll County. 



132 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 82 — Number of Maryland Junior, Junior-Senior, Senior, and Vocational High School 
by County and Baltimore City— Average Number Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Average 




City 




ndel 














u 












•ntgomery 


□rge's 


ne's 








c 






Number 
Belonging 


. School 


Itimore 


egany 


ne Aru 


Itimore 


lvert 


roline 


rroll 


'3 


arles 


rcheste 


iderick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 




nee Ge< 


een An 


Mary'i 


Somerset 


lbot 


i,shingt( 


ooicaoo 


•rcester 




< 


o3 
PQ 


< 




< 




e3 

u 


o 


03 

o 


O 


o 


o 
Q 


u 

to 


o3 



03 


o 

w 


& 






& 


CQ 


03 

H 




5 





WHITE JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools.. . 


174 


27 


10 


8 


15 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


7 


8 


2 


4 


5 


3 


13 


13 


3 


2 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 


25 or less . . 


1 








































1 










26- 50 


1 




















1 






























51- 100. . . 


17 


2 










1 


1 


2 


3 


3 




















1 


1 


1 


2 




101- 150. . . 


9 








3 




» 1 










1 








1 










1 






1 


i 


151- 200. . . 


12 


2 


2 










2 


2 






1 






1 


1 






1 














201- 250 


7 


1 


2 




1 






1 


















i 
















1 


251- 300. . . 


12 












'2 




1 




1 


1 






3 




1 




1 




1 


1 








301- 350. . . 


10 


1 




1 






1 


'3 






1 


















'i 






1 




1 


ooi— tuu . . . 


o 
o 


i 
i 
































2 






1 




1 






401- 450. . . 


9 




i 


i 










2 


1 










1 


1 






i 












'i 


451- 500. . . 


9 


'2 




















1 




1 






i 


'i 




1 






2 






501- 550. . . 


6 




1 














1 


1 


1 




1 








1 
















551- 600. . . 


6 


2 








1 






















2 












1 






601- 650. . . 


4 


1 


1 




























1 










1 








651- 700. . . 


5 








1 








1 
















1 












2 






701- 750. . . 


7 


1 




1 


















1 








1 


3 
















751- 800. . . 


3 






1 
















1 




1 
























801- 850. . . 


2 
































2 


















851- 900. . . 


3 






1 




























1 










1 






901- 950. . . 


5 




i 


1 


2 
















1 


























951-1000. . . 


2 


i 




1 












































1001-1050. . . 


3 






1 




























1 
















1051-1100. . . 


4 








1 






1 


















1 


1 
















1151-1200. . . 


1 














































1 




1201-1250. . . 


1 


1 
















































1251-1300. . . 


1 






















1 




























1301-1350. . . 


1 


































1 
















1351-1400. . . 


3 








1 
























1 












1 






1401-1450. . . 


4 


2 


1 






























1 
















1501-1550. . . 


2 








1 


















1 
























1551-1600. . . 


1 


































1 
















1601-1650. . . 


2 








1 
























1 


















1701 and over 


13 


9 


1 




3 











































COLORED JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools.. . 


42 


8 




1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


51- 100. . . 


2 


































1 




1 






1 




1 


101- 150. . . 


5 




1 










1 






























1 


151- 200. . . 


3 
















1 










1 








1 


1 




1 










201- 250. . . 


4 


1 






1 






















1 


1 




'i 










251- 300... 


4 


























1 


















301- 350. . . 


2 












1 










1 


















1 








1 


351- 400. . . 


7 








1 










2 










1 












1 






401- 450. . . 


2 










1 










1 


























1 




451- 500. . . 


2 


1 






























1 


1 














501- 550. . . 


2 














































801- 850. . . 


2 


1 






1 










































901- 950. . . 


1 


1 
















































1151-1200... 


1 


































1 
















1451-1500. . . 


1 


1 
















































1551-1600... 


1 






1 












































2001 and over 


3 


3 

















































Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 83 

Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools: Number of Principals and Teachers: 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County 


Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Total 
visors 


Eleme 
White 


upervisors r 
School 

Colored 


y Type of 
High 


Other 
visors f 


Pupil 
PcrsonnGl 


Total State 


14,344.0 


241.1 


63.7 


19.1 


58.5 


99.8 


105.6 


Baltimore City .... 


4,510.3 


86.0 


11.0 


6.0 


15.0 


54.0 


53.0 


Total Counties. . . . 


9,833.7 


155.1 


52.7 


13.1 


43.5 


45.8 


52.6 


Allegany 


586.5 


9.5 


3.0 


t 


2.0 


4.5 


3.0 


Anne Arundel. . . 


775.6 


8.0 


3.0 


1.0 


2.0 


2.0 


4.9 




1,655.9 


25.6 


6.5 


1.0 


8.0 


10.1 


9.0 


Calvert 


113.5 


2.0 


1.0 


1.0 






1.0 


Caroline 


153.4 


2.4 


1.0 


0.4 


i'.o 




0.9 


Carroll 


322.4 


5.5 


2.0 


0.2 


2.0 


1.3 


2.0 


Cecil 


252.5 


4.5 


2.0 


t 


2.0 


0.5 


1.0 


Charles 


221.7 


4.0 


1.0 


1.0 


2.0 




2.0 


Dorchester 


198.0 


3.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 




1.0 


Frederick 


383.8 


5.0 


1.5 


0.3 


1.7 


i^5 


1.0 


Garrett 


179.6 


4.0 


2.0 




2.0 




1.0 


Harford 


372.6 


4.5 


2.0 


t" 


2.5 




1.8 


Howard 


199.8 


3.7 


1.2 


0.6 


1.4 


6.5 


1.0 


Kent 


109.5 


2.5 


1.0 


0.5 


1.0 




1.0 


Montgomery 


1,407.1 


22.5 


9.5 


0.5 


4.0 


8.5 


5.5 


Prince George's . 


1,382.7 


21.0 


5.0 


1.0 


3.0 


12.0 


7.0 


Queen Anne's. . . 


122.9 


2.5 


1.0 


0.5 


1.0 




0.5 


St. Mary's 


130.8 


3.2 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


0.2 


1.0 


Somerset 


152.9 


3.0 


1.0 


0.6 


1.4 




1.0 


Talbot 


144.3 


2.5 


1.0 


0.5 


1.0 




1.0 


Washington .... 


570.5 


9.2 


3.0 


t 


1.5 


4.7 


3.0 




230.7 


4.0 


2.0 


1.0 


1.0 




2.0 




167.0 


3.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 




1.0 



* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio-Visual Education, Commercial, Curriculum, Distributive Educa- 
tion, English, Geography, Guidance, Handwriting, Health, History, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion, Instruction, Languages, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Radio and Television, 
Reading, Safety Education, School Lunch, Science, Special Education, Testing, Vocational Education. 

t Less than 0.1 of supervisor's time. 



134 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid: Counties of Maryland and 
Baltimore City: 1923-1953 

60 _______ 



50 




Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 84 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1953 



School Year 



Current Expenses by Source of Funds 



Total 



State 



Federal 



Local 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



TOTAL STATE 



1923 


$12,764,250 


83,058,180 




$46,966 


$9,659, 104 


$789,311 


$4,776,355 


1928 


16, 147,689 


3,207,088 




69, 150 


12,871,451 


2, 131,699 


3,430,589 


1933 


18,293,874 


4,616,690 




80, 139 


13,597,045 


3,142,211 


1,955,727 


1938 


20,467,797 


6,196,636 




209,722 


14,061,439 


3,739,854 


2,335,232 


1943 


23,546,628 


6,960,882 




245,787 


16,339,959 


3,776,207 


834,802 


1944 


26,772,479 


9,350,5.54 




155,604 


17,266,321 


4,119,423 


431.809 


1945 


28,121,601 


8,982, 115 




520,720 


18,618,766 


4,063,754 


817,053 


1946 


31,068,741 


10,803,700 




434, 104 


19,830,937 


4, 192,979 


2,197,635 


1947 


36,621,996 


11,594,496 


1, 


234,736 


23,792,764 


3,878,466 


3,547,469 


1948 


51, 175,927 


21,534,379 


1, 


547,581 


28,093,967 


4,506,683 


10,681,767 


1949 


57,567, 186 


22,993,313 


1, 


235,487 


33,338,386 


4,893, 175 


20,338, 146 


1950 


64,661,563 


24,640,596 


2, 


011,407 


38,009,560 


6,800,278 


27,153,046 


1951 


71,448,847 


27,659,372 


2, 


080, 125 


41,709,350 


6, 133,501 


31,768,013 


1952 


80,931,643 


30,241,963 


2, 


380,208 


48,309,472 


7,751,625 


40,596,878 


1953 


91,844,287 


32,458,006 


2, 


457,252 


56,929,029 


9,850,293 


43,516,284 



BALTIMORE CITY 



1923 


$6,799,794 


$1,052,845 


$13,256 


$5,733,693 


$685,620 


$3,301,086 


1928 


8,360,391 


999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,580,599 


1,897,871 


1933 


9,312,282 


1,568,928 


11, 131 


7,732,223 


1,983, 157 


1,267,230 


1938 


10, 103,224 


1,463,505 


61,200 


8,578,519 


2,335,256 


758.798 


1943 


10,620,120 


1,495,480 


64,355 


9,060,285 


2, 105,427 


17,989 


1944 


11,925,742 


2,265,683 


45,953 


9,614, 106 


2, 192,721 


8,271 


1945 


12,357,985 


1,981,734 


75,627 


10,300,624 


2,210,496 


113.214 


1946 


13,048,637 


2,176,054 


77,328 


10,795,255 


2,349,885 


605,127 


1947 


14,455,866 


2,243,349 


175,615 


12,036,902 


1,958,255 


372,505 


1948 


20,500,455 


4,779,040 


656, 839 


15,064,576 


2,307,374 


431,267 


1949 


22,625,966 


5,016,904 


277,450 


17,331,612 


1,628.980 


823.371 


1950 


25.684,535 


5,422,725 


717,106 


19,544,704 


1,647,487 


4,328,329 


1951 


27, 113, 114 


6,016,080 


668,895 


20,428, 139 


1,622.453 


7, 170.345 


1952 


28,683,507 


6,060,360 


506,334 


22, 116,813 


1,754,563 


10,687. 124 


1953 


33,011,067 


6,404,596 


339.035 


26,267,436 


1,810,740 


6,819.028 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



1923 


$5,964,456 


$2,005,335 


$33,710 


' $3,925,411 


$103,691 


$1,475,269 


1928 


7,787,298 


2,207,335 


51,910 


5.528,053 


551, 100 


1,532,718 


1933 


8,981,592 


3,047,762 


69,008 


5,864,822 


1, 159,054 


688,497 


1938 


10,364,573 


4,733, 131 


148, 522 


5,482,920 


1,404,598 


1,576,434 


1943 


12,926,508 


5,465,402 


181,432 


7,279,674 


1,670.780 


816,813 


1944 


14,846,737 


7,081,871 


109,651 


7,652,215 


1,926,702 


423.538 


1945 


15,763,616 


7,000,381 


445,093 


8,318,142 


1,853,258 


703.839 


1946 


18,020, 104 


8,627,646 


356,776 


9,035,682 


1,843,094 


1,592,508 


1947 


22,166,130 


9,351, 147 


1,059, 121 


11,755,862 


1,920,211 


3,174.964 


1948 


30.675,472 


16,755.339 


890,742 


13.029,391 


2, 199,309 


10.250.500 


1949 


34,941,220 


17,976,409 


958,037 


16,006,774 


3,264,195 


19,514,775 


1950 


38,977,028 


19,217,871 


1,294,301 


18,464,856 


5, 152,791 


22.824.717 


1951 


44,335,733 


21,643,292 


1,411,230 


21.281.211 


4,511.048 


24.597,668 


1952 


52,248, 136 


24. 181,603 


1,873,874 


26. 192,659 


5,997.062 


29,909,754 


1953 


58,833,220 


26,053,410 


2,118,217 


30,661,593 


8,039,553 


36,697,256 



N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



136 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County- 



Total State 
Baltimore City- 
Total Counties 

Charles 

Garrett 

St. Mary '8 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Howard 

Queen Anne^ 
Kent 

Dorchester 
Cecil 

Anne Arundel 

Talbot 

Harford 

VTorcester 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Prince George's 

Montgomery 

Baltimore 



Received 
from 



State, Excluding 
B Equalization Fund 

^Equalization Fund ^ 
25 50 




Federal Aid 

County Levy and 
Other County Funds 

75 100 



m um 

till Till 






1 8 




1 8 






Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 85 

Source of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1953 













Per Cent from Each Source 




Total 






Local Levy 


State 




Local 
Levy 


County 


Current 
Funds 


State 


Federal 


and Other 
Local Sources 


Equal- 
ization 
Fund 


Other 


Total 


Fed- 
eral 


and 
Other 
Local 
Sour- 
ces 


Total State . 


$91,844,286.61 


$32,458,005.57 


$2,457,252.33 


$56,929,028.71 


14.2 


21.1 


35.3 


2.7 


62.0 


Balto. City. 


t33,011,067.13 


f6, 404, 595.73 


339,035.63 


t26,267,435.77 




19.4 


19.4 


1.0 


79.6 


Tot. Counties 


158,833,219.48 


J26, 053, 409.84 


2,118,216.70 


30, 661,592.94 


22.2 


22.1 


44.3 


3.6 


52.1 


Allegany . . . 
An. Arundel 
Baltimore . . 

Calvert 

Caroline .... 


3,431,726.65 
4,065,489.62 
9,759,543.22 
636,562.05 
831,512.02 


1,744,699.50 
2,071,737.93 
1,998,063.93 
449,529.32 
538,429.43 


133,713.85 
241,355.03 
189.336.39 
21,867.74 
13,643.68 


1.553,313.30 
1,752,396.66 
7,572. 142.90 
165, 164.99 
279,438.91 


33.7 
31.3 
2.7 
52.0 
46.5 


17.1 
19.7 
17.8 
18.6 
18.3 


50.8 
51.0 
20.5 
70.6 
64.8 


3.9 
5.9 
1.9 
3.4 
1.6 


45.3 
43.1 
77.6 
26.0 
33.6 


Carroll 

Cecil 


1,640,166.82 
1,345,877.71 
1,153,570.77 
1,094,698.56 
2,061,918.36 


869,020.38 
662,922.90 
825, 197.57 
620,714.68 
972,049.87 


33,849.71 
116,464.40 
134, 139.47 
26,236.42 
87,806.26 


737,296.73 
566,490.41 
194,233.73 
447,747.46 
1,002,062.23 


33.2 
30.1 


19.8 
19.1 


53.0 
49.2 


2.1 
8.7 


44.9 
42.1 


Charles 

Dorchester. . 
Frederick . . . 


52.3 
38.4 
27.8 


19.3 
18.3 
19.3 


71.6 
56.7 
47.1 


11.6 
2.4 
4.3 


16.8 
40.9 
48.6 


Garrett 

Harford 

Howard .... 


1,031,500.11 
2, 112,949.01 
1,042,753.79 
636,683.01 
8,929,583.30 


788,274.64 
864,861.46 
645,671.84 
374,599.29 
1,930,255.93 


25,902.65 
329,882.10 

19,009.40 
8,532.21 
285,282.36 


217,322.82 
918,205.45 
378,072.55 
253,551.51 
6,714,045.01 


58.9 
22.4 
43.1 
40.9 


17.5 
18.5 
18.8 
18.0 
14.9 


76.4 
40.9 
61.9 
58.9 
21.6 


2.5 
15.6 
1.8 
1.3 


21.1 

43.5 
36.3 
39.8 
75.2 


Montgomery 


6.7 


3.2 


Pr. George's 
Qu. Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . 
Somerset . . . 
Talbot 


7,765,831.88 
678,802.08 
730,909.79 
746, 194.07 
752,711.53 


3,254,750.43 
404,091.51 
466, 137.82 
552,228.79 
412,947.60 


190,871.38 
15,781.88 

109.901.74 
10,212.63 
14,601.86 


4,320,210.07 
258,928.69 
154,870.23 
183,752.65 
325, 162.07 


23.8 
41.3 
44.8 
53.2 
35.6 


18.1 
18.2 
19.0 
20.8 
19.3 


41.9 
59.5 
63.8 
74.0 
54.9 


2.5 
2.3 
15.0 
1.4 
1.9 


55.6 
38.2 
21.2 
24.6 
43.2 


Washington . 
Wicomico . . 
Worcester. . 


3,160,086.63 
1,321,929.62 
906,432.88 


1,528,550.80 
583,647.01 
499,241.21 


70,882.60 
25,936.60 
13,006.34 


1,560,653.23 
712,346.01 
394, 185.33 


30.2 
24.8 
36.4 


18.2 
19.3 
18.7 


48.4 
44.1 
55.1 


2.2 
2.0 
1.4 


49.4 
53.9 
43.5 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1952 and excludes those for the cur- 
rent year received after June 30, 1953. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: State, $1,855,775.00; local, $262,- 
370.00; total $2,118,145.00. 

t Includes $2,963,941.00 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $31,845.00 for the related expense fund not 
distributed to the counties in these columns. 



138 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Per Cent Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses: 
Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




Maryland State Department of Education 139 
TABLE 86 

Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education: 

Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Current Expenses 




County 


General 
Control 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Teachers 


Books, Ma- 
terials and 

Other Costs 
of Instruc- 
tion 


Opera- 
tion 


Mainte- 
nance 


Auxiliary 
Agen- 
cies 


Fixed 
Charges and 
Payments to 
Adjoining 
Counties 


Capital 
Outlay* 



including cost of transportation 



Tnta.1 Sta+p 


2.8 


1 .7 


63 .2 


5.3 


7.8 


4.6 


8.2 


+fi 4 
|D . * 


32 13 




3.2 


1 .8 


64 .3 


6 1 


8.7 


5.3 


3.9 


TO . 1 


17 12 


Total Counties 


2.5 


1.6 


62.7 


4.9 


7.2 


4.2 


10.6 


f6.3 


38.39 


All 


2 .8 


1.6 


64 .6 


5 . 1 


7 .3 


4.3 


13 .2 


1 1 


24 .23 


Anne *\ru ndd . . . . 


3 1 


1 2 


68 .6 


4 5 


7 " g 


3 6 


9 7 


1 4 


41 89 




2.*5 


l!7 


67^9 


7^2 


6^5 


5^8 


7!6 


0."8 


46i41 


Calvert 


3.9 


1.7 


57.1 


3.3 


6.8 


3.1 


22.6 


1.5 


34.79 


Caroline 


2.8 


1.8 


64.3 


3.1 


6.1 


4.0 


16.7 


1.2 


9.50 


Carroll 


2.4 


2.0 


69.0 


3.9 


6.3 


1.9 


12.8 


1.7 


11.44 


Cecil 


2.2 


2.0 


64.7 


4.9 


8.2 


4.0 


12.6 


1.4 


31.46 


Charles 


3.0 


1.9 


62.4 


5.1 


9.1 


2.4 


14.7 


1.4 


39.78 


Dorchester 


2.7 


1.6 


63.7 


2.8 


6.7 


4.4 


15.8 


2.3 


55.52 


Frederick 


2.2 


1.5 


68.3 


3.5 


7.2 


2.4 


13.6 


1.3 


24.09 


Garrett 


3.2 


2.1 


57.3 


3.3 


5.1 


3.0 


23.2 


2.8 


39.08 


Harford 


2.8 


1.1 


63.9 


5.1 


8.1 


3.9 


14.3 


0.8 


45.51 


Howard 


3.0 


1.6 


64.3 


4.0 


6.2 


3.0 


15.5 


2.4 


21.74 


Kent 


4.1 


2.4 


63.3 


3.7 


6.7 


3.2 


15.5 


1.1 


38.05 




2.4 


1.7 


66.0 


5.5 


9.2 


4.8 


9.1 


1.3 


45.25 


Prince George's. . . 


2.3 


1.6 


66.7 


5.4 


9.5 


5.8 


7.7 


1.0 


39.39 


Queen Anne's .... 


2.5 


2.3 


61.9 


3.8 


6.8 


2.4 


19.2 


1.1 


13.91 


St. Mary's 


3.4 


2.5 


55 . 1 


4.8 


7.9 


4.8 


20.4 


1.1 


40.08 


Somerset 


3.1 


2.2 


65.8 


3.1 


5.0 


5.2 


15.3 


0.3 


36.82 


Talbot 


2.7 


1.9 


66.1 


3.0 


5.4 


5.6 


14.1 


1.2 


53.89 




3.4 


1.7 


69.9 


3.9 


6.8 


2.4 


10.8 


1.1 


16.65 




3.1 


1.7 


63.8 


5.0 


5.5 


3.7 


14.6 


2.6 


45.03 


Worcester 


3.2 


1.7 


61.3 


4.6 


5.6 


5.1 


16.7 


1.8 


51.42 


EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 


Total State 


2.9 


1.7 


66.8 


5.6 


8.2 


4.8 


3.2 


f6.8 


33.31 


Baltimore City 


3.2 


1.8 


64.5 


6.1 


8.7 


5.3 


3.7 


t6.7 


17.15 


Total Counties 


2.8 


1.7 


68.1 


5.3 


7.9 


4.5 


2.9 


f6.8 


40.38 


Allegany 


3.0 


1.7 


69.8 


5.5 


7.9 


4.6 


6.3 


1.2 


25.67 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


3.4 


1.3 


74.6 


4.9 


8.6 


4.0 


1.7 


1.5 


43.95 




2.6 


1.9 


72.5 


7.7 


7.0 


6.2 


1.3 


0.8 


48.06 


Calvert 


4.9 


2.1 


71.9 


4.2 


8.6 


4.0 


2.5 


1.8 


40.18 


Caroline 


3.3 


2.1 


74.9 


3.6 


7.1 


4.7 


2.9 


1.4 


10.90 


Carroll 


2.7 


2.2 


76.6 


4.4 


7.1 


2.1 


3.0 


1.9 


12.55 


Cecil 


2.4 


2.2 


72.5 


5.5 


9.2 


4.5 


2.1 


1.6 


33.97 




3.5 


2.1 


72.0 


5.8 


10.5 


2.7 


1.7 


1.7 


43.24 


Dorchester 


3.1 


1.8 


73.9 


3.2 


7.7 


5.1 


2.5 


2.7 


59.13 


Frederick 


2.4 


1.7 


77.1 


4.0 


8.1 


2.7 


2.5 


1.5 


26.38 


Garrett 


4.1 


2.7 


72.2 


4.2 


6.5 


3.7 


3.1 


3.5 


44.70 


Harford 


3.2 


1.2 


71.9 


5.8 


9.1 


4.4 


3.5 


0.9 


48.45 




3.4 


1.8 


74.3 


4.7 


7.1 


3.4 


2.4 


2.9 


24.29 


Kent 


4.8 


2.7 


73.7 


4.4 


7.8 


3.7 


1.6 


1.3 


41.69 


Montgomery 


2.5 


1.8 


69.0 


5.8 


9.6 


5.0 


4.9 


1.4 


46.37 


Prince George's. . . 


2.5 


1.7 


70.3 


5.7 


10.0 


6.0 


2.7 


1.1 


40.65 


Queen Anne's .... 


3.1 


2.7 


74.4 


4.6 


8.2 


2.8 


2.9 


1.3 


16.26 


St. Mary's 


4.2 


3.1 


67.8 


5.9 


9.7 


5.9 


2.0 


1 .4 


45.15 




3.6 


2.5 


76.5 


3.6 


5.8 


6.0 


1.6 


0.4 


40.38 


Talbot 


3.0 


2.2 


75.4 


3.5 


6.1 


6.4 


2.0 


1.4 


57.13 




3.6 


1.8 


74.7 


4.2 


7.2 


2.6 


4.7 


1.2 


17.57 


Wicomico 


3.5 


1.9 


72.7 


5.7 


6.2 


4.2 


2.8 


3.0 


48.25 


Worcester 


3.8 


2.0 


72.4 


5.5 


6.5 


6.1 


1.6 


2.1 


55.56 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement for county teachers 
not distributed to the counties in this column. 



140 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 87 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: General Control: State of Maryland: 

1945, 1950, 1952, 1953 



County 


1945 


1950 


1952 


1953 


State Average 


S2.67 


$5.93 


$6.60 


$6.48 


Baltimore City 


3.32 


7.89 


8.59 


8.23 


Total Counties 


2.27 


4.94 


5.61 


5.63 


Allegany 


1.92 


5.37 


6.49 


6.37 


Anne Arundel 


2.53 


4.32 


5.33 


5.83 


Baltimore 


1.41 


3.90 


4.87 


5.03 


Calvert 


3.88 


7.48 


7.71 


8.35 


Caroline 


3.88 


5.46 


5.62 


6.34 


Carroll 


2.35 


5.16 


5.37 


4.77 


Cecil 


2.46 


4.10 


4.20 


4.40 


Charles 


2.45 


4.05 


6.00 


6.37 




2.84 


5.04 


5.88 


5.87 




1.94 


3.47 


4.02 


4.10 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1945 


1950 


1952 


1953 


$3.68 


$5.26 


$6.28 


$7.69 


2.02 


4.86 


6.21 


5.66 


2.87 


5.70 


6.64 


6.61 


4.07 


8.44 


8.85 


9.83 


2.80 


5.39 


6.03 


5.58 


1.41 


4.65 


4.43 


4.76 


4.38 


5.71 


5.68 


5.81 


4.53 


6.47 


6.86 


7.20 


3.03 


5.29 


5.44 


6.05 


3.64 


4.67 


5.32 


5.58 


1.85 


6.44 


8.87 


7.17 


3.10 


4.87 


5.65 


6.00 


2.31 


5.23 


5.43 


6.76 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 



TABLE 88 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses: Counties of Maryland: 

1923—1953 







All Schools 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Year 
























Totalf 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 


$43 


00 


$46.22 


$17.07 


$34.84 


$39.84 


$17.08 


$90.79 


$91.12 


$77.38 


1928 


52 


62 


55.85 


24.25 


42.91 


47.81 


22.97 


93.51 


95.82 


52.13 


1933 


51 


89 


54.37 


25.95 


42.51 


46.82 


24.12 


79.32 


82.35 


44.34 


1938 


61 


12 


63.20 


35.15 


50.70 


53.41 


30.10 


87.59 


90.87 


58.54 


1943 


71 


16 


72.48 


56.54 


60.39 


60.70 


48.34 


100.46 


102.57 


84.23 


1944° 


81 


77 


82.62 


66.04 


69.04 


71.16 


58.43 


116.06 


118.20 


100.45 


1945° 


86 


64 


86.62 


68.30 


72.37 


74.83 


60.23 


120.87 


123.04 


105.18 


1946} 


98 


28 


98.27 


76.97 


80.29 


83.15 


67.46 


124.73 


127.02 


107.44 


1947 


114 


54 


114.15 


91.43 


92.83 


95.84 


76.69 


145.20 


147.66 


134.92 


1948 


157 


30 


153.19 


122.59 


124.19 


128.27 


105.62 


194.71 


198.28 


169.78 


1949 


172 


47 


163.29 


133.69 


133.08 


136.89 


115.20 


207.84 


211.59 


182.48 


1950 


176 


92 


166.09 


140.53 


137.60 


140.91 


121.18 


208.07 


211.11 


187.57 


1951 


186 


34 


170.05 


156.26 


141.80 


143.51 


132.52 


214.60 


215.81 


206.56 


1952 


206 


80 


193.05 


178.44 


162.26 


164.27 


150.97 


240.20 


241.32 


232.73 


1953 


216 


17 


201.34 


190.57 


172.94 


174.35 


164.34 


246.25 


247.36 


239.07 



t General control, fixed charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are ex- 
cluded elsewhere in this table. 

t Prior to 1946, pupils in grade 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 

° Includes States and county bonus. 

For basic data for 1953, see TABLES VI, XVIII, XIX, XX, XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



141 



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142 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 90 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1953 







Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




salaries ot 














Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 






vision t 


and 






nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








Teachers 








Total State 


$184.61 


$3.38 


$130.38 


$10.52 


$17.35 


$11.13 


$11.85 


$88.98 


Baltimore City 


215.56 


4.61 


152.90 


16.09 


25.36 


15.15 


1.45 


29.35 




174.35 


2.98 


122.92 


8.67 


14.70 


9.79 


15.29 


108.73 




186.90 


3.38 


129.84 


8.23 


15.14 


11.07 


19.24 


21.68 


Anne Arundel 


149.39 


1.50 


109.48 


6.40 


13.16 


6.49 


12.36 


115.01 


Baltimore 


171.71 


2.41 


121.76 


12.17 


12.53 


13.09 


9.75 


128.97 


Calvert 


209.87 


6.28 


123 . 16 


7.36 


17.10 


9.18 


46.79 


225.87 


Caroline 


181.91 


3.65 


123.90 


3.96 


11.71 


7.41 


31.28 


15.04 


Carroll 


154.26 


2.65 


113.33 


5.33 


10.68 


2.56 


19.71 


17.84 


Cecil 


153.46 


2.78 


105.16 


5.95 


13.35 


5.98 


20.24 


100.95 


Charles 


191.03 


3.06 


121.04 


10.61 


21.45 


6.65 


28.22 


104.58 




190.04 


2.83 


133.24 


4.52 


14.15 


7.44 


27.86 


12.15 


Frederick 


156.57 


2.61 


110.50 


4.84 


13.72 


4.35 


20.55 


63.37 


Garrett 


196.26 


4.09 


126.38 


5.01 


11.47 


5.71 


43.60 


0.61 


Harford 


162.94 


1.66 


109.81 


7.23 


13.78 


8.71 


21.75 


29.41 




169.43 


2.41 


119.40 


5.61 


11.71 


6.12 


24.18 


5.12 


Kent 


194.23 


5.22 


132.63 


6.46 


14.97 


6.64 


28.31 


131.90 


Montgomery. . . . 


203.63 


4.21 


145.47 


12.31 


20.04 


12.68 


8.92 


201.57 


Prince George's . . 


168.15 


2.98 


120.10 


8.26 


16.46 


12.43 


7.92 


164 . 16 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


189.40 


5.11 


122.84 


7.78 


13.36 


5.18 


35.13 


14.88 


St. Mary's 


170.01 


3.45 


99.63 


8.36 


18.32 


7.64 


32.61 


239.96 


Somerset 


185.59 


4.07 


123.35 


5.93 


9.81 


14.06 


28.37 




Talbot 


182.37 


4.17 


123.45 


4.00 


12.52 


13.50 


24.73 


19 ! 74 


Washington 


167.25 


3.01 


128.18 


5.66 


13.20 


4.58 


12.62 


75.03 


Wicomico 


159.96 


3.12 


109.12 


7.83 


11.68 


6.81 


21.40 


2.28 




189.01 


3.28 


123.01 


7.44 


13.79 


9.81 


31.68 


2.28 



* Excludes general control, fixedjcharges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XVIII for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 91 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High 
and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1953 







Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




Salaries of 














Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




vis ionf 


and 




nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








Teachers 












$zo4 . 11 


$4.89 


$190.80 


S15.24 


$22 .58 


$11 .41 


$19 . 19 


$162 .73 


Baltimore City 


314.35 


6.13 


236.99 


17.93 


29.74 


16.22 


7.34 


55.93 


Total Counties 


247.36 


4.48 


175.39 


14.35 


20.19 


9.81 


23.14 


198.36 


Allegany 


230.25 


4.10 


164.96 


14.72 


18.46 


7.91 


20.10 


133.70 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


227.75 


4.27 


165.11 


11.29 


18.35 


8.55 


20.18 


234.32 


Baltimore 


237.58 


5.05 


169.63 


17.30 


14.80 


9.86 


20.94 


287.35 


Calvert 


252.46 




149.33 


7.34 


17.15 


8.22 


70.42 


9.14 


Caroline 


265.48 


4^64 


185.03 


12.09 


19.13 


11.55 


33.04 


11.74 


Carroll 


233.92 


5.98 


174 . 17 


11.31 


15.38 


5.56 


21.52 


40.65 


Cecil 


252.98 


5.85 


175.06 


16.05 


21.83 


11.14 


23.05 


84.56 




260.59 


4.64 


178.27 


13.68 


25.39 


6.36 


32.25 


316.11 




254.58 


3.47 


171.50 


8.20 


20.26 


18.51 


32.64 


550.97 


Frederick 


213.72 


2.75 


159.56 


8.71 


13.85 


4.54 


24.31 


20.99 


Garrett 


254.06 


6.65 


152.31 


12.38 


13.36 


9.38 


59.98 


408.81 


Harford 


230.12 


2.92 


159.30 


14.06 


21.34 


6.54 


25.96 


386.71 




284.72 


4.15 


195.57 


15.08 


20.25 


9.06 


40.61 


154.84 


Kent 


285.92 


5.62 


197.91 


13.62 


20.91 


11.66 


36.20 


185.21 


Montgomery. . . . 


310.28 


6.08 


221.27 


19.10 


35.00 


13.80 


15.03 


295.07 


Prince George's. . 


236.01 


2.72 


167.51 


13.87 


24.50 


10.58 


16.83 


85.15 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


269.57 


5.44 


177.37 


10.59 


23.71 


6.84 


45.62 


66.71 


St. Mary's 


267.97 


6.62 


149.05 


15.84 


19.46 


25.16 


51.84 


136.57 




265.83 


6.72 


188.33 


8.76 


15.26 


12.98 


33.78 


212.91 


Talbot 


245.01 


6.20 


166.90 


12.08 


12.48 


17.11 


30.24 


449.91 




236.50 


4.58 


178.15 


11.81 


16.37 


6.29 


19.30 


0.43 




229.97 


3.13 


159.66 


13.87 


13.08 


9.83 


30.40 


277.09 


Worcester 


263.53 


3.11 


178.56 


15.25 


14.94 


14.95 


36.72 


568.41 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

See TABLES VI and XIX for basic data. 



144 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 92 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1953 









Instructional Service 












Total 


















County 


Current 






Salaries of 






Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 




Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 








visiont 


and 
















Teachers 












Total State 


$185.72 




$4.43 


$133.96 


$12.18 


$13.95 


$10.37 


$10.83 


$70.95 


Baltimore City 


202.81 




4.68 


151.30 


16.46 


15.82 


12.84 


1.71 


73.88 




164.34 




4.12 


112.26 


6.82 


11 .62 


7.27 


22.25 


67.29 




167.90 






125.97 


10.06 


12.27 


15.71 


3.89 


12.84 


Anne Arundel 


145.90 




2!03 


108.93 


4.26 


12.27 


3.58 


14.83 


46.66 


Baltimore 


177.11 




4.43 


123.89 


12.23 


10.69 


15.22 


10.65 


31.46 




144.41 




4.87 


94.56 


4.42 


8.87 


3.49 


28.20 


1.56 


Caroline 


157.24 




4.23 


104.62 


3.32 


7.70 


7.19 


30.18 


22.79 


Carroll 


180.19 




4.35 


119.22 


7.25 


12.44 


2.67 


34.26 


4.25 


Cecil 


174.05 




2.90 


102.90 


5.65 


16.32 


14.21 


32.07 


34.41 




154.95 




2.92 


104.33 


7.99 


13.21 


2.30 


24.20 


112.68 


Dorchester 


148.18 




5.49 


96.44 


3.82 


6.66 


5.96 


29.81 


128.22 


Frederick 


147.22 




3.14 


99.53 


3.45 


11.95 


5.35 


23.80 


159.97 


Garrett 




















Harford 


156! 60 




2i36 


102^22 


i'.hb 


l4!62 


5!74 


24 ! i6 


277 A2 


Howard 


159.73 




4.47 


106.87 


4.74 


7.37 


5.05 


31.23 


109.29 


Kent 


173.09 




5.66 


114.10 


5.40 


10.46 


3.41 


34.06 


91.13 


Montgomery. . . . 


225.24 




3.00 


155.11 


10.87 


17.70 


8.67 


29.89 


79.47 


Prince George's . . 


182.66 




6.16 


123.06 


8.45 


17.14 


12.34 


15.51 


139.31 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


178.25 




5.28 


115.93 


7.65 


8.31 


4.86 


36.22 


1.54 


St. Mary's 


162 . 14 




7.80 


101.34 


4.33 


9.42 


1.82 


37.43 






124.94 




2.73 


85.58 


4.20 


6.57 


4.39 


21.47 




Talbot 


161.52 




3.23 


115.98 


3.10 


9.84 


6.29 


23.08 




Washington 


161.83 






121.91 


4.86 


17.49 


2.00 


15.57 






157.21 




i'.2i 


110.87 


5.81 


6.26 


5.40 


24.63 


'i!63 


Worcester 


137.63 




5.26 


86.00 


6.16 


5.69 


7.34 


27.18 


2.31 



• Excludes general control, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches, 
f Consists of salaries and travel. 
See TABLES VI and XX for basic data. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 93 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior 
High and Vocational Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1953 







Instructional Service 












Total 
















County 


Current 




Salaries of 






Mainte- 


Auxiliary 


Capital 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


nance 


Agencies 


Outlay 


* 




vision f 


and 
















Teachers 












Total State 


$239.85 


$4.37 


$171.79 


$13.72 


$20.92 


$10.20 


$18.85 


$188.55 


Baltimore City 


240.62 


4.47 


180.42 


14.91 


23.36 


12.62 


4.84 


133.47 


Total Counties 


239.07 


4.28 


162.95 


12.50 


18.41 


7.72 


33.21 


245.03 




323.77 




235.74 


20.41 


22.69 


20.34 


24.59 




Anne Arundel. . . . 


211.05 




147.62 


9.98 


16.89 


7.73 


28.83 


2.7Z 




269.99 


9!38 


196.49 


18.03 


21.32 


7.59 


17.18 


178.71 


Calvert 


237.63 




150.45 


12.63 


19.36 


7.49 


47.70 


297.74 


Caroline 


252.00 


2.99 


162.45 


8.49 


14.45 


11.50 


52.12 


107.21 


Carroll 


200.80 


5.68 


139.67 


5.85 


15.14 


3.05 


31.41 


0.56 


Cecil 


280.63 


7.07 


177.29 


14.77 


22.47 


7.02 


52.01 


116.79 


Charles 


214.89 


7.24 


144.31 


10.63 


17.18 


4.73 


30.80 


9.36 




216.16 


1.92 


157 .42 


6.77 


15.53 


1.67 


32.85 


765.43 




165.21 


6.52 


118.13 


7.47 


9.19 


3.46 


20.44 


254.64 






















263 ! 15 


3!86 


194! 97 


19i5i 


14.84 


6.' 65 


23! 32 


3li!75 


Howard 


237.94 


7.24 


163.65 


13.52 


13.34 


3.25 


36.94 


5.19 


Kent 


259.54 


6.96 


162.06 


12.45 


16.74 


7.80 


53.53 


195.62 


Montgomery. . . . 


365.65 


3.96 


231.57 


20.27 


39.10 


17.70 


53.05 


133.37 


Prince George's . . 


236 . 14 


5.14 


150.13 


13.88 


25.12 


10.18 


31.69 


65.98 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


237.52 


4.66 


164.65 


9.59 


15.31 


3.28 


40.03 


95.81 


St. Mary's 


259.65 


6.59 


158.69 


14.20 


18.65 


4.16 


57.36 






180.39 


3.95 


131.06 


5.02 


7.11 


6.42 


26.83 


427.92 


Talbot 


207 . 17 




162 . 14 


5.92 


5.79 


1.82 


31.50 


1,025.67 




268.57 




209.90 


5.32 


30.21 


3.67 


19.47 






236.48 


2!35 


170.85 


14.48 


7.58 


6.64 


34.58 


1,416.42 


Worcester 


195.89 


2.63 


125.08 


10.84 


9.88 


11.46 


36.00 


563.08 



* Excludes general control, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches, 
t Consists of salaries and travel. 
See TABLES VI and XXI for basic data. 



146 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 94 



Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1953 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 




$ 990 


$1 , 436 


$ 513 


$ 906 


1928 




1, 155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1933 




1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1938 




1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1943 




1,539 


1,735 


1,291 


1,450 


1944 




1,805 


1,997 


1,551 


1,705 


1945 




1,862 


2,042 


1,599 


1,719 


1946 




2,027 


2,183 


1,737 


1,845 


1947 




2,306 


2,439 


2,002 


2,100 


1948 




3,234 


3.446 


3,157 


3,178 


1949 




3,236 


3,318 


2,916 


2,885 


1950 




3,342 


3,344 


3,023 


2,888 


1951 




3,418 


3,359 


3,126 


2,934 


1952 




3,637 


3,646 


3,385 


3,272 


1953 




3,733 


3,726 


3,535 


3,358 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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154 



Eighty-Seventh Axntal Report 



I 

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111 



Maeyla>~d State Department of Education" 



TABLE 103 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Pupil Transported: State 
of Maryland: Year Ending June 30. 1953 



Total State . . . 
Baltimore City 



Allezs-v 
Arcce A:.; iA 



enroll 

C«il 

Charles .... 

I re-der::k 

Garrett 
Harford. . . 
533 : — i 
Kent 

Price :-t 3A-: res i 
Q-Cr-er. Accrct i 
St. Mary's. . . 
Suaanet .... 
TaToot 

Wss ' . rr .r:-: r_ 

W;c;^:;r 



N 3 



:-s 

115.99 
32.55 
3S.51 

2: si 
& sfl 
_i - - 

:v2. 

27.05 
31.75 
33.53 

: 

35.34 

62.15 
31.65 

34 ?r 

35 

:: 

50.30 
e 1 . 42 

44 r- 

44.1c 



$31.70 $34.51 

94.38 259.55 



31.25 

ss.43 

24.11 
2-5 1: 

a ■ 

47 . I-f 

26.73 
31.17 
32.56 

-:: 

54 . i 
fA.e:- 

31.25 
31.52 

^4 

15 .51 

20.67 
c . ?? 
49.65 

44 ir- 

45.05 



S4.:: 

35.57 

a -- 

a - 
a 

4r ~f 

a h 

32.65 

s.= .i: 

tl 

St .27 

:r :s 
32.31 
> i -i 
= 1.51 
31.99 

n 

5 . : : 
! S4 
45.95 
42.99 



28.19 25 :: si : 



























$31.58 


£31 3t 






£5 3 


$42.21 


113.76 


85.19 








A1A4I 


31.23 


30.00 


32.78 


39.57 


37.68 


42.18 


38.29 

s 

25.26 
59.40 
47.25 


38.46 
21.85 
— " 
53.99 
47.41 


ss . i : 
17 
- - — 

t-3 53 
47.03 


91.24 

s -: S7 

32.12 
St . A- 
: >r 


4: it 

35.67 

a n 

^: .-S 


105.17 
3" :-! 

39.04 
16 Si 
56.69 


26.08 

37.66 
59.99 

54.4! 


25.61 

36.74 
57.90 
32.75 


26.79 

s : >: 

5 .- A 

— 

36.71 


4f :s 

c7 5: 
2S rS 
t-3 :-5 
47.64 


4; 4t 
>t 

IS 51 

~: s 2 ; 

A: 2s 


41 41 
:r 2c 

3: IS 

:" 52 
51.:.- 


62.15 
31.97 
SS.t-5 
43.51 
23.93 


64.69 
Sic: 
2S.5< 
41.43 
21.16 


59.28 
33.02 

4." .41 
« Bl 
28.21 


29i34 
41 I: 
:: 5: 

^4 ss 


30!50 
A3 : 5 
el 71 
St .S3 


2" tA 

S3 a- 

32 t .- 
cS "I 


20.11 
51.01 
51.63 

a a 

49.55 


i ; - s 
. : i 

51.10 

5 

51.76 


20.63 

as Zz 

52.29 

5 : . ?: 

46.97 


31.18 
^S ^3 
50.99 
K 6 
35.59 


2^ . r- 

9 S 

47 as 

St .42 
3 ! . 54 


3 S : : 
^5 S- 
57.41 

S4 s: 

35.66 


27.67 

cl.4r 


25.10 

4r At 


30.49 
55 .67 


106.96 


13V 23 


l.A 7 c 

4-5 1 S 



156 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 104 

Number of Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public Expense: 
Number of Buses Used: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Number of Different Schools 


Number of Vehicles 




Schools for White Pupils 




Buses Owned by 




UOUNTY 
















Private 




Total 




Com- 




Colored 






Cars and 






Ele- 


bined 


High 


Schools 




Con- 


Station 






mentary 


Elem. & 


School 




County 


tractors 


Wagons 






Only 


High 


Only 










Total State 


695 


367 


72 


78 


178 


376 


1,243 


**t85 


Baltimore City. . 


7 


4 


1 




2 




15 




Total Counties . 


688 


363 


71 


78 


176 


376 


1,228 


**t85 


Allegany 


32 


17 


9 


4 


2 




78 


14 


Anne Arundel t 


51 


29 




7 


15 




101 






68 


40 


'6 


9 


13 


45 


140 


2 


Calvert 


13 


5 


1 




7 


3 


38 




Caroline 


13 


4 


5 




4 




40 




Carroll 


20 


9 


7 


*2 


2 


*6 


56 


*4 


Cecil 


24 


13 


5 


3 


3 


1 


56 


2 


Charles 


21 


2 


4 


1 


14 




48 


6 


Dorchester. . . . 


32 


13 


5 


2 


12 


'i 


50 


4 


Frederick 


34 


19 


5 


3 


7 


18 


81 


*2 


Garrett 


28 


26 




2 




2 


75 


U3 




25 


18 


i 


3 


*3 


30 


60 




Howard 


18 


5 


3 


2 


8 




42 




Kent 


16 


7 


1 


2 


6 




34 


i 


Montgomery . . 


68 


46 


3 


10 


9 


123 






Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 


62 


29 


1 


12 


20 


108 


32 


16 


24 


12 




3 


9 




31 


St. Mary '8 


19 


11 




2 


6 




40 


12 


Somerset 


19 


5 


*3 


2 


9 




43 


t 


Talbot 


20 


7 


1 


2 


10 


3 


31 


1 


Washington . . . 


41 


30 


4 


6 


1 


36 


47 


*3 




21 


10 


3 


1 


7 




54 


3 


Worcester 


19 


6 


4 




9 




51 


2 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes one horse in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

J Excludes>lementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 105 — Federal Vocational Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: 

1952-1953 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


1953 
Allotment 


1953 
Expenditures 


Balance 
June 30, 1953 


Total 

Agriculture 


$320,565.04 

89,730.19 
138,283.10 
68,266.98 
15,630.93 
8,653.84 


$283, 152.81 

89,227.13 
101,373.93 
68,266.98 
15,630.93 
8,653.84 


$37,412.23 

503.06 
36,909.17 















TABLE 106 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 

1952-1953 



Type of 
Vocational Program 

Total Expended in Maryland. . . . 

Instruction in Counties: 

Day Schools — White 

Colored 

Adult Education — White 

Colored .... 

Instruction in Baltimore City: 

Day Schools — White 

Colored 

Adult Education — White 

Colored .... 
Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 

Instruction by the University of 
Maryland : 

Mining 

Volunteer Firemen 

Teacher Training and Guidance 

State Administration and Super- 
vision 



All 
Subjects 



Agri- 
culture 



Trades and 
Industry 



Home 
Economics 



$283, 152.81 



117,318.18 
29,120.08 
35,519.00 
3,097.50 



25,225.04 
15,838.02 
14,588.46 
1,052.21 
2,553.17 



2,096.00 
4,120.00 
3,564.38 



29,060.77 



$93,843.06 



64,654.44 
15,934.33 
3,130.50 
465.00 



1,359.38 



8,299.41 



$104,601.05 



23,476.68 
2,448.75 
14,498.50 



25,225.04 
15,838.02 
8,854.52 
330.67 



2.096.00 
4,120.00 



$76,054.86 



23,302.58 
10,737.00 
17,800.00 
2,632.50 



5.607.75 
721.54 



7,712.87 



2,205.00 
13,048.49 



158 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



> 

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160 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 109— Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland: 1952-53 



County 


Expenditures for Salaries 


Per Cent of 
Salaries 


Expendi- 
tures for 
Purposes 
Other than 
Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Fed- 
eral 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


Other 
Funds 


Grand Total. . . |$361,212.04 


$54,257.17 


$74,000.00 


$232,954.87 


15.0 


20.5 


64.5 


$23,705.77 


$37,714.69 



WHITE 



Total State 

Baltimore City. . . 
Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$257,826.36 
167,565.85 
90,260.51 

9,264.00 
731.50 
19,653.50 
60.00 
304.00 
1,324.50 
866.00 
757.50 
780.50 
514.50 
987.00 
8,970.01 
403.50 
531.00 
20,848.00 
11,545.00 
649.00 
300.00 
220.00 
523.00 
8,918.00 
1,044.00 
1,066.00 



$50,107.46 
14,588.46 
35,519.00 

3,529.50 

11, 062 !66 



352.50 
169.00 



78.00 



2,378.50 
220.00 



8,882.50 
4,663.50 



3,787.50 
156.00 
240.00 



$56,359.00 
8,955.00 
47,404.00 

4,349.00 
731.50 

8,060.50 
60.00 
240.00 
676.00 
632.00 
725.50 
702.50 
514.50 
987.00 

6,042.00 
130.00 
531.00 
10,946.50 

4,982.50 
649.00 
300.00 
220.00 
495.50 

3,717.00 
888.00 
824.00 



$151,359.90 
144.022,39 
7,337.51 

1,385.50 



531.00 



64.00 
296.00 
65.00 
32.00 



549.51 



2.00 



19.4 


21.9 


58.7 


8.7 


5.3 


86.0 


39.4 


52.5 


8.1 


38.1 


46.9 


15.0 




100.0 




56 .3 


41.0 


'2.7 




100.0 






78.9 


21.1 


26". 6 


51.0 


22 A 


19.5 


73.0 


7.5 




95.8 


4.2 


io!6 


90.0 






100.0 






100.0 




26!5 


67.4 


*6ii 


54.5 


32.2 


13.3 




100.0 




42 !6 


52.5 




40.4 


43.2 


16.4 




100.0 






100.0 






100.0 






94.7 


'5!3 


42.' 5 


41.7 


15.8 


14.9 


85.1 




22.5 


77.3 


'o.2 



$14,860.72 
6,724.11 
8,136.61 

133.55 
27.17 
4,121.03 



56.00 
56.00 
92.04 



20.00 
89.00 
2,046.53 



10.00 
1, 485^29 



$36,769.28 

36,769i28 

2,290.97 
281.17 
6, 149.00 



48.00 
116.00 
340.50 



78.00 
1,273!66 



230.00 
15,797.14 
4,715.00 

i56!66 



74.00 
5,043.50 
177.00 



COLORED 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . . 
Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Caroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington. . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$103,385.68 
95,720.68 
7,665.00 



1,560.00 
1,359.00 



491.50 
435.00 



790.00 
55.00 



128.00 
220.00 



90.00 
110.00 
156.00 
360.00 
910.50 



$4,149.71 
1,052.21 
3,097.50 



360.00 
819.00 



225.50 
285.00 



172.50 
55.00 



222.00 



156.00 
360.00 
442.50 



$17,641.00 
13,432.50 
4,208.50 



1,200.00 
540.00 



266.00 
150.00 



386.50 



998.00 



90.00 
110.00 



468.00 



$81,594.97 
81,235.97 
359.00 



231.00 
1128 166 



4.0 


17.1 


78.9 


1.1 


14.0 


84.9 


40.4 


54.9 


4.7 


23 !i 


76!9 




60.3 


39.7 




45^9 


54!i 




65.5 


34.5 




21.8 


48^9 


29l3 


100.0 










100. 6 


i8i2 


81.8 






100 '. 6 






100.0 




i66!6 






100.0 






48.6 


51.i 





$8,845.05 
8,591.79 
253.26 



6.00 
175.31 



71.95 



$945 .41 

945 .a 



284.00 



562.00 

'ii'.ii 



88.00 



Maryland State Department of Education 161 



TABLE 110 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment 
by Subject: State of Maryland: 1952-1953 





Number 


Enrollment 


County 


of 
















Teachers 


Total 


Agri- 


Home 


Industrial 


Business 


General 








culture 


Economics 


Education 


Education 




Grand Total 


916 


24,991 


185 


4,168 


2,429 


5,682 


12,527 



WHITE ADULTS 



Total State 


732 


20,786 


137 


3,208 


2,139 


4,590 


10,712 


Baltimore City 


366 


8,750 




581 


533 


1,694 


5,942 


Total Counties 


366 


12,036 


i37 


2,627 


1,606 


2,896 


4,770 


Allegany 


36 


877 




323 


17 


154 


383 


Anne Arundel. . . . 


5 


109 








55 


54 




46 


2,277 




259 


973 


530 


515 


Calvert 


1 


22 










22 


Caroline 


1 


24 










24, 


Carroll 


4 


123 






17 


35 


71 


Cecil 


8 


202 






15 


176 


11 


Charles 


3 


127 


i9 






82 


26 




8 


180 








32 


148 




3 


78 








46 


32 


Garrett 


8 


210 








80 


130 


Harford 


3 


1,833 


"67 


596 


ei 


449 


660 




5 


68 


26 


18 






24 


Kent 


5 


92 








25 


67 


Montgomery 


62 


2,870 


25 


8i3 


"48 


294 


1,690 


Prince George's.. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


38 


1,646 




529 


186 


516 


415 


8 


127 








52 


75 


St. Mary's 


3 


65 








52 


13 




1 


39 








39 




Talbot 


28 


93 




24 






"69 




48 


673 




33 


289 


167 


184 




20 


177 




14 




56 


107 


Worcester 


22 


124 




18 




56 


50 



COLORED ADULTS 



Total State 


184 


4,205 


48 


960 


290 


1,092 


1,815 


Baltimore City 


148 


3,315 




713 


290 


702 


1,610 


Total Counties 


36 


890 


48 


247 




390 


205 


Allegany 
















Anne Arundel. . . . 


*5 


io3 




'20 






'42 




5 


83 




52 




15 


16 


Calvert 
































Carroll 
















Cecil 
















Charles 


' 'i 


*87 




40 




47 




Dorchester 


2 


54 


si 






23 




Frederick 
















Garrett 
















Harford 


' 3 


88 




is 




42 


si 




1 


13 




13 








Kent 
















Montgomery 

Prince George's.. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 
















' 7 


28i 




50 




200 


3i 
















St. Mary's 


"i 


22 










'22 


Somerset 


l 


18 










18 


Talbot 
















Washington 


"i 


20 




20 








Wicomico 


6 


121 


'ii 


37 




22 


45 



















162 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 111— Adult Education Program: Titles of Courses Offered: Counties 
of Maryland: 1952-1953 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Care of Light Horses 

Farm Machinery Repair 

Home Beautification and Gardening 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Home Furnishing 

Millinery 

SliplCovers and Reupholstery 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Air-Estimating 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Drafting 

Electric Arc and Acetylene Welding 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Industrial Safety 

Plastics 

Machine Shop 

Master Lines 

Mechanical Drawing 

Precision Instrument 

Radio and Television 

Shop Mathematics 

Woodworking and Cabinetmaking . 

Total 



Number 
of Classes 



87 
7 
5 
6 
8 
4 

117 



Title of Course 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 

General 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Ceramics 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

English 

Fundamentals 

History 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Interior Decorating 

Jewelry 

Lipreading 

Mathematics 

Modern Foreign Languages . . . 
Music-Instrumental and Vocal 

Photography 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Recreation 

Science 

Sewing 

Shop 

Speech 

Woodwork and Metalcraft 

Total 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 111-B— Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City: 

1952 and 1953 







Net Roll, 


February 




Type of Class 


White 


Colored 




1952 


1953 


1952 


1953 


Total 


9,097 


9,826 


4,455 


3,665 


Americanization 


880 


693 








71 


192 


508 


42 i 




1,039 


1,058 


1,162 


574 


Commercial (Distributive Education) 


1,670 


1,694 


859 


702 


Vocational: 












429 


533 


296 


290 




626 


581 


778 


713 




1,353 


1,747 


445 


594 




211 


352 


20 


21 


Informal Program (Noncredit) 


1,784 


1,868 


19 




Speech and Lip Reading Classes 


11 


32 


5 




Vocational Education (Veterans) 


157 


149 


363 


350 


Foremanship and Apprentice Training 


866 


927 






Total Number of Principals and Teachers 


370 


366 


170 


148 



TABLE 112 

Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training in Vocational 
Education: State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30 1953 



Source of Expenditures 


Type of Vocational Program 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total 

State and University Funds . . . 


$33,785.54 
32,258.48 

30,221.16 
28,694.10 

3,564.38 
3,564.38 


$9,920.62 
9,411.62 

8,561.24 
8,052.24 

1,359.38 
1,359.38 


$8,221.89 
7,712.87 

8,221.89 
7,712.87 


$15,643.03 
15,133.99 

13,438.03 
12,928.99 

2,205.00 
2,205.00 




State Administration and Super- 
vision 




Federal Funds 

Teacher Training 

University of Maryland Funds 
Federal Funds 















164 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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167 



TABLE 116 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation as 

of June 30, 1953 



COUNTT 


Bcnool rJoncls 
Outstanding 
June 30, 1953 


lyol Assessed 
Valuation Tax- 
able at Full Rate 
for County 
Purposes 


Assessed Valua- 
tion per Dollar of 
School Bonded 
Indebtedness 


.rer i^eni 
School Bonded 
Indebtedness Is 
of Assessed 
Valuation 


Total State 


$173,487,432 


54,831,303,076 


$28 


3.6 


Baltimore City 


t35,513,041 


J2, 111, 566, 736 


59 


1.7 




137,974,391 


2,719,736,340 


20 


5.1 


Allegany 


3, 172,000 


151,384,858 


48 


2.1 




12, 131,000 


tl61, 131,352 


13 


7.5 




40,491,779 


J647, 143,935 


16 


6.3 


Calvert 


1,435,441 


13,472,542 


9 


10.7 


Caroline 


623, 158 


24,330, 156 


39 


2.6 


Carroll 


1,200,000 


75,349,701 


63 


1.6 


Cecil 


1,340,000 


$65,543,005 


49 


2.0 


Charles 


1,553,521 


$23,303,489 


15 


6.7 


Dorchester 


2,340, 180 


51,379,665 


22 


4.5 




1,753,583 


106,489.360 


61 


1.6 




1,750,000 


27,214,732 


15 


6.4 




6,077,976 


1103,033,040 


17 


5.9 




1,739,875 


33,879,545 


19 


5.1 


Kent 


1,337,381 


23,965,965 


18 


5.6 


Montgomery 


31,989,975 


$496,971,490 


15 


6.4 


Prince George's 


20,430,964 


J332, 146,987 


16 


6.1 


Queen Anne's 


740.468 


28,084,813 


38 


2.6 




726,493 


21,464,554 


29 


3.4 




t733,406 


19,806,596 


27 


3.7 


Talbot 


1,362, 191 


36,888.610 


27 


3.7 




756,000 


153,431,266 


203 


0.5 




2,984,000 


77,281,439 


26 


3.9 




1,305,000 


46,039,240 


35 


2.8 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 

t Sinking Fund balances have been deducted as follows: Somerset, $88,371.34; Baltimore City, 
$2,285,959.32. 

$ Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



168 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 117 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belonging: 1952-53 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City. 

Total Counties . 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick 



School 
Bonded 
Indebted- 



$439.60 

275.63 

519.08 

209.77 
554.25 
855.01 
482.34 
166.98 

145.33 
201.53 
284.37 
467.66 
159.79 



Interest 
Payments 



$7.82 

4.79 

9.29 

5.42 
11.01 
11.98 
9.11 
2.87 

2.42 
3.39 
5.96 
6.81 
3.09 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



School 




Bonded 


Interest 


Indebted- 


Payments 


ness 




$393.79 


$8.10 


576.60 


14.44 


371.13 


7.12 


497.72 


8.01 


840.65 


14.69 


537.84 


11.84 


249.99 


3.45 


211.62 


2.62 


193.05 


2.90 


378.07 


6.63 


50.29 


0.63 


435.81 


8.40 


303.21 


5.87 



TABLE 118 

Value of School Property: State of Maryland: 1923-1953 





Value 


of School Property*! 


Value per Pupil Enrolled 


Yeak 


Total 
State 


Baltimore 
City 


Total 
Counties 


Total 
State 


Baltimore 
City 


Total 
Counties 


1923 

1928 

1933 

1938 

1943 


$22,236,638 
51,765,517 
66,030,676 
81,336,202 
89,953,989 


$10, 440, 008 
32,770,847 
40,679,936 
49,633,230 
50,463,694 


$11,796,630 
18,994,670 
25,350,740 
31,702,972 
39,490,295 


$87 
191 
225 
277 
300 


$100 
291 
335 
410 
430 


$77 
120 
147 
184 
217 


1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 


89,951,808 
89,660,481 
94,935,593 
96,879,433 
104,461,410 


50, 127,722 
49,726,430 
49,726,430 
49,800,279 
50,639,234 


39,824,086 
39,934,051 
45,209, 163 
47,079, 154 
53,822,176 


304 
303 
320 
322 
338 


427 
437 
442 
440 
437 


223 
219 
245 
251 
278 


1949 

1950. 

1951 

1952 

1953 


120,474,231 
147,205,363 
179,725,597 
205,918,642 
255,771,447 


50,258,400 
50,659, 159 
50,659,159 
50,647,823 
61,881,725 


70,215,831 
96,546,204 
129,066,438 
155,270,819 
193,889,722 


373 
429 
490 
533 
619 


428 
417 
405 
394 
455 


342 
435 
533 
603 
699 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con. 
struction or no longer in use. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 119 



Value of Maryland School Property* per Pupil Belonging: Year Ending June 30, 1953 





All Schools 


Schools for White 


Schools for Colored 








Pupils 


Pupils 


County 
















Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 




Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State 


%9 f \ t i 771 447 


ttfi4R 1 n 


$220,741,514 


$707.42 


$35,029,933 


$424.05 


Baltimore City. . . 


161,881,725 


480.29 


t48,797,454 


592.32 


tl3,084,271 


281.63 


Total Counties . . . 


193,889,722 


729.45 


171,944,060 


748.71 


21,945,662 


607.08 


Allegany 


11,447,431 


757.05 


11,308,481 


761.99 


138,950 


495.37 


Anne Arundel . . 


17,506,950 


799.88 


14, 192,500 


817.83 


3,314,450 


731.17 




35,594,643 


751.62 


32,648,563 


751.79 


2,946,080 


749.69 




2,056,231 


690.89 


1, 172,250 


789.82 


883,981 


592.48 




2,457,293 


658.44 


2,043,645 


718.45 


413,648 


466.08 


Carroll 


6,131,550 


742.60 


5,837,150 


745.46 


294,400 


690.11 


Cecil 


5,431,750 


816.91 


5, 175,050 


838.20 


256,700 


540.31 


Charles 


3,077,750 


563.38 


1,865,600 


612.35 


1,212, 150 


501.63 


Dorchester .... 


3,467,364 


692.90 


2,477,387 


718.87 


989, 977 


635.45 




7,408,680 


675 . 14 


6,833,630 


686.52 


575, 050 


564.05 




2,566,970 


577.61 


2,566,970 


577.61 








7,935,600 


752.82 


7,247,650 


771.81 


687,950 


597.85 




2,777,300 


592.44 


2,364,000 


633.27 


413,300 


432.82 


Kent 


1,718,305 


639.51 


1,375,940 


727.43 


342,365 


430.43 


Montgomery. . . 


33,417,964 


878.18 


31,250, 152 


880.31 


2,167,812 


848.56 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


27,663,019 


728.22 


23,680,562 


727.11 


3,982,457 


734.85 


2,172,800 


733.51 


1,724,200 


810.32 


448,600 


537.63 


St. Mary's 


1,053,850 


306.99 


660, 950 


277.72 


392,900 


373 . 16 


Somerset 


1,226,610 


322.86 


1,105,810 


495.19 


120, 800 


77.13 


Talbot 


2,561,073 


710.80 


1,715,631 


700.97 


845,442 


731.60 


Washington .... 


8,464,257 


563.03 


7,966,257 


541.29 


498, 000 


1,574.95 




5,706,032 


833.33 


5,283,832 


1,039.35 


422,200 


239.41 




2,046,300 


475.42 


1,447,850 


529.03 


598, 450 


381.81 



* Excludes administration buildings, teacherages, janitors' homes, warehouses, storage buildings, repaii 
shops, and buildiings under construction or no longer in use. 
t Value of equipment has been excluded. 



170 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 120 

Revenue and Appropriations: Maryland Counties and Baltimore City: 1952-53 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityf. • 

Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundelf. 
Baltimore! .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carrollf 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchesterf • . . 
Frederick^ 

Garrettf 

Harfordf 

Howardf 

Kentf 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne'sf- 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washingtonf. . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total Revenue 
of the Counties 
and Baltimore 
City* 



$133,241,157.89 

68,284,476.60 

64,956,681.29 

3,246,047.35 
4,571,960.20 
15,201, 184.67 
441,480.17 
503,439.49 

1,672,640.29 
1,247,607.09 
675,774.02 
789,473.50 
1,817,952.90 

1,131,478.51 
2, 156,480.45 
1,092,648.14 
580,316.98 
12,861,255.36 

9,693,261.95 
557,557.28 
624,459.53 
437,664.14 
821,463.06 

2,627.375.83 
1,433,392.33 
771,768.05 



Appropriations for Public SchoolsJ 



Total for 
Schools 



$64,395, 145.41 

26,153,967.06 

38,241,178.35 

1,807,225.54 
2,210, 130.23 
8,733,385.46 
173,028.67 
280,652.51 

922,432.35 
709,969.30 
365,981.14 
442,022.42 
1,323,805.38 

398,687.06 
1, 101,991.52 
434,893,89 
349,409.01 
8,149, 195.25 

6,218,926.19 
298,766.61 
238,816.32 
213,354.36 
624,595.85 

1,848,707.25 
930,927.04 
464,275.00 



Current 
Expenses 



$53,730,066.40 

23,995, 195.61 

29,734,870.79 

1,454,255.54 
1,557,609.60 
7,410, 112.44 
97,468.03 
261,819.02 

668, 247 . 17 
639,792.98 
272,942.68 
379, 197.80 
957,436.33 

215,272.81 
879,506.38 
352,883.00 
260,645.16 
6,463,225.59 

4,406,809.22 
238,321.77 
182, 182.15 
150,000.00 
308,202.56 

1,484,919.73 
720,020.83 
374,000.00 



Debt 
Service 



$8,801,460.28 

1,724,265.00 

7,077,195.28 

347,970.00 
652,520.63 
1,237.733.13 
75,560.64 
18,833.49 

58,570.74 
70,176.32 
76,438.46 
47,710.91 
128,863.62 

106,312.50 
161,378.25 
59,484.89 
84,888.85 
1,685,969.66 

1,688,209.16 
45,767.93 
45,494.52 
50, 425.85 
101,684.48 

90,428.75 
152,497.50 
90,275.00 



Capital 
Outlay 



$1,863,618.73 
434,506.45 
1,429,112.28 
5,000.00 
85, 539! 89 



195,614.44 



16,600.00 
15, 113.71 
237,505.43 

77,101.75 
61, 106.89 
22,526.00 
3,875.00 



123,907.81 
14,676.91 
11, 139.65 
12,928.51 

214,708.81 

273,358.77 
58,408.71 



Appropriation 
for 
Operating 
Expenses of 
Libraries 



$2,407,047.00 
1,779,690.00 
627,357.00 



31,659.00 
134,197.00 



18,784.00 
8,500.00 
1,750.00 
7,500.00 

5,290.00 
21,557.00 
6,594.00 
250.00 
226,604.00 

93,738.00 
9,292.00 
8,908.00 
500.00 
8,233.00 

28,500.00 
15,501.00 



t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1952. 

JFigures from annual financial reports of County Departments of Education adjusted to conform to county's 
fiscal period. 

° Figures from certificates received from librarians. 



Maryland State Department of Education 171 
CHART 5 

Per Cent of Total Revenues Appropriated for Public Schools : Counties and Incorporated 
Places in Maryland: 1952-53 (1952*) 



County 

Total State 
Baltimore City- 
Total Counties 

Baltimore 
Cecil 

Washington 
Montgomery 
Caroline 
Kent 

Prince George* £ 

Charles 

Queen Anne's 

Frederick 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Carroll 

Howard 

Worcester 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Garrett 



Total 

hk.6 

38.3 

$0.2 

57.1* 

1*8.1 

$3.1 
53.6 

1*3.3 

$3.9 

$1*.9 

$1.2 

1*7.$ 

1*9.0 

13.2 

39.1 
13.1 
1*5.7 
39.8 
39.7 
37.9 
1*2.1* 
60.1 
36.2 
39.0 
3U.5 
32.2 



■ Current 
Expenses 
10 20 
I 1 r ~ 



30 



□Debt Service and 
Capital Outlay 
1*0 $0 60 70 








|7-4l 


m 




'2-3 1 


29-7 


30 4 


27-6 






* Calendar year 1952. 



172 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



5 J 



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173 



TABLE 122 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates : 

1952-53 



County 


Calculated 
Total 


Public School 

Current 
Expenses 


Tax Rates* 

Debt Service 
and 
Capital 
Outlay 


Published 
Tax Rates 


Additional 
Rates in 
Districts 
and 
Incorporated 
Placesfc 


Total State 


$1.33 


$1.12 


$0.21 






Baltimore Cityt 


1 .30 


1.20 


0.10 


$2.82 




Total Counties 


1 .35 


1 .06 


0.29 






Allegany 


1.19 


0.96 


0.23 


1.82 


$0.10-$1.28 


Anne Arundelf. . . ■ 


1.32 


t0. 92 


0.40 


al.69 


1.00- 1.34 


Baltimoret 


1.34 


£. 18 


0.21 


1.58 




Calvert 


1.24 


10. 70 


0.54 


1.96 


0.75- i. 40 


Caroline 


1.04 


0.97 


0.07 


1.57 


0.25- 1.15 


Carrollf 


1.11 


0.81 


0.30 


1.35 


0.50- 0.85 


Cecil 


• 1.02 


10.92 


0.10 


1.38 


0.20- 1.33 




1.46 


U.09 


0.37 


1.55 


0.50- 0.80 




1.01 


0.83 


0.18 


1.40 


0.50- 0.88 


Frederickf 


1.01 


t0. 83 


0.18 


1.40 


0.10- 1.45 


Garrettt 


1.49 


0.76 


0.73 


2.00 


0.30- 0.90 


Harfordf 


1.08 


JO. 76 


0.31 


1.38 


0.95- 1.10 


Howard t 


1.32 


1.06 


0.26 


al.85 




Kentf 


1.45 


1.04 


0.41 


2.00 


0.25^0. 90 




1.60 


J1.27 


0.33 


o2.10 


0.10- 1.03 


Prince George's 


1.79 


tl.27 


0.52 


al.98 


0.25- 3.32 


Queen Anne'sf 


1.19 


0.91 


0.28 


1.60 


0.20- 0.90 


St. Mary's 


0.95 


JO. 72 


0.23 


1.50 


0.90 


Somerset 


1.01 


0.71 


0.30 


1.65 


0.60- 1.50 


Talbot 


cl.63 


0.80 


c0.83 


1.70 


0.85- 1.25 




1.06 


1.00 


0.06 


1.50 


0.35- 0.75 




1.15 


0.89 


0.26 


1.55 


0.30- 1.12 


Worcester 


1.00 


0.81 


0.19 


1.35 


0.65- 1.40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valuations, 
t Calendar year fiscal period. 

t Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874. 

° Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax is excluded* 

o Excludes rates for special service levies. 

b Figures are from report of State Fiscal Research Bureau. 

c Includes allocation of county surplus ($214,708.81). 



174 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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176 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 125 



Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 1952-53 











County 


Full Rate for County 

J- UI ^UOCQ 


Pupils Belonging 


We&ltta. p6r Pupil 


Total State 


$4,859,690,500 


394,646 


$12,314 


Baltimore City 


*2, 125,859,646 


128, 842 


16, 500 




2,733,830,854 


265,804 


10, 285 




151,384,858 


15, 121 


10,011 




♦161,320,819 


21,887 


7,371 




♦651,797,919 


47,358 


13,763 


Calvert 


13,472,542 


2,976 


4,527 




24,330,156 


3,732 


6,519 


Carroll 


•75,349,701 


8,257 


9,125 


Cecil 


66, 117,505 


6,649 


9,944 




23,364,629 


5,463 


4,277 




♦51,379,665 


5,004 


10,268 




♦106,489,360 


10, 974 


9,704 




♦27,214,732 


4,444 


6,124 




♦106,830,832 


10,541 


10, 135 




♦33,879,545 


4,688 


7,227 




♦23,965,965 


2,687 


8,919 




497,889,590 


38, 054 


13,084 


Prince George's 


336,046,518 


37,987 


8,846 




♦28,084,813 


2,962 


9,482 




21,464,554 


3,433 


6,252 




19,806,596 


3,799 


5,214 


Talbot 


36,888,610 


3,603 


10,238 




♦153,431,266 


15,034 


10,206 




77,281,439 


6,847 


11,287 




46,039,240 


4,304 


10,697 



•Calendar year (1952). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



CHART 6 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore City: 

1952-53 



County 

Total State 

Baltimore City 

Total Counties 

Montgomery 

Baltimore 

Talbot 

Prince George's 

Washington 

Queen Anne's 

Howard 

Harford 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel 

Kent 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Carroll 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Caroline 

Calvert 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 



""^er^ap^a^ncome Tax 
6 8 10 12 1U 16 
T 1 1 1 I I 



18 20 




Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury of Maryland, Fiscal Year 1953; 1952-53 population 
estimates from Maryland State Health Department. 



178 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



CHARTS 7 and 8 

Per Capita Income Payments in Eleven States, Including Maryland: 1951-52: 
Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1952 



1 Delaware 

2 Nevada 

3 Connecticut 
h New York 

5 California 

6 Illinois 

7 New Jersey 

8 Ohio 

9 Michigan 

10 Washington 

11 Maryland 



Per Capita Income Payments (in Hundreds of Dollars) 

2 U 6 8 10 12 Hi 16 18 20 22 21* 

1 1 ' 



i — r 





1953 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce* Survey of Current Business, August 1953. 



Maryland State 



Department of 



Education 



179 



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umem 



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180 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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181 



TABLE 128 



Total Enrollment* at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fall of 1943-1952 





Grand 


Total 








Total 






Fall of 


Total 


White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Colored 


Bowie 


CoPPIN 


1943 


776 


537 


96 


154 


287 


239 


109 


130 


1944 


684 


440 


83 


120 


237 


244 


110 


134 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1, 178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,704 


1,372 


336 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1,688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 


1950 


2,054 


1,634 


441 


273 


920 


420 


221 


199 


1951 


1,944 


1,496 


403 


213 


880 


448 


268 


180 


1952 


2, 136 


1,609 


478 


266 


865 


527 


323 


204 



* Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students. 



TABLE 129— Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1952 





Grand 
Total 


Maryland State Teachers College Enrollment 


Class 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 



TEACHER TRAINING 



Total 


1,733 


1,206 


285 


130 


791 


527 


323 


204 


Freshmen 


553 


362 


70 


50 


242 


191 


114 


77 


Sophomore .... 


371 


246 


45 


29 


172 


125 


80 


45 


Junior 


385 


295 


82 


19 


194 


90 


51 


39 




418 


297 


88 


32 


177 


121 


78 


43 


Fifth Year .... 


6 


6 






6 








JUNIOR COLLEGE 


Total 


259 


259 


82 


103 


74 








Freshmen 


207 


207 


65 


81 


61 








Sophomore .... 


52 


52 


17 


22 


13 









OTHER STUDENTS 



Extension and 


















Evening 


144 


144 


111 


33 










Elementary School . 


664 


562 


165 


130 


267 


i02 


i02 





182 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 131 — Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges 
by County— Class: Fall of 1952 



Junior College Enrollment in Maryland State Teachers Colleges 



Area 


Grand Total 


White 


Ccl °ed 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 


Total 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Grand Total 


259 


207 


52 


65 


17 


81 


22 


61 


13 










Out-of-State 


13 


12 


1 


1 




11 


1 














Baltimore City .... 


25 


20 


5 










20 


5 












221 


175 


46 


64 


17 


70 


21 


41 


8 










Allegany 


76 


61 


15 


61 


15 


















Anne Arundel. . . 


5 


5 












*5 












Baltimore 


24 


19 


5 










19 


5 










Calvert 


1 


1 












1 














4 


4 








4 
















Carroll 


2 


1 


1 










1 


1 










Cecil 


3 


3 








o 




1 














5 


5 








3 




2 












Dorchester 


7 


6 


i 






6 
















Frederick 


4 


3 


l 


'i 








*2 


i 










Garrett 


3 


2 


l 


2 


1 


















Harford 


8 


8 












3 












Howard 


1 


1 












1 












Kent 


1 


1 
























Montgomery .... 


1 


1 












i 












Prince George's. . 


2 


2 












2 












Queen Anne's.. . . 


3 


3 
























St. Mary's 






























io 


*8 


2 




i 


'8 


i 














Talbot 


3 


1 


2 






1 


2 
















48 


33 


15 






30 


14 


3 


l 












10 


7 


3 






7 


3 














Worcester 





























184 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 132— Enrollment in Public Junior Colleges: State of Maryland: 

Fall of 1952 



Area 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Baltimore 
Citt 


Hagers- 
town 


Mont- 
gomery 


Carver 


Grand Total 


951 


915 


358 


132 


425 


36 




135 


134 




7 
t 




I 


Baltimore City. . . 


314 


314 


313 


1 






Total Counties. . . 


502 


467 


45 


124 


298 


35 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Calvert 


*2 
40 


'2 
40 


i 

40 




i 




Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 


1 
1 

2 


1 
1 

2 


1 

'i 


i 


i 




Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 


2 
1 

289 


'2 
1 

256 


'2 




i 

256 


33 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 


41 


39 






39 


2 


Washington. . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


123 


123 




123 







Maryland State Department of Education 185 
TABLE 133 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1944-1953 







Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees 


To 
State 



FROSTBURG 



1944 


75 


$*85,257 


$ 13,536 


$♦71,721 


$1,136 


$ al80 


$ 956 


1945 


73 


*85,601 


14,573 


•71,028 


1,173 


a200 


973 


1946 


91 


108,882 


11,281 


97,601 


1,197 


6124 


1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


6127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


6178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


6203 


672 


1950 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


6134 


567 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


6170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275,880 


942 


6126 


816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88,372 


313,886 


1,078 


6237 


841 



SALISBURY 



1944 


114 


$*87,428 


$ 22,572 


$♦64,856 


$ 767 


$ al98 


$ 569 


1945 


103 


*93,031 


21,157 


♦71,874 


903 


a205 


698 


1946 


153 


104,121 


22, 184 


81,937 


681 


6145 


536 


1947 


280 


145,226 


46,960 


98, 266 


519 


6168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 


700 


6236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


6211 


684 


1950 


286 


270, 107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


6194 


750 


1951 


200 


268, 942 


38, 999 


229, 943 


1,345 


6195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260, 170 


1,626 


6131 


1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


6231 


1,262 



TOWSON 



1944 


234 


$♦208,906 


$ 43,145 


$*165,761 


$ 892 


$ a 184 


$ 708 


1945 


222 


♦211,981 


46,227 


*165,754 


955 


a208 


747 


1946 


264 


250,048 


32,550 


217,498 


947 


6123 


824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


6142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328, 034 


689 


6164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


6113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


6106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107, 164 


525,981 


720 


6122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


6109 


777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121,076 


721,839 


990 


6142 


848 



BOWIE 



1944 


103 


$♦72,307 


$ 14,939 


$♦57,368 


$ 702 


$ dl45 


$ 557 


1945 


103 


♦76,536 


15,099 


♦61,437 


743 


dl45 


598 


1946 


121 


93,004 


17,055 


75,949 


769 


el41 


628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


el44 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140, 181 


1,073 


/151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


/181 


915 


1950 


207 


212.373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


/127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


/155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


/125 


872 


1953 


331 


316,737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


/180 


777 


COPPIN 


1951 


195 
177 
197 


$ 57,054 
59,415 
126,542 




$ 57,054 
59,415 
121,152 


$ 293 
336 
642 




$ 293 
336 
615 


1952 






1953 


5,390 


$ 27 



* Includes bonus payments by State. 

a Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 

6 In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for white teacher training students at the 
Teachers Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Board is $216 for teacher training students 
planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college students who are residents of Maryland pay $100 addi- 
tional, out-of-state students, $200. 

d Resident students paid $140. There is no tuition fee. 

e Resident students paid $155. There is no tuition fee. 

/ Resident students paid $171 . There is no tuition fee except for out-of-state and junior college students. 



186 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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187 



TABLE 136 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active Service 
and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1953 



County or Institution 



Amount Contributed Year 
Ending July 31, 1953 



Members in Active Service 
May 31, 1953 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments . . 

Junior Colleges 

Hagerstown 

Montgomery 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments. 

County Libraries 

Education 

Retirement 

Other Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys . . . 

Montrose School for Girls 

Rosewood State Training School. 
St. Mary's Seminary — Jr. College 



$1,659,549.68 

$1,545,849.77 

109,205.52 
111,990.29 
271, 133.40 
12,572.49 
22,716.31 
47,542.00 
31,572.69 
29,249.73 
37,750.38 
54,238.70 
28, 137.73 
62,568.35 
33,702.69 
18,250.39 
228,736.24 
180,211.09 
17,068.11 
11,516.90 
20,684.45 
22, 171.83 
111,378.60 
60,090.52 
23,361.36 

$113,699.91 

$ 8,427.80 
3,273.50 
5,154.30 

$ 55,048.55 
5,012.96 
2,718.50 
13,213.69 
7,582.00 
26,521.40 

$ 31,632.11 
6,816.98 
24,421.53 
393.60 

$ 18,591.45 
1, 118.80 
8,258.62 
5,529.87 
666.72 
1,930.94 
1,086.50 



8,407 

8,008 

558 
517 

1,431 
92 
133 
273 
184 
177 
180 
310 
161 
310 
162 
102 

1,128 
952 
111 
73 
136 
121 
509 
240 
148 



15 
18 

176 

22 
8 
35 
29 



114 
40 
72 

2 

76 

6 
25 



188 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 137 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 
Years Ending June 30, 1952 and 1953 



County 




White 


Schools 






Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1952 


1953 


1952 


1953 


1952 


1953 


1952 


1953 




504 


533 


89.4 


92.4 


188 


179 


88.7 


91.8 


Allegany 


33 


32 


86.8 


88.9 


2 


1 


100.0 


50.0 


Anne Arundel 


37 


39 


100.0 


100.0 


24 


22 


100.0 


100.0 




51 


56 


94.4 


96.5 


14 


14 


100.0 


100.0 


Calvert 


6 


6 


100.0 


100.0 


13 


9 


92.9 


100.0 




9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 


3 


4 


75.0 


100.0 


Carroll 


18 


17 


94.7 


89.5 


2 


2 


100.0 


100.0 


Cecil 


17 


17 


77.3 


77.3 


3 


3 


100.0 


100.0 


Charles 


8 


8 


100.0 


100.0 


17 


14 


94.4 


100.0 




6 


16 


23.1 


64.0 




11 




91.7 




22 


25 


78.6 


83.3 


' *5 


6 


62^5 


75.0 


Garrett 


27 


27 


77.1 


84.4 












23 


24 


100.0 


100.0 




' 2 




66 .7 


Howard 


9 


10 


100.0 


100.0 


" 8 


9 


88^9 


100.0 


Kent 


10 


10 


100.0 


100.0 


6 


6 


100.0 


100.0 


Montgomery 


58 


68 


100.0 


100.0 


13 


9 


100.0 


90.0 




58 


58 


96.7 


100.0 


25 


23 


100.0 


100.0 


Queen Anne's 


11 


12 


68.8 


80.0 


9 




90.0 






11 


9 


84.6 


69 2 


7 


' 6 


100.0 


85^7 




12 


12 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 


Talbot 


12 


11 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


10 


90.0 


100.0 




40 


41 


93.0 


95.3 


1 


1 


100.0 


100.0 


Wicomico 


16 


16 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 




10 


10 


100.0 


100.0 


9 


9 


100.0 


100.0 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



TABLE 138— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1943-1952; and by 

Type of School: 1952 









Net Roll at End of Term 
















JNumoer 


Year 


Number 


Total 








of 





of 


Enroll- 




Taking 


Principals 


Type op School 


ocnools 


ment 


Total 




















x 1 - l' > ■ ' i a 










Review 


Advance 












Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1 Q,1 Q 




A "idT 
O, OOl 


5,483 


4, 548 


935 


130 


1944 


13 


6 874 


5,976 


5, 108 


868 


142 






o, too 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 




1 o 


A OK 1 


6, 159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950 


5 


4,010 


3.628 


2,990 


638 


78 


1951 


5 


4, 145 


3,710 


3,258 


452 


80 


1952 


5 


4,234 


3,945 


3,564 


381 


80 


White Schools 


3 


3,020 


2,852 


2,631 


221 


56 




2 


2,851 


2,683 


2,631 


52 


48 


Senior 


1 


1,540 


1,401 


1,349 


52 


28 




1 


1,311 


1,282 


1,282 




20 




1 


169 


169 




169 


8 


Colored Schools 


2 


1,214 


1,093 


933 


160 


24 




1 


1,050 


940 


933 


7 


16 


Senior! 


1 


327 


311 


304 


7 


5 


Junior/ 




723 


629 


629 




11 


Demonstration 


1 


164 


153 




153 


8 



* No elementary review schools beginning 1948. 



TABLE 139 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland : 1944-53 







Applicants 






Year Ending 






Number of 




June 30 


Nonhigh School 


High School 


Certificates Issued 






Graduates* 


Graduates t 




1944 




55 




9 


1945 




72 




26 


1946 




1,128 




477 


1947 




2,411 


148 


1, 169 


1948 




1,469 


129 


tl,525 


1949 




1,129 


156 


°1,288 


1950 




1,081 


81 


xl,079 


1951 




912 


52 


a939 


1952 




779 


51 


61,107 


1953 




1,005 


59 


cl,313 



* Includes re-tests. 

t Includes high school graduates who took tests at request of colleges, 
t Includes 443 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
° Includes 457 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
x Includes 332 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services, 
o Includes 291 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 
b Includes 5S0 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services, 
c Includes 613 certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services. 



190 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 140 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1953 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's .... 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total 

Number 
Cases 



Reha- 
bilitated 



4,288 


1, 001 


2, 023 


401 


2,265 


600 


183 


53 


168 


36 


340 


70 


11 


3 


44 


15 


91 


14 


64 


20 


35 


14 


59 


15 


125 


34 


60 


12 


88 


37 


38 


8 


44 


11 


195 


54 


232 


65 


30 


11 


38 


14 


46 


12 


32 


12 


173 


53 


134 


31 


35 


6 



Being 
Followed 
on Jobs 



Training 
Completed 



287 
123 
164 

13 
6 

27 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 

18 
6 
4 
1 
1 

21 

15 
4 
2 
2 
1 

16 

11 
4 



Being 
Prepared 
for Jobs 



735 

324 

411 

22 
37 
59 

9 
23 
12 

1 

7 
19 
13 
13 
10 

9 
35 
57 

4 

4 
10 

3 
26 
29 

9 



Surveyed: 

Being 
Counseled 



1,504 

747 

757 

61 
66 
123 
5 
11 
26 
22 
14 
20 
38 
18 
21 
15 
12 
63 
83 
10 
15 
11 
12 
52 
50 
9 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Character- 
istic 


Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Othert 


Total Number 


4,288 


1,001 


3,287 


Age 

Under 21. . . . 


1,224 


213 


1,011 


21-30 


911 


247 


664 


31^0 


857 


229 


628 


41-50 


763 


200 


563 


Over 50 


533 


112 


421 


Education 










88 


17 


71 


1-3 


270 


45 


225 


4-6 


848 


178 


670 


7-9 


1,532 


379 


1, 153 


10-12 


812 


191 


621 


H.S. Graduate 


480 


128 


352 


13-14 


105 


28 


77 


15-16 


69 


24 


45 


College 


36 


9 


27 


Unknown 


48 


2 


46 


Dependents 











2,724 


559 


2.165 


1 


545 


144 


401 


2 


369 


104 


265 


3 


260 


90 


170 


4 


159 


38 


121 


5 


86 


32 


54 




145 


34 


111 



Character- 




istic 


Total 


Race 




White 


3, 145 


Negro 


1,142 


Other 


1 


Sex 




Male 


2,865 


Female 


1,423 


Marital Status 




Single 


2,202 


Married. . . . 


1,452 


Other 


634 


Employment 




History (At 




Survey) 




Employed 


351 


Unemployed 


3,937 


Never 




worked . . . 




Worked at 




some time 




Number on 




Welfare 




(at Sur- 




vey) 


548 



Reha- 
bilitated' 



767 
234 



645 
356 



429 
426 
146 



139 

155 
707 

97 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,001). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,287). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



TABLE 141 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1953 





Total 


Number of 


Average 


Type of Service 


Expenditure 


Clients 


Cost 


Total Expenditure 


$268,261.97 






Examinations 








Medical 


10,096.38 


1, 139 


$8.86 


Psychiatric 


' 800 . 00 


35 


22.86 


Surgery and Treatment 








Aledical 


4 228.96 


71 


59 56 




3^ 087^00 


38 


8K24 




12,411.18 


113 


109.83 


Dental. . 


2,370.00 


24 


98.75 


Physical and occupational therapy 


9, 560.76 


77 


124 . 17 


Prosthetic Appliances 










lO, y-17 . HO 


1 HQ 


1 VZ. AA 
I/O .44 


Braces 


5, 753 .47 


88 


65 .38 


Hearing aids 


4] 697 . 53 


53 


88^63 


Glasses and artificial eyes 


' 995 13 


68 


14.63 


Surgical appliances 


2,360.55 


95 


24.85 




1,343.40 


20 


67.17 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 










28,414.75 


141 


201.52 




2,395.00 


9 


266.11 




20.00 


1 


20.00 


Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


5,245.82 


78 


67.25 


Educational institutions 


65,411.17 


519 


126.03 




2,070.66 


48 


43.14 




2,576.82 


46 


56.02 


Tutorial 


804.00 


22 


36.55 




5,349.57 


224 


23.88 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 










57,949.39 


309 


187.54 


Medical or physical restoration 


5,948.39 


68 


87.48 


Inter-current illness 








Placement 


540.07 


49 


ii !62 


Transportation 








Training 


9, 125.21 


344 


26.53 




1,336.87 


144 


9.28 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


3,800.36 


28 


135.73 


Equipment for Training Class 


210.95 






Miscellaneous (Other) 


410.65 


14 


29.33 



192 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



193 



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Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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196 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE 146 

Crippled Children's Program by County and Diagnostic Category: Distribution of 
Children Receiving Services of Maryland State Department of Health: 1953 



Diagnostic Category 



County 


Total 
Number 
of 
Chil- 
dren 


Cerebral 
Palsy 


Epi- 
lepsy 


Sight 
Conser- 
vation 


Speech- 
Hearing 


Ortho- 
pedic 


Plastic 


Cardiac 


Other 
Crip- 
pling 
Condi- 
tions 


Total State 


10, 129 


485 


557 


1,067 


3,657 


3,381 


297 


652 


33 


Baltimore City . . 


221 


65 






2 


128 


7 


13 


6 


Total Counties. . 


9,908 


420 


557 


1,067 


3,655 


3,253 


290 


639 


27 


Allegan v 


1,140 


78 


58 




67 


794 


73 


65 


5 


Anne Arundel.. 


958 


33 


63 


i 


348 


257 


23 


228 


5 


Baltimore 


491 


74 


55 


2 


307 


39 


4 


4 


6 


Calvert 


199 


2 


12 


81 


49 


47 


5 


2 


1 




176 


1 


5 


1 


114 


51 


2 


1 


1 


Carroll 


146 


11 


22 


1 


53 


44 


3 


12 




Cecil 


326 


11 


15 


62 


100 


94 


3 


41 




Charles 


421 


5 


34 


192 


116 


55 


5 


11 


3 


Dorchester. . . . 


155 


3 


30 




86 


30 


6 






Frederick 


405 


38 


31 




44 


235 


35 


21 


'i 




411 


11 


9 


1 


122 


252 


11 


4 


l 




599 


14 


13 




448 


114 


3 


6 


l 




231 


10 


4 


90 


88 


33 


4 


2 




Kent 


263 


3 


16 


124 


86 


32 


2 






Montgomery. . 


1,321 


34 


46 


375 


485 


171 


29 


isi 




Prince George's 


348 


39 


18 




161 


118 


5 


6 


l 


Queen Anne's.. 


109 


8 


6 




41 


48 


6 






St. Mary's .... 


437 


4 


23 


135 


78 


171 


6 


20 




Somerset 


195 


4 


5 


1 


75 


101 


7 


2 




Talbot 


57 




3 




40 


12 


2 






Washington . . . 


775 


30 


33 


1 


491 


190 


26 


2 


2 


Wicomico 


588 


6 


50 




188 


293 


21 


30 




Worcester 


157 


1 


6 




68 


72 


9 


1 





Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



TABLE 147 

Report of School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of the Maryland State 
Department of Health: Year Ending December 31, 1953 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time* 
Given to 
Given to 

Service 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Ex- 
amined by 
Dentist 


Treated 


Total 
Opera- 
tions 


Fillings 
Inserted 


Teeth 
Extracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 


Total 


50 




33,918 


5,279 


24,851 


13,479 


4,646 


3,355 


3,371 




1 


Full 


4,658 


855 


3,294 


359 


1,569 


274 


1,092 




2 


Part 


190 


81 


495 


257 


236 


1 


1 


Baltimore 


33 


Part 


18,487 


1,433 


9,071 


5,955 


970 


1,459 


687 


Calvert 


1 


Part 


90 


38 


126 


62 


23 




41 


Charles 


2 


•• 


1,857 


376 


1,548 


559 


618 


267 


104 


Frederick 


1 


Part 


631 


531 


1,064 


919 


90 


2 


53 


Harford 


8 


Part 


1,066 


102 


2,323 


1,111 


314 


251 


647 


Montgomery 


1 


Full 


4,736 


749 


2,775 


1,768 


488 


3 


516 


Washington 


1 


Full 


2,203 


1,114 


4,155 


2,489 


338 


1,098 


230 



* The scope of service varies, either full-time or part-time, meaning one or more one-day clinics per month. 
** One full-time dental hygienist and one part-time dental clinician. 



198 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



State of Maryland 
LIST OF FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL TABLES 
1952-53 



Financial Statements 199-204 

I Number of Public Schools 205 

II Total Number Different Public School Pupils 206-207 

III Catholic Parish and Private Schools : Enrollment and Teaching Staff . . 208-209 

IV Non-Catholic Nonpublic Schools: Enrollment and Teaching Staff 210-212 

V Summary: All Nonpublic Schools 213 

VI Average Number Belonging: Public Schools 214 

VII Average Daily Attendance: Public Schools 215 

VIII Aggregate Days of Attendance: Public Schools 216 

IX Average Days in Session; Per Cent of Attendance: Public Schools 217 

X Number of Teaching Positions: Public Schools 218-219 

XI-A Receipts from State of Maryland: Public Schools 220 

XI-B Receipts from Federal Government: Public Schools 221 

XII Receipts from All Sources: Public Schools 222 

XIII Total Disbursements: Public Schools 223 

XIV Disbursements for General Control 224 

XV Disbursements for Instruction; Operation 225 

XVI Disbursements for Maintenance; Auxiliary Agencies; Fixed Charges. . . 226 

XVII Disbursements for Debt Service; Capital Outlay 227 

XVIII Disbursements for White Elementary Public Schools 228 

XIX Disbursements for White High Public Schools 229 

XX Disbursements for Colored Elementary Public Schools 230 

XXI Disbursements for Colored High Public Schools 231 

XXII Cost, Enrollment, Attendance, Graduates, Courses: Individual Public 

High Schools 232-237 

XXIII Enrollment by Subject: Individual County Public High Schools 238-243 



Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



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200 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Source or Purpose Amount 



RECEIPTS 



Balance Forwarded from 1951-52 $ 18,401.80 

General Fund Appropriation 638, 835 .00 

Special Fund Budget Credit 104, 116.75 



Total Funds Available $761, 353 .55 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, and Special Payments $622, 812 .56 

General Repairs 675.20 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 1 , 799 . 37 

Light, Heat, Power, and Water 42.00 

Travel 32,413.36 

Transportation 705 . 47 

Communication 14,668.38 

Print ing Other than Office Supplies 3,453.12 

All Other Contractual Services 59.21 

Office Supplies 6,250.59 

Educational, Vocational, and Recreational Supplies 8,814.31 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 6 , 029 . 30 

Office Equipment 4 , 190 . 59 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 599.00 

Educational, Vocational, and Recreational Equipment 33.24 

All Other Equipment 10,210.00 

Rent 3,379.78 

Insurance 961.17 



Total Disbursements $717 , 096 . 65 

Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury $ 32,979.19 

Balance, June 30, 1953 $ 11,277.71 



Maryland State Department of Education 



201 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1953 



Source or Purpose 


Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppin 




R 


ECEIPT8 









Balance Forwarded from 1951-52 . 

General Fund Appropriation 

Student Fees 

Receipts to Budget Items 

Transfers by Budget Amendment . 

Total Funds Available 



$ 37,123.97 
759,069.00 
121,909.78 
56,248.26 



$974,351.01 



$ '803.28 
343, 106.00 
53,223.41 
33,719.92 
8,000.00 



$437,246.05 



$ 4,487.74 
303,508.00 
55,385.14 
18,394.79 



$381,775.67 



$ 8,813.83 
263,012.00 
63,701.23 
18,302.34 



$353,829.40 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries, Wages, Special Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light, Heat, Power, Water 

Travel 

Transportation 

Co mmunication 

Printing, Other than Office 

Supplies 

All Other Contractual Services. . . 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies . . 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies . 
Laundry, Cleaning, Disinfecting 

Supplies 

Refrigeration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, 

Recreational Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Materials 

Equipment Materials 

Highway Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory 

Equipment 

Agricultural and Botanical 

Equipment 

Motor Vehicles 

Educational, Vocational, 

Recreational Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Land 

Nonstructural Improvements 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Veterans' Clearing Account 

Prior Year Funds 

Refunds on Students' Fees 

Summer Session 



Total Disbursements . 



Unexpended Balance 

Returned to Treasury . . . 

Balance, June 30, 1953 



$674,459.84 
11,507.29 
780.77 
16,966.26 
2,382.81 
124.28 
5,534.30 

2,976.51 
963.37 
59,760.68 



16,693.76 
3,926.50 
479.06 

2,471.36 
46.00 

4,350.00 

477.67 
1,829.81 

499.95 

283.85 
4,307.48 

666.88 
6,781.98 



376.13 
10.88 



2,276.72 
2, 144.63 



853.76 
1,699.50 

13,874.49 
457.04 
79.40 



188.68 
875.00 
565.74 
33,467.99 
26,717.31 
2,243.00 
11,781.70 



$302,961.86 
5, 144.89 
1,132.03 
5,490.90 
1,344.34 
60.94 
1,753.99 

3,003.17 
2,848.22 
36,368.25 



$915,882.38 

$ 29,448.33 
$ 29,020.30 



5,586.40 
1,077.57 
233.96 

197.85 



3,528.20 

749.27 
966.03 
47.12 



2,594.09 
77.02 
952.79 



511.91 
3,336.07 



8.30 



6,650.03 
120.08 



6,553.65 
592.75 
35.00 
167.15 
260.00 
20,307.56 
6,575.77 
1,722.83 



$243,004.65 
6,095.33 
1, 129.38 
8,968.82 
1, 159.77 
25.00 
1,918.99 

552 . 14 
3,253.43 
34,825.62 



8,413.51 
908.61 
97.24 

1, 195.06 
41.20 

4,787.03 

309.00 
1,372.86 
25.73 



4,247.57 
40.55 
2,266.34 



32.34 

'56I66 
163.00 
1,016.70 

1,215.83 



264.64 
100.00 



4,368.39 



510.00 

10,278.52 
4,231.77 
792.50 



$422,959.99 $353,661.52 



$ 1,896.02 IS 14,494.47 
$ 12,390.04 $ 13,619.68 



$218,722.82 
4,425.37 
1,216.61 
8, 188.58 
250.87 
6.02 
1, 113.71 

496.24 
658.95 
48,070.35 
663.28 
8,628.92 
833.02 
423.48 

1,490.93 



2,239.35 

129.03 
2,012.21 
177.14 



2,253.96 
762^05 



16.57 
8.40 



979.56 
3,410.70 



3,816.98 

4,469.51 
74.75 
7.02 



488.61 

6, 726^49 
6,341.19 
140.00 
1,131.24 



$330,373.91 $127,197.96 

$ 14,214.74 $ 4,089.73 
$ 9,240.75 $ 4,489.00 



Deficit 



202 



Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



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Fixed 
Charges 
(Including 
Rent) 


1 3 £ q SSfe&S SKcSSSS S5SSSS S?2S 

— c§ **" SS § ! as e3 r? nr ~ 8 S 85 §i S 3 § 3 8 -5 ^ 

CcT r^-~ rO ci c7 000001004 IO t^cATl** Op t^«^00i-lO» — — 

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$7,568,048.17 

1,290,545.45 

0,277,502.72 

452,230.92 
392,521.51 
744,399.46 
143,604.18 
138,787.68 

209,059.75 
170,201.30 
170,200.98 
173,322.53 
281,993.96 

244,375.26 
301,973.40 
161,848.82 
9S.192.S6 
809,754.75 

597,490.35 
130,776.80 
148,911.00 
111,408.21 
106,247.85 

339,839.80 
195,350.28 
151.041.89 


Mainte- 
nance 


$4,203,010.37 

1,737,165.33 

2,465,845.04 

147,375.75 
147,814.72 
567,127.51 
20,024.60 
33,642.42 

30,596.97 
54,059.29 
27,349.93 
48,097.31 
48,786.71 

31,439.26 
81,831.02 
31,017.97 
20,185.51 
426,951.05 

446,021.65 
15,974.77 
34,S23,1I5 
38,570.14 
42,090.10 

76,517.54 
40.IIS9.21 
46,427.63 


Operation 


$7,137,617.14 

2,880,103.09 

4,257,514.05 

252,219.46 
322,441.50 
636,830.03 
43,227.94 
50,872.10 

104,024.17 
110,557.45 
105,014.79 
72,856.27 
148,203.33 

54,081.97 
170,754.10 
04.020.98 
42,759.39 
821,450.80 

737,093.30 
40,498.15 
57,030.83 
37.133.90 
40,352.95 

211,873.19 
73,089.21 
50,319.18 


Instruction 


$04,550,961.83 

23,840,882.82 

40,719,079.01 

2,445,994.84 
3,020,078.57 
7,400,005.03 
395,553.49 
575.035.40 

1,229,015.53 
962,676.99 
799,622.39 
74,035.06 

1,515,497.69 

661,073.38 
1,482,117.57 
731,586.03 
441,703.08 
6,650,820.00 

5,726,274.95 
462,177.17 
456,302.92 
531,309.73 
534,048.70 

2,380,214.51 
941,443.77 
013,141.95 


o O 


$2,555,731.97 

1,059,830.73 

1,495,901.24 

90,259.00 
127,098.72 
238,270.02 
24,854.17 
23,048.80 

39,407.84 
29,288.03 
34,820.85 
29,367.71 
45,004.25 

34,100.30 
59,640.78 
31,002.34 
20.105.01 
212,327.00 

180,752.76 
17,224.14 
24,718.00 
22,077.10 
20,101 .59 

107,778.13 
41,074.03 
29,104.83 


Total 
Current 
Disburse- 
ments 


$91,844,286.61 

33,011,067.13 

58,833,219.48 

3,431,726.65 
4,065,489.62 
9,759,543.22 
030,502.05 
831,512.02 

1,640,166.82 
1,345,877.71 
1,153,570.77 
1,094, 098.5(5 
2,001,918.30 

1,031,500.11 
2,112,049.01 
1,042,753.70 
636,083.01 
8,929,583.30 

7,765,831.88 
678,802.08 
730,909.79 
746,194.07 
752,711.53 

3,160,086.63 
1,321,929.02 
906,432.88 


Tuition 
to Ad- 
joining 
Cities, 
Counties 
and States 


$72,558.83 

72,558.83 

20.00 
111.00 

590.26 

205.00 

476.30 

14.00 
680.00 
4,315.00 

23,959.96 
653.16 
3,073.50 
110.00 
21,070.65 

775.00 
1,240.00 

930.00 

20.00 
13,330.00 
85.00 


Capital 
Outlay 


$43,516,284.22 

6,819,028.40 

36,697,255.82 

1,097,540.44 
2,930,686.27 
8,462,702.64 

339,680.85 
87,350.32 

211,800.94 
617,649.20 
761,003.20 
1,367,466.49 
655,748.50 

677,017.65 
1,765,138.69 
200,532.30 
391,001.00 
7,405,808.39 

5,040,835.10 
100,850.93 
488,077.54 
435,461.36 
879,50)0.82 

031,200.89 
1,093,683.17 
959,394.35 


Debt 
Service 


$0,850,292.81 

1.810,739.71 

8,039,553.07 

347,970.00 
742,031.25 
1,468,747.72 
133,400.22 
50,558.79 

120,000.00 
102,550.00 
108,039.90 
141,190.83 
139,391.1)4 

111,000.01) 

336,742.45 
106,829.40 
07,141.46 
1,685,969.66 

1,688,200.16 
68,768.36 
45,404.52 
109,614.17 
101,084.48 

91,437.50 
152,497.50 
90,275.00 


Total 
Disburse- 
ments 


$145,283,422.47 

41,640,835.27 

103,042,587.20 

4,877,257.09 
7,738,318.14 
19,081,583.84 
1,109,658.12 
969,632.13 

1,972,510.06 
2,066,076.91 
2,023,587.99 
2,004,035.88 
2,801,373.50 

1,843,477.72 
4,215,483.31 
1,443,188.99 
1,124,996.13 
18,043,392.00 

14,501,651.14 
858,667.37 
1,265,381.85 
1,292,199.60 
1,733,956.83 

3,882,745.02 
2,581,440.29 
1.956,187.23 


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$12,200,779.27 

568,538.66 
1,417,412.13 
1,869,515.15 
80,000.00 

105',024.95 

36,291.65 
239,187.10 
290,000.10 
900.50 

205,911.11 
480,179.17 
30,128.57 
S9.S95.30 
2,042,924.08 

2,007,590.72 
13,389.09 
291,168.17 
147,240.79 
302,942.93 

268,578.67 
503,974.72 
3,312.93 


II 

a § 


t 

$2,675,415.89 

63,302.27 
119,941.09 
1,536,621.33 
10,551.44 
18,725.10 

104,204.80 
05,294.93 
79,329.18 
1,252.05 
45,851 .38 

2,578.38 
573.05 
21,882.98 
26,540.62 
110,770.66 

158,103.01 
13,527.45 

31,061.36 
t20.790.57 
"(2,203.20) 

50,434.92 
127,540.51 
2,080.21 


Grand 
Total 


* 

$160,159,617.63 

41,640,835.27 

118,518,782.36 

5,509,098.02 
9,275,071.30 
23.087,720.32 
1 ,200,209.66 
1,093,382,18 

2,136,774.92 
2,167,663.49 
2,342,104.33 
2,001,801.03 
2,908,191.50 

2,051,967.21 
4,696,236.13 
1,495,200.54 
1,241,432.11 
20,797,087.34 

17,767,345.47 
885,583.91 
1,587,611.38 
1,460,230.96 
2,034,698.50 

4,207,758.61 
3,212,955.52 
1,962,180.37 


>> 

H 
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P 
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Total State. .. 

Balto. City... 

Total Counties 

Allegany — 
An. Arundel 
Baltimore.. . 
Calvert 
Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 
Dorchester. 
Frederick. . . 

Garrett 
Harford 
Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Pr. George's 

Qu. Anne's. 
St. Mary's. . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico. . . 
Worcester.. . 



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238 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland County 





County 
Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


Allegany 


3,742 


3,592 


396 


292 


3,346 


3,298 


3,061 


2,953 


3,166 


2,765 


2,882 


2,494 


204 


368 


2 


Oldtown Sr.-Jr 


96 


124 


18 


23 


78 


101 


78 


101 


93 


113 


89 


113 






3 


Fliatstone Sr.-Jr 


137 


114 


29 


21 


108 


93 


108 


93 


104 


88 


93 


88 






4 


Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 


963 


947 






963 


947 


825 


785 


866 


720 


768 


612 


47 


103 


5 


Allegany Sr.-Jr 


751 


757 


20 


16 


731 


740 


676 


646 


579 


584 


513 


478 


44 


81 


6 


Bruce Sr.-Jr 


324 


323 


35 


25 


289 


298 


293 


306 


281 


243 


237 


178 


28 


29 


7 


Barton Sr.-Jr 


110 


93 


46 


35 


64 


58 


64 


58 


104 


65 


97 


70 






8 


Central Sr.-Jr 


268 


255 


47 


34 


221 


22] 


212 


201 


217 


181 


209 


190 


26 


47 


9 


Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 


239 


213 


41 


26 


198 


186 


179 


169 


205 


148 


182 


186 


18 


35 


10 


Beall Sr.-Jr 


509 


455 


21 


4 


488 


451 


422 


392 


399 


315 


376 


294 


41 


73 


11 


Cresaptown Jr 


107 


103 


39 


32 


68 


71 


68 


71 


107 


103 


107 


103 






12 


Penn. Ave. Elm.-Jr 


89 


73 


89 


73 










89 


73 


89 


73 






13 


Beall Elem.-Jr 


89 


81 


11 


3 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 






14 


Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 


60 


54 






60 


54 


58 


53 


44 


54 


44 


31 






15 


Anne Arundel 


4,022 


4,154 


2,447 


2,352 


1,575 


1,802 


1,363 


1,610 


2,418 


2,404 


3,203 


3, 145 


97 


146 


16 




530 


569 




530 


569 


492 


514 


412 


300 


310 


293 


27 


45 


17 


Annapolis Sr.-Jr 


464 


595 






464 


595 


446 


592 


280 


331 


350 


373 


57 


90 


18 


Southern Sr.-Jr 


196 


175 






196 


175 


169 


164 


160 


151 


165 


138 






19 


Arundel Sr.-Jr 


488 


486 


358 


303 


130 


183 


129 


179 


279 


305 


416 


398 






20 


George Fox Jr 


410 


394 


410 


394 










238 


246 


410 


394 






21 


Brooklyn Park Jr 


219 


214 


219 


214 














219 


214 






22 


Glen Burnie Jr 


508 


476 


508 


476 










508 


476 


508 


476 






23 


Annapolis Jr 


435 


370 


435 


370 










227 


173 


227 


173 






24 


Bates Colored Sr.-Jr 


772 


875 


517 


595 


255 


280 


127 


161 


314 


422 


598 


686 


13 


11 


25 


Baltimore 


9,097 


9,343 


6,190 


5,921 


2,891 


3,411 


2,846 


3,363 


8,324 


7,784 


7,951 


7, 136 


303 


416 


26 


Catonsville Sr.-Jr 


1,042 


1,027 


624 


569 


402 


447 


400 


447 


973 


839 


895 


728 


63 


86 


27 


Milford Mill Sr.-Jr 


693 


754 


449 


476 


244 


278 


239 


275 


634 


624 


611 


594 


35 


32 


28 


Franklin Sr.-Jr 


327 


369 


201 


219 


126 


150 


122 


150 


274 


273 


288 


325 


9 


17 


29 


Sparks Sr.-Jr 


179 


202 


61 


48 


118 


154 


118 


154 


174 


152 


95 


103 






30 


Towson Sr.-Jr 


798 


932 


196 


223 


602 


709 


571 


665 


548 


492 


594 


507 


94 


152 


31 


Dundalk Sr.-Jr 


997 


997 


630 


573 


367 


424 


366 


424 


925 


814 


869 


664 


51 


30 


32 


Kenwood Sr.-Jr 


775 


892 


102 


136 


673 


756 


671 


753 


597 


593 


416 


340 


51 


99 


33 


Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 


478 


497 


291 


244 


187 


253 


187 


253 


413 


355 


393 


278 






34 


Fifth District Jr 


64 


66 


64 


66 










64 


66 


64 


66 






35 


Sixth District Jr 


54 


66 


54 


66 










54 


66 


54 


66 






36 


Seventh District Jr 


76 


72 


76 


72 










76 


72 


76 


72 






37 


Towson Jr. . . 


493 


521 


493 


521 










493 


521 


493 


521 






38 


Carroll Manor Jr 


116 


118 


116 


118 










116 


118 


116 


118 






39 


Parkville Jr 


605 


574 


605 


574 










605 


574 


605 


574 






40 


Stcmmers Run Jr. 


1,138 


993 


1,138 


993 










1,138 


993 


1,138 


993 






41 


10 Elem. Schools with Jr. 7th 


524 


505 


524 


505 










524 


505 


524 


505 






42 


Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr 


112 


105 


80 


67 


32 


38 


32 


38 


112 


105 


88 


78 






43 


Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 


191 


198 


151 


122 


40 


76 


40 


78 


191 


198 


181 


166 






44 


Sollers Point Colored Sr.-Jr 


410 


440 


310 


314 


100 


126 


100 


126 


388 


409 


426 


423 






45 


Bragg Colored Elem.-Jr. 


25 


15 


25 


15 










25 


15 


25 


15 






46 


Calvert 


566 


515 


123 


123 


443 


392 


426 


379 


474 


431 


449 


422 


16 


33 


47 


Calvert County Sr.-Jr 


349 


274 






349 


274 


349 


274 


288 


221 


276 


218 


16 


33 


48 


Brooks Colored Sr.-Jr. 


217 


241 


123 


123 


94 


118 


77 


105 


186 


210 


173 


204 






49 


Caroline 


823 


751 


359 


303 


464 


448 


473 


461 


729 


631 


679 


613 


15 


27 


50 


Greensboro Sr.-Jr.. . 


158 


156 


68 


60 


90 


96 


90 


96 


152 


132 


117 


153 




• • 
13 


51 


Caroline Sr -Jr 


185 


154 


74 


54 


111 


100 


120 


113 


162 


124 


134 


95 


5 


52 


Preston Sr.-Jr. 


85 


65 


31 


29 


54 


36 


54 


36 


64 


49 


85 


65 


3 





53 


Federalsburg Sr.-Jr. 


166 


148 


77 


67 


89 


81 


89 


81 


133 


120 


135 


107 


7 


8 


54 


Ridgely Sr -Jr 


52 


47 


15 


20 


37 


27 


37 


27 


52 


47 


51 


47 






55 


Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr 


177 


181 


94 


73 


83 


108 


83 


108 


166 


159 


157 


146 






56 


Carroll 


1,723 


1,763 






1,722 


1,763 


1,710 


1,733 


1,537 


1,491 


1,367 


1,244 


32 


fti 

01 


57 


Taneytown Sr -Jr 


165 


168 






165 


168 


156 


147 


141 


134 


135 


127 


12 


13 


58 


Sykesville Sr.-Jr. 


202 


202 






202 


202 


202 


202 


190 


170 


192 


130 






59 


Manchester Sr -Jr 


166 


182 






166 


182 


166 


182 


163 


166 


127 


141 




AO 

48 


60 


Westminster Sr.-Jr 


562 


568 






562 


568 


560 


568 


470 


453 


414 


375 


20 


61 


Hampstead Sr.-Jr 


130 


111 






129 


111 


128 


102 


128 


94 


104 


72 






62 


New Windsor Sr -Jr 


92 


113 






92 


113 


92 


113 


92 


98 


67 


83 






63 


Elmer Wolfe Sr -Jr. 


94 


104 






94 


104 


94 


104 


87 


92 


69 


69 






64 


Mount Airy Sr -Jr 


18( 


177 






18( 


1 77 
III 




1 77 
III 


134 


146 


127 


109 






65 


Charles Carroll Jr 


45 


45 






45 


45 


45 


45 


45 


45 


45 


45 






66 


Moton Colored Sr -Jr 


75 


75 






75 


75 


75 


75 


75 


75 


75 


75 






67 


Johnsville Colored Elem -Jr 


12 


18 






12 


18 


12 


18 


12 


18 


12 


18 






DO 


Cecil 


1,335 


1,332 


422 


409 


910 


923 


968 


958 


1,111 


1,015 


1,187 


1,109 


8 


6 


69 


Hemlfnti Sr -Tr 


92 


82 


41 


28 


51 


54 


51 


54 


50 


50 


92 


82 






70 


Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 


85 


92 






85 


92 


85 


92 


69 


72 


76 


68 






71 


Elkton Sr.-Jr 


403 


339 


85 


63 


315 


276 


316 


271 


353 


256 


352 


265 


8 


6 


72 


North East Sr.-Jr 


226 


255 


104 


112 


122 


143 


122 


132 


209 


223 


200 


222 






73 




20S 


242 


114 


135 


89 


107 


134 


149 


123 


127 


160 


183 






74 




163 


141 






163 


141 


162 


141 


158 


120 


144 


108 






75 




41 


34 


3C 


22 


11 


12 


11 


12 


41 


34 


41 


34 






76 
77 


Calvert Jr 


33 
8£ 


37 
110 


27 
21 


24 

25 


e 

68 


13 

85 


19 
68 


22 
85 


33 
75 


37 
96 


33 
89 


37 






Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 


110 


:: 



Maryland State Department of Education 239 



Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



French 


Spanish 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 


Home 
Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen 


Voc. 


Arts 


J 

Edu 


Gen. 


I 

Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


55 


99 


63 


59 


146 


77 


1,857 




202 




1,64C 


465 


757 


1,178 


2,724 


2,447 


2,605 


2,585 


1,271 


1,211 


2 










74 












54 


47 






96 


124 


71 


118 






3 












77 


31 








41 


52 






121 


107 


77 


10C 


. 




4 






38 


i3 


26 




411 




82 




375 


99 


19C 


475 


65C 


579 


746 


584 


538 


528 


5 


27 


30 


25 


46 


15 




364 








352 


37 


214 


241 


546 


530 


483 


497 


314 


290 


6 


10 


22 










133 




51 




108 


88 


61 


134 


236 


220 


248 


256 






7 














104 








65 




28 


33 


104 


60 


106 


93 






8 


5 


16 










175 








166 




85 


78 


229 


201 


169 


230 






9 


1 


1 










201 








123 


27 


32 


49 


202 


150 


124 


122 


133 


99 


10 


12 


30 






31 




286 




69 




233 


92 


147 


168 


240 


208 


244 


278 


212 


216 


11 














107 








103 








107 


103 


107 


103 






12 






























89 


73 


89 


73 






13 






























89 


81 


89 


81 


78 


78 


14 














45 








20 


23 






15 


11 


49 


47 






15 


191 


203 


33 


114 


88 


69 


2,942 




338 


5 


3,095 




237 


812 


3,675 


3,600 


2,806 


2,963 


2,358 


2,087 


16 


62 


61 


61 








196 




214 




190 




45 


246 


345 


200 


59 


239 


51 


74 


17 


57 


71 


19 


36 






299 








321 




85 


341 


437 


556 


134 


197 


100 


148 


18 


13 


13 






32 


22 


121 








130 




37 


39 


196 


175 


126 


129 


6 


19 


19 


32 


33 






17 


27 


388 








370 




58 


88 


477 


456 


334 


281 


312 


266 


20 














410 








394 








410 


394 


410 


394 


410 


394 


21 














219 








214 








219 


214 


219 


214 


219 


214 


22 














508 








476 








508 


476 


506 


473 


498 


472 


23 














435 








370 








435 


370 


435 


370 


435 


370 


24 


27 


25 


14 


78 


39 


20 


366 




124 


'5 


630 




12 


98 


648 


759 


583 


666 


327 


130 


25 


278 


329 


262 


224 


62 


98 


5,400 


5 


135 


89 


4,925 




860 


2,324 


8,934 


9,168 


6,821 


6,778 


5,795 


5,497 


26 


9 


26 


35 


25 






760 








677 




183 


329 1,010 


990 


719 


680 


698 


618 


27 


21 


48 


42 


15 






385 


i 






385 




51 


189 


693 


754 


485 


521 


369 


362 


28 


7 


16 






62 


45 


210 








204 




48 


105 


326 


365 


232 


267 


159 


190 


29 


g 


17 








53 


66 






63 






35 


111 


179 


202 


69 


93 


61 


48 


30 


81 


84 


122 


ii<j 






431 


3 


46 


18 


624 




194 


425 


73*'' 


897 


259 


323 


245 


308 


31 


52 


36 










611 






4 


602 




182 




MS 7 


968 


682 


544 


730 


605 


32 


53 


59 


63 


65 






477 


1 


71 




256 




115 


542 


739 


866 


271 


446 


157 


184 


33 


28 


21 










401 








308 




50 


220 


471 


467 


318 


323 


149 


152 


34 












4 


43 








42 








64 


66 


64 


66 


38 


39 


35 














40 








43 








54 


66 


54 


66 


33 


42 


36 














46 








39 








76 


72 


76 


72 


76 


72 


37 














303 








281 








493 


521 


493 


521 


259 


277 


38 














65 








61 








116 


118 


116 


118 


65 


61 


39 














379 








369 








590 


567 


605 


574 


605 


574 


40 














703 








625 








1,138 


993 


1,138 


993 


1, 138 


993 


41 






























524 


505 


524 


505 


524 


505 


42 














90 






3 


83 








112 


103 


104 


95 


100 


76 


43 














135 








148 








191 


193 


181 


177 


167 


165 


44 


19 


22 










255 




18 


1 


178 




2 


71 


410 


440 


406 


379 


197 


211 


45 






























25 


15 


25 


15 


25 


15 


46 


13 


26 






89 


45 


359 








320 


73 


59 


71 


430 


374 


402 


351 






47 


7 


11 






70 




232 








159 


29 


54 


67 


232 


159 


232 


159 






48 


6 


15 






19 


45 


127 








161 


44 


5 


4 


198 


215 


170 


192 






49 


18 


25 






24 


144 


520 








417 


108 


135 


164 


81 


734 


502 


571 


77 


68 


50 


6 


6 










134 








110 




54 


93 


155 


152 


94 


154 






51 


12 


19 








49 


117 








89 




42 


34 


182 


147 


93 


85 






52 












52 


17 








51 








84 


65 


31 


29 


14 


ii 


53 














150 








101 




39 


37 


162 


147 


107 


122 






54 










24 




21 








31 








51 


47 






'7 


16 


55 












43 


81 








35 


108 






177 


176 


177 


181 


56 


38 


56 


61 


94 






26 


62 


1,477 




57 




1,323 


61 


396 


619 


1,661 


1,677 


1,345 


1.46") 


61 


96 


57 












18 


165 








Hi') 




40 


52 


162 


152 


110 


102 






58 


15 


16 










176 








164 




50 


70 


202 


202 


l.">4 


161 






59 


7 


11 










148 








14!) 


47 


47 


47 


164 


1>2 


128 


153 






60 


23 


36 










440 




57 




381 




108 


191 


507 


512 


403 


420 


24 


57 


61 


11 


8 










99 








69 


20 


50 


103 


129 


109 


88 


81 


25 


21 


62 


3 


6 










91 








103 




28 


45 


92 


113 


92 


113 






63 
64 












18 


79 








91 




31 


37 


94 


102 


91 


119 






2 


17 






26 


26 


159 








107 


i5 


42 


74 


179 


167 


147 


172 






65 














45 








45 








45 


45 


45 


45 






66 














75 








49 


26 






75 


75 


75 


75 






67 






























12 


18 


12 


18 


12 


18 


68 


10 


9 


50 


52 


22 


40 


872 


37 




33 


931 


39 


157 


368 


1,161 


965 


800 


838 


308 


215 


69 


1 


4 










92 








62 




2 


28 


89 


58 










70 














79 








68 




4 


33 


84 


20 










71 






17 


21 






101 








207 




84 


133 


329 


214 


278 


243 


193 




72 






14 


14 






189 








184 




25 


55 


224 


252 


218 


250 


158 


181 


73 






19 


17 


22 


40 


117 








182 




30 


76 


197 


188 


69 


136 






74 


*9 


'5 










148 








120 




12 


43 


108 


89 


114 


90 






75 














24 
















41 


34 


27 


11 


17 


34 


76 














33 


37 




33 


37 












33 


37 






77 














89 








71 


39 






89 


110 


61 1 


71 







240 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates : Each Maryland 



County 
Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


Charles 


1.011 


1,087 


417 


441 


594 


645 


579 


647 


817 


878 


898 


819 


41 


21 


2 


La Plata Sr.-Jr 


293 


281 


120 


109 


173 


171 


177 


173 


218 


169 


237 


157 


41 


21 


3 


Lackey Sr.-Jr 


214 


232 






214 


232 


214 


232 


194 


186 


206 


177 






4 


Nanjemoy Jr 


38 


28 


38 


28 










38 


28 


38 


28 






5 


Glasva Jr 


51 


37 






51 


37 


51 


37 


51 


37 


51 


37 






g 




58 


47 






58 


47 


58 


47 


58 


47 


58 


47 






7 


Bel Alton Colored Sr.-Jr 


160 


238 


iii 


157 


49 


81 


49 


81 


100 


199 


130 


182 






8 


Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr 


197 


224 


148 


147 


49 


77 


30 


77 


158 


212 


178 


191 






g 


Dorchester 


999 


929 


185 


170 


814 


759 


734 


671 


873 


821 


749 


674 


28 


41 


10 




45 


30 


7 


6 


38 


24 


38 


24 


37 


26 


43 


24 






11 


Vienna Sr.-Jr 


50 


40 


13 


8 


37 


32 


37 


32 


40 


33 


32 


29 






12 


Crapo Sr.-Jr 


44 


52 


24 


23 


20 


29 


20 


29 


44 


52 


38 


41 






13 


Hoopers Island Sr.-Jr 


19 


18 






19 


18 


19 


18 


19 


18 


19 


18 






14 


Cambridge Sr.-Jr 


269 


290 






269 


290 


197 


220 


221 


221 


165 


136 


28 


41 


15 


Hurlock Sr.-Jr 


144 


119 


76 


57 


68 


62 


66 


61 


118 


91 


100 


85 






16 


Cambridge Jr 


197 


157 






197 


157 


197 


157 


197 


157 


197 


157 






17 


Mace's Lane Colored Sr -Jr 


231 


223 


65 


76 


166 


147 


160 


130 


197 


223 


155 


184 






18 


Frederick 


2,337 


2,267 


1,332 


1,252 


1,005 


1,015 


958 


949 


1,194 


1,121 


1.689 


1,549 


114 


220 


19 


Frederick Sr.-Jr 


673 


672 


227 


218 


446 


454 


457 


437 


484 


519 


375 


328 


80 


146 


20 


Middletown Sr.-Jr 


276 


278 


169 


161 


107 


117 


66 


112 


153 


134 


174 


178 


11 


35 


21 


Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 


98 


78 


55 


38 


43 


40 


43 


40 


52 


47 


73 


63 


13 


18 


22 


Thurmont Sr.-Jr 


263 


256 


169 


151 


94 


105 


75 


69 


128 


97 


179 


170 


10 


21 


23 


Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


195 


202 


106 


116 


89 


86 


91 


78 


120 


79 


96 


85 






24 


Walkersville Sr -Jr 


152 


152 


60 


56 


92 


96 


92 


96 


82 


93 


149 


143 






25 


Elm Street Jr 


416 


388 


416 


388 














416 


388 






26 




86 


70 


57 


48 


29 


22 


29 


22 


29 


22 


86 


70 






27 


Lincoln Colored Sr.-Jr 


178 


171 


73 


76 


105 


95 


105 


95 


146 


130 


141 


124 






28 




871 


881 


870 


877 






2 


12 


406 


363 


659 


617 


15 


55 




1\ UriiicI 11 vJdllcLL v, U. OI.-Jl 


391 


375 


390 


375 










164 


148 


297 


258 


2 


14 


30 


Southern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr 


480 


506 


480 


502 






2 


12 


242 


215 


362 


359 


13 


41 


31 


Harford 


2,010 


1,983 


1,276 


1,233 


734 


749 


603 


664 


893 


860 


1,713 


1,552 


71 


83 


32 


Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 


294 


276 


184 


167 


110 


109 


92 


83 


121 


98 


224 


193 


18 


15 


33 


Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


S3S 


784 


535 


492 


303 


292 


209 


282 


349 


324 


790 


652 


34 


33 


34 


North Harford Sr.-Jr 


3*0 


432 


247 


278 


133 


153 


122 


126 


137 


169 


29s 


314 


8 


19 


35 


Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 


245 


261 


155 


158 


90 


103 


82 


81 


100 


98 


ISO 


190 


11 


16 


36 


Central Colored Sr.-Jr 


158 


139 


100 


88 


58 


51 


58 


51 


91 


80 


158 


139 






37 


Havre de Grace Col. Sr.-Jr 


95 


91 


55 


50 


40 


41 


40 


41 


95 


91 


63 


64 






38 


Howard 


936 


935 


609 


600 


326 


335 


258 


279 


774 


768 


756 


678 


39 


41 


39 


Howard Co. Sr 


218 


220 






218 


220 


167 


164 


138 


103 


102 


44 


39 


41 


40 


Lisbon Sr.-Jr 


149 


145 


102 


103 


47 


42 


47 


42 


124 


127 


129 


119 






41 


Elkridge Jr 


146 


151 


146 


151 










146 


151 


146 


151 






42 


Ellicott Citv Jr 


129 


146 


129 


146 










129 


146 


129 


146 






43 


Clar^sville Jr 


98 


85 


98 


85 










98 


85 


98 


S5 






44 


Harriet Tubman Col. Sr.-Jr 


196 


188 


134 


115 


6l 


73 


44 


73 


139 


156 


152 


133 






45 




554 


520 


297 


264 


257 


256 


259 


264 


432 


411 


448 


416 


21 


32 


46 


Galena Sr.-Jr 


85 


73 


55 


40 


30 


33 


30 


33 


78 


69 


69 


62 


1 


7 


47 




222 


214 


145 


126 


77 


88 


78 


97 


117 


116 


170 


146 


17 


17 


4^ 
49 


Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 


94 


77 






94 


77 


94 


77 


84 


70 


71 


58 


3 


8 




153 


156 


97 


98 


56 


58 


57 


57 


153 


156 


138 


150 






50 




5.756 


5,773 


2,090 


1,995 


3,657 


3,771 


3.332 


3,434 


3,522 


3,337 


5,129 


4,265 


336 


539 


51 


Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr 


713 


758 




712 


758 


567 


584 


529 


456 


644 


405 


88 


130 


52 




893 


832 






888 


831 


631 


599 


692 


480 


619 


294 


78 


117 


53 


Poolesville Sr.-Jr 


122 


130 


62 


66 


60 


64 


68 


87 


81 


68 


106 


101 


33 




54 


Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr 


494 


454 


250 


170 


242 


284 


330 


326 


270 


285 


421 


253 


44 


55 


Sherwood Sr.-Jr 


242 


254 


105 


125 


137 


129 


152 


161 


162 


161 


203 


189 






56 


Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr 


336 


346 






335 


342 


310 


314 


174 


201 


238 


192 






57 


Damascus Sr.-Jr 


158 


142 


105 


96 


53 


46 


91 


73 


91 


93 


114 


102 






58 


Leland Jr 


536 


603 


536 


603 










310 


335 


536 


602 


ii 


75 


59 


Western Jr 


320 


307 


320 


307 










150 


12b 


320 


307 


23 


43 


60 


Takoma Park Jr 


385 


372 






385 


37l 


385 


371 


239 


212 


385 


372 


22 


32 


61 


Montgomerv Hills Jr 


386 


390 






386 


390 


385 


390 


199 


210 


385 


390 


20 


52 


62 


Kensington Jr 


321 


307 


224 


221 


97 


86 


97 


86 


189 


165 


321 


307 


11 


19 


63 


Eastern Jr 


488 


4(17 


488 


407 










278 


231 


488 


407 


20 


27 


64 


Carver Colored Sr 


136 


162 






136 


161 


90 


134 


32 


120 


123 


35 






65 


Lincoln Colored Jr 


226 


3i (9 






226 


309 


226 


309 


126 


192 


226 


309 







Maryland State Department of Education 241 



County Public High School: Year Ending June 30, 1953 



French 


Spanish 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 


Home 
Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


* 

Gen. 


* 

Voc. 


Arts 


° t 
Edu. 

B 


Gen. 


a 

Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


35 


24 






31 


144 


480 








445 


87 


111 


315 


977 


1,017 


755 


823 


233 


264 


2 












57 


164 








US 


10 


56 


148 


293 


280 


165 


] 5k 






3 


27 


g 










92 








98 




23 


81 


195 


178 


208 


232 


114 


104 


4 














38 
















38 


28 










5 






















37 








51 


37 


51 


37 






6 






















47 








58 


47 


58 


47 






7 










31 


33 


84 








52 


36 


24 


44 


145 


223 


145 


224 


46 


105 


8 


8 


16 








54 


102 








92 


41 


8 


42 


197 


224 


124 


125 


73 


55 


Q 

y 


26 


47 






20 


98 


392 




21 




418 


51 


190 


214 


927 


860 


586 


549 


340 


328 


10 


3 


9 








22 










23 








44 


28 










11 


6 


6 






20 


14 


















49 


40 










12 






























44 


46 










13 










































14 














134 




21 




158 




139 


158 


218 


247 


129 


131 


143 


171 


15 


6 


17 








28 


132 








91 




32 


36 


144 


119 


107 


110 






16 






























197 


157 


197 


157 


197 


157 


1 7 


11 


15 








34 


126 








146 


51 


19 


20 


231 


223 


153 


151 






18 


53 


120 






55 


291 


1,301 






16 


1,197 


78 


460 


646 


2,292 


2,189 


1,664 


1,652 


970 


1,043 


19 


25 


53 






55 


94 


325 








352 




248 


336 


659 


644 


251 


232 


260 


228 


20 


4 


18 








84 


113 








12 


37 


55 


79 


274 


269 


153 


204 


59 


144 


21 












41 


75 








78 








98 


78 


98 


78 






22 


12 


17 








28 


171 








151 




52 


no 


262 


244 


211 


211 


172 


164 


23 


7 


14 










138 








127 




76 


8C 


169 


174 


135 


159 






24 


O 


18 








44 


44 






16 


114 






20 


15C 


152 


13C 


139 


40 


96 


25 














194 








186 








416 


388 


41C 


388 


416 


388 


26 














86 








70 








86 


70 


86 


70 






27 














155 








107 


41 


20 


21 


178 


170 


178 


171 


23 


23 


28 


4 


10 


13 


15 


29 


145 


531 








373 


188 


127 


316 


688 


572 


60C 


653 


95 


75 


9Q 


4 


1C 








102 


268 








154 


117 


33 


97 


303 


218 


29€ 


301 






30 






13 


15 


29 


43 


263 








219 


71 


94 


219 


385 


354 


304 


352 


95 


75 


31 


62 


82 








202 


1,358 


2 


29 


38 


1,224 


144 


228 


594 


1,872 


1,747 


1,580 


1,634 


1,059 


1,018 


32 


7 


7 










152 








126 


14 


75 


82 


279 


260 


203 


199 


83 


72 


33 


29 


42 








63 


712 


2 






585 


33 


49 


283 


750 


636 


65S 


630 


532 


516 


34 


21 


22 








139 


150 








243 




29 


128 


372 


393 


29E 


373 


222 


211 


35 


. 5 


11 










125 








124 


46 


60 


94 


218 


228 


166 


202 


162 


167 


36 














124 








55 


51 






158 


139 


158 


139 


34 


33 


37 














95 








91 




15 


7 


95 


91 


95 


91 


26 


19 


38 


32 


20 








127 


634 








687 




191 


278 


887 




726 


M4 


168 


123 


39 
40 


9 


6 








29 


109 








84 




129 


186 


170 


114 


50 


136 


68 


80 


6 


5 








39 


56 








119 




22 


148 


144 


129 


135 


46 






41 














146 








151 








146 


151 


146 


151 






42 














129 








146 








129 


146 


129 


146 






43 














98 








85 








98 


85 


98 


85 






44 


17 


9 








59 


96 








102 




40 


64 


196 


188 


174 


161 


54 


43 


45 






4 


13 




96 


395 








280 


86 


84 


129 


548 


514 


424 


496 


97 


93 


46 














77 








40 


18 


19 


18 


85 


73 


62 


61 


55 


40 


47 






4 


13 




53 


132 








92 




28 


77 


216 


208 


157 


220 


42 


53 


48 














79 








50 


io 


37 


34 


94 




66 


67 






49 












43 


107 








98 


58 






153 


156 


139 


148 






50 


144 


290 


386 


381 


98 


120 


4,147 


258 


438 




3,418 


220 


666 


1,423 


5,056 


4,802 


2,941 


3,482 


1,968 


2,330 


51 


59 


138 


166 


187 






398 


63 


37 




142 


49 


214 


293 


597 


598 


144 


240 


33 


109 


52 


53 


77 


189 


161 






553 


74 


146 




260 


40 


183 


504 


546 


268 


128 


222 


78 


182 


53 


4 


9 






30 


40 


41 








76 


23 


18 


35 


117 


120 


58 


100 






54 






io 


9 






320 


9 


126 




264 


22 


36 


169 


458 


382 


322 


332 


265 


191 


55 


ii 


31 


5 


7 


42 




142 


75 






72 


24 


57 


74 


225 


230 


127 


203 


118 


152 


56 


7 


7 


16 


17 




3i 


268 


15 






208 




121 


181 


334 


331 


214 


228 


126 


202 


57 


4 


6 








49 


83 








77 


13 


30 


49 


153 


140 


70 


78 


105 


96 


58 














421 








505 








525 


603 


476 


561 


15 


40 


59 














300 








290 








315 


306 


265 


271 


261 


257 


60 














368 








340 








373 


371 


230 


2>s 


138 


170 


61 














382 








365 








3M 


385 


135 


256 


195 


258 


62 














266 








251 








315 


305 


275 


248 


216 


226 


63 














443 








370 








488 


407 


36S 


320 


3>3 


338 


64 


6 


22 






26 




10 




129 




11 


49 


7 


118 


73 


135 


53 


39 


2 


39 


65 














152 


22 






187 








153 


221 


76 


96 


33 


70 



242 Eighty-Seventh Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland 



County 
Name of High School 


Total 
Enroll- 
ment 


Core 


English 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Mathe- 
matics 


Latin 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 


Prince George's 


7,374 


7,323 


4,892 


4,715 


2,472 


2,607 


2,145 


2,359 


3,460 


3,036 


6,086 


5,189 


271 


226 


2 


Bladensburg Sr 


847 


677 


157 


134 


690 


543 


498 


459 


700 


462 


396 


234 


42 


54 


3 


Northwestern Sr 


818 


941 






811 


941 


692 


845 


567 


466 


587 


263 


176 


125 


4 


Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr 


233 


254 


166 


195 


67 


59 


64 


54 


124 


119 


175 


162 


3 


5 


5 


Suitland Sr.-Jr 


799 


830 


376 


358 


421 


471 


408 


461 


399 


328 


632 


474 


35 


27 


6 


Surrattsville Sr -Jr 


223 


202 


147 


122 


76 


80 


75 


64 


107 


71 


201 


154 






7 


Laurel Sr.-Jr 


285 


285 


181 


170 


104 


115 


103 


114 


267 


229 


248 


208 






8 


Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr 


225 


223 


145 


123 


79 


100 


76 


75 


113 


97 


187 


159 






9 


Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 


396 


383 


258 


222 


138 


161 


138 


157 


173 


148 


333 


267 


15 


is 


10 




646 


557 


646 


557 










101 


94 


646 


557 






11 


Hyattsville Jr 


548 


540 


548 


540 










169 


171 


548 


540 






12 


Mt Rainier Jr 


390 


406 


390 


406 










140 


134 


390 


406 






13 


Maryland Park Jr 


459 


376 


459 


376 










110 


127 


441 


373 






14 


Green belt Jr 


511 


473 


511 


473 










145 


124 


511 


473 






15 


Douglas Colored Sr.-Jr 


241 


326 


155 


189 


86 


137 


68 


114 


81 


118 


204 


259 






16 


Fairmont Heights Col. Sr.-Jr 


597 


709 


597 


709 






23 


16 


145 


243 


431 


519 






17 




56 


49 


56 


49 










19 


13 


56 


49 






18 


Lakeland Colored Jr 


100 


92 


100 


92 










100 


92 


100 


92 






19 


Queen Anne's 


617 


638 


123 


111 


491 


527 


470 


501 


509 


518 


487 


508 






20 


Sudlersville Sr -Jr 


146 


153 






146 


153 


131 


152 


126 


126 


101 


123 






21 




213 


213 


43 


37 


170 


176 


164 


151 


172 


169 


157 


144 






22 


Stevensville Sr.-Jr 


91 


94 






91 


94 


91 


94 


74 


69 


62 


63 






23 




167 


178 


80 


74 


84 


104 


84 


104 


137 


154 


167 


178 






24 


St. Mary's 


624 


615 


198 


190 


426 


422 


423 


422 


504 


466 


545 


468 


34 


28 


25 


Margaret Brent Sr -Jr 


188 


178 


117 


93 


71 


83 


68 


84 


153 


136 


158 


103 


2 


4 


26 


Great Mills Sr.-Jr 


267 


235 






267 


234 


267 


233 


238 


189 


218 


163 


32 


24 


27 




116 


155 


si 


97 


35 


58 


35 


58 


60 


94 


116 


155 






28 




53 


47 






53 


47 


53 


47 


53 


47 


53 


47 






29 


Somerset 


771 


747 


449 


435 


321 


310 


337 


333 


632 


583 


663 


616 


4 


6 


30 




163 


143 


95 


82 


68 


61 


62 


63 


156 


119 


118 


103 






31 


Marion Sr.-Jr 


56 


63 


33 


41 


23 


22 


14 


12 


52 


57 


46 


54 






32 




186 


187 


117 


113 


69 


74 


68 


74 


87 


78 


167 


140 


4 


'6 


33 


Deal Island Sr.-Jr 


37 


36 


13 


18 


24 


18 


24 


18 


37 


36 


20 


21 






34 


Ewell Jr 


13 


10 






13 


10 


13 


10 


13 


10 


13 


10 






35 


Greenwood Colored Sr.-Jr 


205 


205 


119 


128 


86 


77 


86 


77 


193 


193 


205 


205 






30 




111 


103 


72 


53 


38 


48 


70 


79 


94 


90 


94 


83 






37 


Talbot 


730 


731 


343 


340 


387 


388 


385 


393 


599 


569 


575 


524 


41 


55 


38 


Easton Sr.-Jr 


320 


336 


193 


172 


127 


162 


125 


167 


237 


222 


268 


231 


24 


38 


39 




153 


139 






153 


139 


153 


139 


140 


115 


124 


96 


17 


17 


411 


Cordova Sr.-Jr 


41 


47 


i(3 


23 


25 


24 


25 


24 


33 


36 


41 


47 






41 




216 


209 


134 


145 


82 


63 


82 


63 


189 


196 


142 


150 






42 


Washington 


3,286 


3,157 


840 


782 


2,445 


2,374 


2,187 


2,225 


2,630 


2,280 


2,447 


2,227 


66 


173 


43 




726 


749 






726 


749 


494 


660 


486 


398 


202 


184 


19 


68 


44 




260 


239 


158 


119 


102 


120 


108 


117 


220 


193 


175 


152 


3 


7 


45 




251 


229 


148 


129 


103 


100 


104 


100 


215 


192 


184 


185 






46 




171 


196 


73 


74 


97 


122 


99 


122 


157 


169 


137 


134 






47 


Boonsboro Sr.-Jr 


494 


420 






494 


420 


467 


381 


439 


350 


398 


310 


25 


3i 


48 




179 


188 


78 


64 


101 


123 


93 


105 


167 


158 


146 


126 






49 




50 


44 


31 


28 


19 


16 


19 


16 


50 


44 


50 


44 






50 


South Potomac Jr 


390 


357 






390 


357 


390 


357 


379 


326 


390 


357 


ii 


3i 


51 




388 


331 






388 


331 


388 


331 


380 


308 


388 


331 


8 


23 


52 




310 


328 


310 


328 










98 


93 


310 


328 




13 


53 




67 


76 


42 


40 


25 


36 


25 


36 


39 


49 


67 


76 






54 


Wicomico 


989 


1,060 






985 


1,060 


831 


886 


865 


906 


705 


712 


117 


138 


55 


Mardela Sr.-Jr 


63 


61 






63 


61 


63 


61 


57 


54 


38 


31 






56 


Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


49 


48 






49 


48 


49 


48 


49 


48 


33 


32 






57 


Wicomico Sr.-Jr 


608 


635 






604 


635 


450 


455 


491 


496 


438 


404 


96 


109 


58 


Hebron Sr.-Jr 


33 


31 






33 


31 


46 


37 


33 


31 


20 


25 




29 


59 




236 


285 






236 


285 


223 


285 


235 


277 


176 


220 


ii 


60 


Worcester 


919 


897 


615 


534 


304 


363 


303 


363 


584 


653 


729 


681 


20 


34 


61 




134 


137 


94 


69 


40 


68 


40 


68 


117 


113 


113 


92 


8 


22 


62 


Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


167 


161 


103 


95 


64 


66 


63 


66 


125 


112 


126 


111 


12 


12 


63 


Buckingham Sr.-Jr 


222 


227 


149 


130 


73 


97 


73 


97 


95 


144 


163 


159 






64 


Ocean City Sr.-Jr 


82 


70 


49 


42 


33 


28 


33 


28 


74 


61 


58 


47 






65 


Worcester Colored Sr.-Jr 


192 


191 


98 


87 


94 


104 


94 


104 


106 


158 


147 


161 






66 




44 


46 


44 


46 










44 


46 


44 


46 






67 


Berlin Colored Jr 


78 


65 


78 


65 










23 


19 


78 


65 







* Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Baltimore, Franklin Sr.-Jr— 22. 
t Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Frederick, Thurmont Sr.-Jr— 1; Queen Anne's, 
Centreville Sr.-Jr .— 2. 



Maryland State Department of Education 243 



County Public High School : Year Ending June 30, 1953 



French 


Spanish 


Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 


Home 
Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art-Arts 
and Crafts 


* 

Gen. 


t 

Voc. 


Arts 


° X 
Edu. 


Gen. 


a 

Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




1DD 


195 


301 


214 


146 


153 


5,237 


211 


558 


16 


4,283 


636 


748 


2,255 


0.-14S 


5,940 


3,950 


4,203 


2,785 




2,770 


Z 


AO 
4Z 


40 


84 


59 






214 


4 


352 


16 


80 


141 


121 


537 


532 


386 


116 


144 


140 


70 


o 
O 


A K 
40 


48 


112 


87 






400 


18 


47 




61 


256 


159 


625 


587 


471 


57 


204 


51 


94 


4 












60 


140 


13 






125 




31 


102 


230 


238 


136 


124 


79 


69 


5 


21 


16 


44 


19 






576 


117 


32 




299 


72 


204 


423 


641 


599 


444 


450 


308 


397 


6 


15 


21 










205 








122 


62 


17 


42 


203 


140 


115 


101 






7 


09 

zz 


25 


21 


i5 






201 


59 






133 




52 


85 


278 


272 


249 


237 






8 


c 
O 


9 








48 


139 








136 


7 


27 


94 


217 


184 


158 


181 


26 


42 


o 
y 






27 


20 






322 








221 


39 


81 


126 


359 


308 


170 


202 


189 


178 


in 














646 








557 








646 


557 


476 


403 


451 


385 


11 














547 








539 








495 


504 


322 


322 


352 


347 


12 














390 








406 








390 


406 


298 


367 


304 


273 


1 9 

16 














441 








373 








450 


357 


294 


301 


132 


54 


14 














511 








473 








511 


473 


350 


317 


358 


318 


1 K 


1 3 
IO 


36 






146 


45 










134 


59 


4 


43 


203 


251 


167 


190 


63 


152 


1 A 
ID 






i3 


14 






405 




127 




532 




52 


178 


550 


653 


442 


519 


276 


342 


1 7 






























56 


49 


56 


49 


56 


49 


IS 














100 








92 








100 


92 


100 


92 






19 


23 


31 


14 


19 


152 


47 


553 


6 






364 


155 


51 


175 


602 


623 


375 


371 


91 


77 


20 


11 


10 






38 




128 


6 






122 




22 


77 


146 


152 


117 


98 






91 
/i 


B 



15 


ii 


19 


30 


47 


174 








106 


51 


7 


61 


200 


202 


91 


95 


91 


77 


99 

ZZ 


4 


6 










84 








62 




22 


37 


89 


91 










93 

ZO 










84 




167 








74 


104 






167 


178 


167 


178 






24 


10 


10 






68 


100 


35 








371 


57 


104 


174 


553 


538 


468 


518 


130 


99 


25 










49 


45 










147 




44 


89 


187 


176 


127 


139 






9fi 
ZO 


10 


10 


















133 




55 


77 


250 


207 


172 


177 


112 


88 


97 
Z/ 










19 












64 


48 


5 


8 


116 


155 


116 


155 






98 
Zo 














35 








27 


9 










53 


47 


is 


ii 


29 


34 


31 






27 


25 


315 


3 






545 




159 


162 


706 


519 


431 


436 


26 


28 


30 


15 


14 






27 


25 










80 




52 


39 


162 


139 










31 


4 


6 






















25 


32 


55 


63 


28 


27 






oZ 


10 


11 


















161 




82 


91 


161 




161 


161 






33 


































13 


18 


13 


18 


o4 






























13 


10 






13 


10 


do 














205 


3 






202 








205 


205 


119 


128 






36 














110 








102 








110 


102 


110 


102 






37 


46 


46 






40 


118 


435 


16 






457 


39 


83 


164 


578 


561 


504 


463 


92 


80 


oo 


i 3 
io 


14 








35 


219 








196 




72 


128 


215 


191 


193 


172 






3Q 


Q 

y 


12 








18 


106 


16 






92 




11 


36 


132 


128 


85 


77 


92 


80 


/in 

4U 












25 










24 








41 


47 


41 


47 






A 1 
41 


94 
Z4 


20 






40 


40 


110 








145 


39 






190 


195 


185 


167 






42 


58 


121 


63 


117 


96 


283 


2,318 


4 


305 


6 


2,185 


210 


392 


1,140 


3,275 


3,123 


2,326 


2,430 


993 


932 


43 


31 


40 


63 


117 




54 


210 


1 


305 




257 


75 


154 


777 


726 


743 


169 


278 


63 


47 


44 




3 








61 


181 








179 




38 


88 


254 


235 


180 


199 






40 


e 



21 






36 


32 


111 








106 


26 


82 


77 


251 


229 


183 


190 


62 


64 


46 




12 










140 


3 




6 


134 


39 


39 


31 


170 


195 


22 


73 






47 


fj 


24 








80 


389 








314 


29 


70 


95 


494 


400 


466 


405 






48 


7 


13 






36 


37 


101 








70 


41 


9 


72 


179 


188 


121 


156 






49 










24 


19 


31 








44 








50 


44 


50 


44 






50 














390 








357 








390 


357 


390 


357 


356 


324 


51 














388 








331 








384 


328 


388 


331 


243 


228 


52 














310 








317 








310 


328 


290 


321 


227 


229 


53 


1 


8 










67 








76 








67 


76 


67 


76 


42 


40 


54 


14 


25 


8 


24 




122 


726 








745 




172 


271 


602 


652 


639 


729 


276 


270 


55 


6 


9 










63 








54 




14 


14 






63 


61 


63 


61 


56 














49 








48 




16 


16 






49 


48 


49 


48 


57 


8 


io 


! 8 


24 




64 


427 








358 




131 


208 


366 


367 


326 


3>> 


131 


130 


58 


























9 


11 






33 


31 


33 


31 


59 












58 


187 








285 




2 


22 


236 


285 


168 


201 






60 


18 


36 






78 


79 


441 


14 






436 


41 


199 


261 


859 


804 


659 


636 


178 


142 


61 














105 








88 




22 


49 


131 


126 


104 


98 






62 












26 


129 








126 




27 


51 


163 


151 


103 


95 






63 


14 


27 






58 




133 








134 




63 


80 


174 


167 


155 


154 


59 


49 


64 


4 


9 










74 


14 






54 




. 24 


40 


77 


58 










65 










20 


53 










34 


41 


63 


41 


192 


191 


175 


178 


41 


28 


66 
67 






























44 


46 


44 


46 


































78 


65 


78 


65 


78 


65 



X Includes the following number of girls and boys taking Diversified Occupations: Baltimore, Kenwood Sr. -Jr.— 24 
boys, 8 girls; Carroll, Westminster Sr. -Jr.— 11 boys, 12 girls; Dorchester, Cambridge Jr.— 21 boys; Montgomery, Bethesda- 
Chevy Chase Sr.— 25 boys, 12 girls; Montgomery Blair Sr.— < - >7 bo vs. 30 girls; Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr.— 12 boys, 10 
girls; Prince George's, Northwestern Sr.— 31 boys, 16 girls; Suitland Sr.-Jr.— 23 boys, 9 girls. 

Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Montgomery, Carver Colored Sr.— 28; Prince 
George's, Bladensburg Sr.— 7; Fairmont Heights Colored Sr.-Jr— 1. 

a Includes the following number of boys taking Vocational Home Economics: Charles, Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr.— 4 ; 
Queen Anne's, Centreville Sr.-Jr— 2. 



INDEX 



Academic course, each high school, 232-237 
Accreditation and certification, 26-33 
Administration 

General Control 

Cost per pupil, 140-141 
Expenditure, 228 
Per cent for, 138-139 

Superintendents, 2, 5-7, 219, 224 
Adult education, 157, 160-163, 226 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 160-163 

Enrollment, 90-91, 101 
Each high school, 238-243 

Failures and withdrawals, 111 

Federal aid, 157-159, 163 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 112 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution bv 
type of fund, 134-137, 199, 224-225 

State teachers colleges, 185, 186, 199, 201 

Vocational education, 157, 160, 163, 199, 221 

Vocational rehabilitation, 191, 199 
Appropriations 

County, 134-137, 170-172, 199, 222 

State, 134-137, 199, 222 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 102 
Each high school, 238-243 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Assessable basis, 174-176 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 216 

Average daily, 215 

Each high school, 232-237 

Per cent of, 217 

Summer school pupils, 189 

Teachers at summer school, 114 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 63 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per pupil for, 142-145 

Expenditures for, 226, 228-231 

Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 104 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 199, 220 
Belonging, average number, 214 

Each high school, 232-237 

Per teacher, 68 
Birth rates, 64-66 

Board of Education, State, 2, 199-200 
Boards of Education, County, 5-7 
Bonds outstanding, school, 167 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 142, 144 
Hign, 143, 145 
Expenditures 
All schools, 225 
Elementary, 228, 230 
High, 229, 231 
Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 
By grade, 69 
Total 

Nonpublic, 208-213 
Public, 206-207 
Graduates, high school, 82-89, 232-237 
Budget (s) 

Baltimore City, county, local, 134-137, 170-172, 

223 

State public school, 199 
State teachers colleges, 199, 201 
Building report, 22-24 



B — (Continued) 

Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 

Number of, 129-132, 205 

Value of school, per pupil, 168-169 
Business education 

Adult, 161-163 

Enrollment, 90-91, 103, 157-159, 163 

Each high school, 238-243 
Failures and withdrawals, 110 
Schools offering, 112, 238-243 
Teachers, 112 



Capital outlay, school 

By site, building, equipment, 227 

By type of school, 142-145, 166, 228-231 

Census, school, 75-81 

Certificates held by county teachers, 115-119 
Certification and accreditation, 26-33 

Evening schcol, 161-163 
Size of, 68 

Special for handicapped, 61-62 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 189 

Clerks, county schools, 219 

Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1952 entering, 85-89 

of 1953 entering State teachers colleges, 83, 
232-237 
Junior, 181, 183-184 
State teachers, 4, 179-186, 199, 201-204 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland coun- 
ties, 113 

Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 128 

Transportation of pupils, 152-156 
Construction accounts, State teachers colleges 

202-204 
Core program , high school 

Enrollment, 90-91 

Each high school, 238-243 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 142-145 

By type of school, 141 

General control, 140-141 

Individual high schools, 232-237 

State teachers colleges, 185 

Transported, 152, 155 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 5-7 
Courses in individual high schools, 232-237 
Crippled children, services for, 61-62, 195-196 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 140-145 

Individual high schools, 232-237 
Expenditures 
All schools, 223 

By source of funds, 136-137 
By type of school, 228-231 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 55 
Days in session, 55, 217 
Debt service 

1952-195:., 168, 170-172, 227 

Tax rate for, 173 
Dental program, 197 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 157-159, 163 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 105 

Schools offering, 112 

Teachers, 112 



244 



Index 



245 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 133, 219 
Emergency certificates, 115-119 
Employment of high school graduates, 84-89 
English, high school 
Enrollment, 90-91, 93 

Each nigh school, 238-243 
Failures and withdrawals, 110-111 
Schools offering, 112, 238-243 
Teachers, 112 
Enrollment 

Adult, 161, 163 

Atypical children, 63 

Elementary, 56, 58-60, 69-72, 206-213 

Grade or year, 69-72 

High school 

Course, each school, 232-237 
Growth in, 150-151 
June net roll, 92 
Subjects, 90-91, 93-103, 105 

Each school, 238-243 
Year, 69-72, 92 

Each school, 232-237 
Increase in, 57-60 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 56, 58-60, 
208-213 

Number different pupils, 57-60, 206-207 
Public, 56-60, 69-72, 206-207 
State teachers colleges, 181-183 
Subject, high school, 90-91, 93-103, 105 

Each high school, 238-243 
Summary, 56-60 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 189 
Equalization fund, 136-137, 220 
Equivalence examinations, 189 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 161, 163 

Expenditures, 157, 160, 163, 226 
Expenditures, 223-231 

(see also General control. Instruction, Opera- 
tion, Maintenance, Auxiliary agencies, Fixed 
charges, Payments to adjoining counties, Cur- 
rent expenses, Debt service, Capital outlay) 

Elementarv schools, 228, 230 

Evening schools, 157, 160, 163, 226 

Health, 226 

High schools, 229, 231 

Libraries, 225 

Rehabilitation, 51-54 

Salaries 

AH schools, 225 
Elementarv, 228, 230 
High, 150-151, 229, 231 
Vocational, 157-160, 163 

State teachers colleges, 185-186, 199, 201 

TotP-1, by major classifications, 199, 223 

Transportation, 152, 154, 155, 226 

Vocational, Federal, 157-160, 163, 221 



G— (Continued) 



Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 104 
Grade enrollment, 69-72, 92 
Graduates 

High school, 82-89 

Entering State teachers colleges, 83, 85-86, 
88—89 

From each school, 232-237 
Occupations of, 84-89 
State teachers colleges, 179-180 
Guidance, teachers of, 112 



Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 61, 199 

Home instruction, 61 

Hospital schools, 61, 205 

Institutions for, 61, 63 

Opportunities for education of, 61-63 

Receipts from State for, 61, 199, 220 

Transportation of, 61 
Health 

Activities of State and county departments 
195-197 

Expenditures, all schools, 226 
Hearing, conservation of, 61-63 
High school equivalence examinations, 189 
High schools 

Aid for, 220 

Disbursements, 220, 231 

Individual, 232-237, 238-243 

Supervision, 133, 219 
Home economics 

Adult, 157, 161-163 

Enrollment, 90-91, 101 
Each high school, 238-243 

Federal aid, 157-160, 163 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Home instruction of pupils, 61 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 61, 205 



Immunizations, 195 
Income payments, per capita, 178 
Income tax, per capita, 177 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 171-172 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 34-44 

Cost per pupil, 142-145 

Expenditures, 228-231 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 225 
State teachers colleges, 185-186 

Per cent of current expense budget, 136-137 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 186 



Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 56, 69-72 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 157-163, 199, 221 
Administration and supervision, 163 
Salaries of teachers, 157-160, 163 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 185-186, 199, 201 
Financial statements, 198 

State public schools, 199, 220-231 

State teachers colleges, 199, 201-204 
Financial statements and summary tables, 198—243 
First grade nonpromotions, 74 
Fixed charges, 138-139, 226 
French, nigh school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 100 
Each high school, 238-243 

Failures and withdrawals, 110 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 



General control 

Cost per pupil, 140-141 
Expenditures, 224 
Per cent for, 138-139 



Janitors, repair, utility men, 219 
Junior colleges, 181, 183-184 



K 



Kindergartens, 69-72 
Nonpublic, 208-213 



Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 10-13 

Length of session, 55, 217 

Letter of transmittal, 9 

Levies, county, 170-172 

Librarians, county, 3-4 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 193-194, 225 

Public, 3-4, 193 

School, 194 
Library extension, 3, 45-50, 192-194, 199 
Lip reading classes, 62, 163 
Lunch program, school, 25, 164-165, 221, 226 



246 



Index 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 142-145 

Expenditures, 226, 228-231 

Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 98-99 
Each high school, 238-243 

Failures and withdrawals, 110-111 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 195 

Teachers, 199 
Men teachers, 128, 218-219 
Mentally handicapped children, 62 
Minutes, State Board, 14-21 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 102 
Each high school, 238-243 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 104 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult educa- 
tion) 

Nonpromotions 
Elementary, 73-74 
First grade, 74 

Subject, high schools, 106-111 
Each subject, 110-111 
One or more subjects, 106-109 
Number belonging, 214 
Each high school, 232-237 
Per teacher, 68 
Number different pupils, 57-60, 206-207 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 63 
Having one teacher, 127, 205 
Nonpublic, 56, 208-213 
Public, 56, 205 

Elementary, 127-130, 205 
High, 131-132, 205 



Occupations of high school graduates, 84-89 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 127 

Number belonging in, 127 

Number of, 127, 205 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 142-145 

Expenditures, 225, 228-231 

Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 104 



Parent-teacher associations, 188 

Parochial and private schools, 56, 58-60, 208-213 

Part-payment of salaries, 220 

Payments to adjoining counties, 138-139, 227 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 195-197, 226 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 199 

Enrollment, 90-91, 102 
Each high school, 238-243 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 61-63 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 4 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 219 
Private and parochial schools, 56, 58-60, 208-213 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 174-175 

School, 168-169 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-7 

Supervisors of, 133, 219 
Salaries, 224 



P— (Continued) 

Pupils 

Atypical, 63 

Nonpublic, 56, 58-60, 208-213 
One-teacher schools, 127-128 
Per teacher, 68 
Public school 

Enrollment, 56-60, 206-207 

Number attending, 215 

Number belonging, 214 

Per cent of attendance, 217 
Transported, 152-153 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 222 

Federal government, 221 
Evening schools, 160 
Teachers' salaries, 157-160, 163 
Vocational education, 157-160, 163 

State, 220 

Distributed by type of fund, 134-135, 199, 220 

Evening schools, 160 

Total and per cent, 134-135 

Teachers colleges, 185-186, 199, 201 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 2-3, 51-54, 190-191, 199 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 219 
Resignations, teachers, 120-121 
Retarded children, program for, 61-63 
Retirement system for teachers, 4, 187, 199 



Salaries 

Growth of high school, 150-151 
Per cent of school budget, 138-139 
Superintendents, 224 
Supervisors, 225 

Pupil personnel, 224 
Teachers 

Average per teacher, 146-149 

Cost per pupil, 142-145 
Total 

Elementary, 228, 230 

High, 150-151, 229, 231 

Vocational, 157-160 
School building report, 22-24 
School census, 75-81 

School lunch program, 25, 164-165, 221, 226 
Schools 

For atypical children, 63 

Number of, 56, 127-132, 205, 208-213 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 96-97 
Each high school, 238-243 

Failures and withdrawals, 110-111 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Session, length of, 55, 217 
Sex of teachers, 128, 218-219 
Sight conservation classes, 62 
Size of 

Classes, 68 

Schools 

Each high school, 232-237 
Elementary, 127-130 
High, 131-132 

Teaching staff, 56, 127-129, 131, 218-219 
Social studies, high school 

Enrollment, 90-91, 94-95 
Each high school, 238-243 

Failures and withdrawals, 110-111 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 61-63, 199 

Special high school teachers, 112 

State 

Aid to schools, 134-135 

Showing various funds, 199, 220 
Board of Education, 2, 199 

Excerpts from minutes of, 14-21 
Department of Education, 2-3 
Department of Health, school activities, 195-197 
Income taxes, 177 
Public school budget, 199-200 



Index 



247 



S — (Continued) 

Teachers colleges, 4, 83, 85-86, 88-89, 179-183, 
185-186, 199, 201, 232-237 

Teachers' retirement system, 4, 187, 199 
Statistical tables and financial statements, 198 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 

education) 
Subjects studied in high schools, 90-105 

Each high school, 238-243 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 114 

Pupils, Baltimore City, 189 
Superintendents, 2, 5-7, 219 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 142-145 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 225 
By type of school, 228-231 

Names of, 2-3, 5-7 

Number of, 133, 219 

Per cent of current expense budget, 138-139 
Salaries of, 225, 228-231 
State, 2-3 

T 

Taxable basis, 174-176 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 138-139 

Tax rates, county, 173 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 112 

Average salary, 146-148 

Certification, 26-33, 115-119 

Colleges, 4, 83, 85-86, 88-89, 179-183, 185-186, 

199, 201, 232-237 
Growth in number, 150-151 
Number of, 218-219 

For each high school subject, 112 
In each high school, 232-237 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 63 
Nonpublic, 56, 208-213 
Public, 56, 218-219 
Summer schools, Baltimore City, 189 
Of atypical children, 63 
Pupils per, 68 
Resignations, 120-121 
Salaries 

Average, 146-149 
Growth in high school, 150-151 
Sex of, 128, 218-219 
Special subjects, high schools, 112 



T— (Continued) 

Summary, elementary and high, publicjand non- 
public, 56 
Summer school attendance, 114 
Training institutions, 179-183, 185-186, 199, 201 
Turnover of, 120-126 
Teachers' retirement system 
Financial statements, 187, 199 
Staff, 4 

Teachers' contributions to, 187 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 157, 160, 161-163 

Enrollment, 90-91, 101, 158-159 
Each high school, 238-243 

Federal aid, 157-160, 163 

Schools offering, 112, 238-243 

Teachers, 112 
Training centers, State teachers colleges, 181-182 
Transmittal, letter of, 9 
Transportation of pupils, 152-156, 226 

Cost, total and per pupil, 152, 154-155, 226 

Per cent transported, 152-153 

Physically handicapped, 61 
Tuition charges, State teachers colleges, 185-186 
Turnover in teaching staff, 120-126 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 174-176 

School property, 168-169 
Vocational education, 157-163, 199, 221 

Enrollment 

Day schools, 90-91, 101, 158-159, 238-243 
Evening schools, 160-163 

Federal aid, 157-160, 199, 221 

State aid, 199 
Vocational giiidance, 112, 163 

Vocational rehabilitation, 2-3, 51-54, 190-191, 199 

w 

Wealth back of each pupil, 176 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 67 

High, 110-111 
Withdrawals of teachers, 120-121 

Y 

Year, length of school, 55, 217 



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FEB 2 1955 

hALL OF RcCORDS 

ANNAPOLIS, fvlD. 



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UHIV Of MO COLLEGE PAW* 



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